Skip to main content

E-edition January 18, 2014

January 18, 2014

To view the E-Edition of the newspaper, please login. If you have not subscribed to the E-Edition, you can do so by subscribing here.

The rates for the E-Edition are:

1 day 99¢
3 months $18 for 90 days
6 months $36 for 180 days
12 months $72 for 360 days

Embedded Scribd iPaper - Requires Javascript and Flash Player

COURIER
MISSED PAPERS
CALL
(501) 317-6013
DURING THESE HOURS
5-7 p.m. Monday-Friday
7-9 a.m. Saturday-Sunday
CONTACT US
Phone: (501) 315-8228
Fax: (501) 315-1920
E-mail: news@bentoncourier.com
Write: P.O. Box 207,
Benton, AR 72018
1016 W. South Street • Benton, AR 72015 • 501-315-5100
Cold & Flu Season is here!
Come see us for all your cold and allergy needs!
FLU SHOTS AVAILABLE DAILY!
W
E
D
E
L
IV
E
R
!
We provide:
Diabetic
Supplies
Medicare
Approved!!
Volume 137
Number 18
1 Section 12 Pages
50¢
Home of S R Sims
and Dorothy Jones
THE SALINE
INDEX
OBITUARIES .............................. 3
EDITORIAL ................................. 4
SPORTS .................................. 5,6
CLASSIFIEDS .......................... 10
COMICS ................................... 11
www. bent oncouri er. com
Saturday, January 18, 2014
Join us on Facebook and Twitter
Get in a workout.
Get on with your life!
SCRAPBOOK
Jamboree frog winner ‘76
PAGE 2
SALINE COUNTY
WEATHER FORECAST
TONIGHT: Clear. Lows in
the lower 30s.
SUNDAY: Sunny. Highs in
the upper 50s.
SUNDAY NIGHT: Clear.
Lows in the upper 30s.
MONSDAY: Mostly sunny.
Highs in the upper 50s.
MONDAY NIGHT: Partly
cloudy. Lows in the 30s.
TUESDAY: Mostly sunny.
Highs in the upper 40s.
SALINE COUNTY’S NEWS SOURCE SINCE 1876
501-425-3796
Affordable Comfort for Your
Home or Business
HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING
Installation, Maintenance
and 24 Hour Service
Residential &
Commerical
The Benton Police Department,
in conjunction with the Saline
County Prosecutors Office, recently
held the nationally renowned crimi-
nal and terrorist interdiction train-
ing group known as ‘Desert Snow’.
The class was held at the Benton
Events Center from Jan 14-16. Forty
officers from 15 different agencies
participated.
The Desert Snow program was
created in 1989 with the goal of
giving officers professional, legal,
roadside interdiction tactics to help
them identify terrorists and major
smugglers while conducting every-
day patrol responsibilities. This
program teaches officers to conduct
legal traffic stops and how to iden-
tify major criminal activity on each
and every traffic stop.
According to the Benton Police
Department, Desert Snow instruc-
tors focus solely on this type of
training because they feel the
terrorist and drug problem in the
United States is so prolific and such
a threat to the American public that
it warrants their complete focus.
Dave Frye, Director of Training for
Desert Snow said, “the purpose of
this training is not to encourage
searches, but instead the goal is
to teach officers to search vehicles
where criminal activity is present.”
Saline County Prosecutor, Ken
Cassady, said “we were happy to
host this type of training for the law
enforcement officers in the county
and think it will be very beneficial
for the agencies represented.”
The Desert Snow course is
embarking on a national training
tour this year where they will train
officers in 36 different states by the
end of 2014.
‘Desert Snow’provides
training to local officers
By Bobbye Pyke
bpyke@bentoncourier.com
Justice of the Peace- Barbara
Howell announced today that she is
seeking her 6th term on the Saline
County Quorum Court representing
District 4 in Northeast
Saline County which
includes 137 square
miles. Mrs. Howell
has worked on the fol-
lowing committees:
Finance & Personnel,
Public Works and
also Human Resource
Committee. She has enjoyed serv-
ing the people and working with
them. In 2008 Howell was active in
obtaining a new bridge over Caney
Creek . She said that the old bridge
was flooded many times and left the
people at Lake Norrell stranded dur-
ing high water. She has also worked
on many other projects in the Lake
Norrell and surrounding area. She
has been a board member of the
Lake Norrell Area Association for
the past 14 years. The served as
president for 9 of those years and
continues to serve as vice president.
She publishes a 12 page bi-monthly
newsletter for the area. She the
Fundraising Chairman for the Lake
Norrell Area Association that raises
money for the 4th of July Fireworks
Display and the upkeep of the
Lake Norrell Community Center.
She has also been the Fundraising
Chairman for the Lake Norrell Fire
Dept for the past 14 years. Howell
worked with the Salem Water Users
Association for several years to
help the area residents to get city
water. Howell saw a need in 2008
for a pavilion to be added to the
Lake Norrell Community Center
and the pavilion was built that year.
Large events for the community are
held there for the Lake Norrell Area
Association and the Lake Norrell
Fire Dept. In 2008 when the Avilla
Community Center ( largest voting
precinct in district 4) was burned by
arsonists she found help to rebuild
the building. The building was
completed just 1 day before the pri-
mary election in May of 2008. She
became the Fundraising Chairman
in 2008 for the Avilla Community
Center and continued the tradition
of raising money with a Pie & Cake
Auction for the upkeep of the build-
ing. Howell was honored in 2012 at
Lake Norrell with the first Lifetime
Achievement Award for her many
years of volunteerism. She was also
honored as one of Saline County’s
Extraordinary People at a banquet
by the Saline Courier in 2012.
In 2013 Howell worked for a
grant to put a new roof on the Avilla
Community Center. She announced
it at a special meeting on October
14, 2013. She was given special
recognition herself by the Avilla
Extension Homemakers as the
Lifetime Fundraising Chairman
and thanked for all the work she
has done for the Avilla Community
Center for the past 6 years. Howell
loves working with the members of
the Quroum Court and helping her
constituents. She is married to Jack
Howell who is a volunteer fireman
with the Lake Norrell Fire Dept.
Barbara Howell is an active mem-
ber of the New Life Baptist Church
and a member of the Lake Norrell
Ladies Bible Study.
Barbara Howell seeks 6th term on Saline County Quorum Court
Howell
BRENT DAVIS/The Saline Courier
A worker from
Helping Hands Store
on South Street
sweeps up broken
glass following
an accident Friday
afternoon in which
a vehicle crashed
into the business’s
window front. The
driver of a late model
Mercury pulled into
the parking spot but
continued over a
couch and into the
window. Witnesses
at the scene indicat-
ed that the car rolled
up into the window
and then back onto
South Street. The
driver of the Mercury
was not injured.
One year ago, a group of Benton
residents joined to for Benton
Matters. The purpose of the organi-
zation is to locate areas within the
city limits that need beautification.
The first clean up was on Martin
Luther King Jr. Day in 2013. On
Jan. 20, the group returns to the
location of its first clean up, Ralph
Bunche Park.
Edd Spurlock is chairman of the
group and urges any individual
interested in helping with the effort
to join him at Ralph Bunche Park
at 9 a.m.
Bob Miller, a Benton Matters
member, says there will be plenty
to do and all help is appreciated.
“We will take a look around the
area and decide what areas to pri-
oritize. Individual and group assign-
ments will be made at the time.” A
good majority of the tasks include
clearing brush, picking up trash
and cutting weeds. Miller asks that
items such as weed eaters, wheel
barrows, shovels, clippers and other
clean up items are welcomed if indi-
viduals bring them. Some supplies
will be provided on site, including
trash bags and vests.
Following the group’s success-
ful effort at Ralph Bunche Park
in 2013, additional areas were tar-
geted for clean up in Benton. South
Street was cleaned from Downtown
Benton to I-30. Buildings were
painted in the downtown area. Six
dumpsters were filled with material
from the area throughout the day.
Edison Avenue was next on the
list, followed by Hoover Street near
Angie Grant Elementary.
Ralph Bunche Park is located at
1300 S. East Street in Benton.
Group plans Ralph
Bunche Park clean up
By Brent Davis
bdavis@bentoncourier.com
Lt. Mike Frost, a long-
time employee of the Saline
County Sheriff’s Office, has
left the agency.
Frost, who oversaw the
criminal investigation divi-
sion at the Saline County
Sheriff’s Office, reportedly
has retired.
According to Lt. Scotty
Courtney, Frost submitted
his letter of retirement on
Thursday.
Frost had worked for the
Sheriff’s Office for 19-plus
years, Courtney said.
Sheriff Cleve Barfield
was not available to discuss
Frost’s departure.
Frost could not be
reached for comment.
Mike Frost
retiring from
sheriff’s office
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
DRIVE THROUGH
The 41st Annual Winter
Banquet and Silent
Auction in Bryant may be
just around the corner,
but tickets are still avail-
able, according to Bryant
Chamber of Commerce
Executive Director Rae
Anne Fields.
“The banquet is the larg-
est gathering of profession-
al and business people in
the Bryant area of the year.
The committee expects a
crowd of more than 400
people at the Center at
Bishop Park.” said Fields.
“We are excited to hold our
banquet at this great facil-
ity and we are equally as
excited about some of the
great silent auction items
that have been donated.
We have some high dollar
items this year – a gun,
Oaklawn packages includ-
ing meals, jewelry and
several Valentines Day
gifts. I am always awed by
our donor’s creativity and
grateful for their generous
support,” she added.
This year instead of
a featured speaker, The
Bryant Area Chamber of
Commerce will feature peo-
ple in the community who
have shown outstanding
service to the community.
“It is the people who are
building up our community,
who are contributors on a
large scale engaged in pro-
moting activities that will
make us greater and great-
er, that we will recognize”
noted chairperson Allison
Ramsey of Staffmark ,
Winter Banquet Committee
Chairman. The event is
sponsored by Landers Auto
of Saline County.
A total of 28 Community
Commitment Award recipi-
ents were nominated by
Tickets still remain for Winter Banquet
By Brent Davis
bdavis@bentoncourier.com
TICKETS, page 2
2 The Saline Courier
Saturday, January 18, 2014
JJ’s Restaurant
Sunday, January 19, 2014....Only
$
11.99
Sunday Buffet 11:00 am to 7:30 pm
MEATS
Fresh Cabbage Rolls
Roast Pork
Southern Fried Chicken
Meatloaf
Mexican Chicken Casserole
VEGETABLES
Fresh Squash Casserole
Corn
Green Beans w/New
Potatoes
Steamed Cabbage
Honey Glazed Carrots
VEGETABLES continued
Pinto Beans w/Ham
Homemade Mashed
Potatoes w/Gravy
Fried Okra
Candied Yams
FRESH HOMEMADE SALADS
Deviled Eggs
Waldorf Fruit Salad
Mandarin Orange Salad
Cole Slaw
Potato Salad
Fresh Garden Green
Salad
HOMEMADE DESSERTS
Pineapple Upside Down Cake
Chocolate Orange Cake
Homemade Banana
Pudding
Hot Blackberry, Apple &
Peach Cobblers
Sugar Free Desserts
BREAD
Homemade Hot Yeast Rolls
Homemade Cornbread
JJ's Restaurant
“We remember what Mama’s Cooking was like.”
I-30 EXIT 106 • BENTON • 501-778-2295
ReseRvations available
501-778-2295
Free Thr w
Championship
Boys & Girls Club
Sponsorship:
Our Lady of Fatima
Knights of Columbus
All Boys and Girls 9-14 can participate!
(proof of age required)
NO COST TO PARTICIPATE!
Registation forms available at Boys & Girls club
and day of the contest.
Come to compete for local, district, state and international titles!!
Prize awarded for each age bracket for both boys & girls!
For more information contact:
Ron Lee at 501-860-1385
Sat., Jan. 25
Sun., Jan. 26
shslclub@aol.com
www.hslionsgunshow.com
$7.00
4013 Springhill Rd., Bryant
.
501-847-6888
St. Regis
AT HURRICANE LAKE
Distinctive Apartment Living
Now Leasing Upscale -
Patio Apartment Homes
Phase 2 Now Open - 3 Floor Plans Available
Small Pets Welcome
Antiques & Collectibles
22430 I-30 • Exit 123
Bryant • 847-7117
Open 7 Days a Week
SALINE COURIER SCRAPBOOK 1976
Courier Photo
Bryan Parker, six-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Bob Parker of Benton, holds his frog which was
selected as the largest frog in competition at the “Good Time Jamboree.” The frog was found at the
Trace Creek Country Club pond.
NEW YORK (AP) — Will
broadband providers start
charging Internet services
such as Netflix to deliver
the massive amounts of data
that streaming video and
other content require?
A court ruling this week
gives providers such as
Comcast, Time Warner
Cable and Verizon more
flexibility to do that, even
though immediate changes
are unlikely.
Technically, providers
have always been allowed
to charge Netflix, Google
and others for priority treat-
ment. But the so-called net
neutrality rules adopted by
the FCC in 2010 discour-
aged the practice, and any
attempt to do it would likely
have faced a challenge from
the agency.
In striking down those
rules Tuesday, a three-judge
panel of the U.S. Court of
Appeals for the D.C. Circuit
lifted any uncertainty and
removed any constraints
broadband providers might
have felt.
Services such as Netflix
already pay their broadband
providers to send data from
their systems. What's in
question is whether they'll
also have to pay their sub-
scribers' providers for deliv-
ery of the data.
Netflix's stock fell more
than 2 percent Wednesday
to $330.50 out of concern
that if the company may
someday have to pay their
subscribers' broadband pro-
viders, thereby leaving the
company with less money
to license content. Investors
also worried that Netflix Inc.
might pass along any new
costs to subscribers in the
form of fee hikes.
Netflix had no comment
Wednesday.
Few people expect imme-
diate changes to the way
people access entertain-
ment, news and other online
content. That's because
major cable providers
already have pledged not to
block or hinder legal web-
sites and other content.
The regulatory dispute
comes down to both sides
trying to avert constraints
on what they're allowed to
do in the future.
Public advocacy groups
pushed for regulations to
ensure that the Internet
remains open in the years
to come, so that consum-
ers could continue to enjoy
the Internet without limita-
tions. They want to ensure
that startups and nonprofits
have as much of a chance to
reach an audience as estab-
lished companies such as
Google.
Broadband providers
prefer the flexibility of evolv-
ing as the Internet evolves.
They want to be able to
experiment with business
models — including the
creation of special charges
for priority treatment. Even
if providers don't intention-
ally slow traffic from content
companies that choose not
to pay, the effect would be
the same if their rivals get
faster delivery to consumers
by paying.
The appeals court
affirmed that the FCC had
authority to create open-
access rules, but it ruled
that the FCC failed to estab-
lish that its 2010 regulations
don't overreach.
The judges said those
regulations treated all
Internet service providers
as common carriers — a
general term for airlines,
utilities and other transport-
ers of people or goods for
the general public on regu-
lar routes at set rates. But
the court said the FCC itself
already had classified broad-
band providers as exempt
from treatment as common
carriers, which set up a
legal contradiction.
FCC Chairman Tom
Wheeler said the commis-
sion will now consider its
options, including an appeal.
The FCC also could draft
new rules or reclassify
broadband providers, or
Congress could change the
1996 telecommunications
law that gave the commis-
sion different authority
depending on whether a
company was a common
carrier or not.
Concerns about dis-
crimination grew in 2007
after The Associated Press
ran tests and reported
that Comcast Corp. was
interfering with attempts
by some subscribers to
share files online through
a service called BitTorrent.
Although Comcast said it
did so because BitTorrent
was clogging its networks,
public interest groups grew
worried that broadband pro-
viders were becoming gate-
keepers of online content.
After all, the files exchanged
through BitTorrent included
video, something that
threatens Comcast's cable
TV business.
Comcast's actions drew
rebuke from the FCC and
a pledge by all of the major
broadband providers includ-
ing Comcast not to discrimi-
nate. The 2010 rules were
meant to ensure that such
open access continued.
Despite the court deci-
sion, Comcast is bound
by the rules for another
few years as part of an
agreement it made when
it bought NBCUniversal in
2011.
Verizon, which filed the
case against the FCC, said
that it remained committed
to an open Internet and that
Tuesday's court decision
"will not change consumers'
ability to access and use the
Internet as they do now."
But Verizon also said
the decision "will allow
more room for innovation,
and consumers will have
more choices to determine
for themselves how they
access and experience the
Internet."
Those innovations and
choices could one day
include tolls on Netflix and
other services.
Charging Netflix at issue
in Internet-neutrality case
Associated Press
Chamber members and then
selected by out of town com-
mittees from other cham-
bers to insure no bias in the
selection. They review the
nominators’ notes and the
nominated’s information that
they turn in on themselves,
their companies or organiza-
tion.
The Chamber will give a
Woman of the Year, Man of
the Year, Large Business of
the Year, Small Business of
the Year and Organization of
the Year award.
The silent auction will
provide a forum for local
businesses and organiza-
tions to showcase their
services, goods or prod-
ucts. This year a table of
Valentine gifts will be fea-
tured. “We do the silent
auction as a fund raiser
for the Chamber, but it also
functions as a way for atten-
tion to be drawn to a
business. Your message
can come across loud and
clear with the selection of
the right item,” noted
Michelle Finney of Mr.
Fix It, subcommittee co-
chair for the Silent Auction.
“Certainly anyone in the
community may contribute
to the silent auction and any-
one in the community may
attend the Winter Banquet,”
noted Nina Castaldi of
Simmons First Bank (for-
merly Metropolitan Bank),
co-chair for the auction.
The menu for the night,
catered by Dinner’s Ready,
is Beef Tenderloin Tips with
White
Wine/Mushroom reduc-
tion, Roasted Yukon Gold
Potatoes, Green Beans
Almondine, salad, rolls,
French Vanilla Silk or
Strawberry Whipped Cake.
Tickets are $30.00 per
individual or $28.00 each if a
table of eight is reserved.
Reservations may be
made by calling 501-847-
4702 or sending an email to
raeann@bryantchamer.com.
Tickets are still available
for the 41st Annual Winter
Banquet and Silent Auction
on Tuesday, Jan. 21 at The
Center at Bishop at 6 p.m.
However Monday is the last
day for ticket sales. “We are
not in the office on Tuesday.
We will be at the Center
setting up. So, if you want
tickets, call Monday,” noted
Rae Ann Fields, Chamber
Executive Director.
Tickets
From page 1
LAS VEGAS — Federal
officials have designated por-
tions of 11 drought-ridden
western and central states
as primary natural disaster
areas, highlighting the finan-
cial strain the lack of rain is
likely to bring to farmers in
those regions.
The announcement by
the U.S. Department of
Agriculture on Wednesday
included counties in
Colorado, New Mexico,
Nevada, Kansas, Texas,
Utah, Arkansas, Hawaii,
Idaho, Oklahoma and
California.
The designation means eli-
gible farmers can qualify for
low-interest emergency loans
from the department.
Agriculture Secretary Tom
Vilsack said he and President
Obama want to ensure that
agriculture remains a bright
spot in the nation’s economy.
“USDA stands with you
and your communities when
severe weather and natural
disasters threaten to disrupt
your livelihood.” he said in
statement.
Counties adjacent to those
affected also are eligible for
assistance.
While storms have
dumped rain and snow in the
East, droughts are persisting
or intensifying in the West,
according to officials con-
nected with the U.S. Drought
Monitor, an index on which
the USDA’s declarations are
based. A ridge of high pres-
sure is to blame for keeping
storms off the Pacific coast
and guiding
them to the
East.
“What we’re seeing meteo-
rologically is a blocking pat-
tern that is deflecting all the
storms,” said Brian Fuchs,
a climatologist with the
Lincoln, Neb.-based National
Drought Mitigation Center.
“There really hasn’t been a
lot of indication that this pat-
tern is breaking down.”
Poor snowpack is threat-
ening regions dependent on
major western rivers, and
no amount of wet winter
weather in the East can ease
the pain, officials said.
“Once you cross the
Rockies, nothing on the East
is going to help you,” Fuchs
said.
The dry weather could
mean an active fire season.
Southern California had an
early taste of that with a
blaze that started Thursday
morning in the foothills of
the San Gabriel Mountains.
Drought prompts disaster declarations
Associated Press
Saturday, January 18, 2014
The Saline Courier 3
501-455-0501
501-454-1095
We Accept Visa, MasterCard & Discover
16220 Alexander Rd.
Alexander, AR 72002
Checks & We Ofer Layaway
Mon.-Fri.
10-6
Sat. 10-4
“Arkansas’ Original & Leading Mattress Warehouse”
My Furniture Warehouse
Pillow Top
Mattress Sets
starting at
$
89
Huge
Rug Sale
No Credit Check
Financing Available
salinecountylibrary.org
BOSWELL LIBRARY - BRYANT
201 Prickett Road
M W F-9-5:30; T Th-9-8; Sat-9-4
501-847-2166
HERZFELD LIBRARY - BENTON
1800 Smithers Drive
M W Th-9-8; T F-9-5:30; Sat-9-4
501-778-4766
One-Day Used Book Sale
Bob Herzfeld
Memorial Library
Saturday, Jan. 25
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
All proceeds benefit Saline County Library
programming. Call 778-4766 or visit
salinecountylibrary.org for more information.
ART STUDIO AND GALLERY
145 W.South St., Benton
(old Gingles’ store)
501-860-7467
www.drartstudio.com
“Scenes from Saline”
Historical Series
Saline County Courthouse • Gann House
Gann Doctors Offce • Shoppach House
Prints and Notecards also available!
501-778-3717
115 E. Cross Street in Benton
www.billsflowershop.com
Bil ’s
Flower Shop
50% off
Fall Silks
Visit Our Website
www.jeffselfpoolsandspas.com
•Above ground pools
•Inground pools
•lIners
•repAIr & servIce
•chemIcAls
•pArts
•sAles
Jeff Self
pools & spas
(501)847-6990
phone
(501)847-8816
FAx
OBITUARIES
PAID OBITUARY
Christine Sweeten Huggins
Christine Sweeten Huggins
“All things pink” would be the perfect way
to describe Christine Huggins. Pink roses,
pink clothes, pink dishes, pink earrings, pink
handbag, pink whatever; if it was pink, it was
made for her.
Christine Sweeten Huggins, 92, of Bedford,
Texas, was born at home in Grant County on
Dec. 1, 1921, to Lonnie E. and Leah Rucker
Sweeten. Shortly thereafter, the family moved
to Bauxite.
Christine proudly called Bauxite home
all of her life. Due to life circumstances, she
moved to Bedford, Texas, in 2005. It was
there in Bedford where she peacefully depart-
ed this life and entered into the presence of
God on January 15, 2014.
Christine was married to the love of her
life for just over 50 years — William Steed
Huggins. Many times she pondered the ques-
tion as to why God saw fit to bless her with
such a fine Christian husband. Steed and
Christine worked side by side for the U.S.
Postal Service in Bauxite where she retired
after 27 years of service as a postal clerk.
Christine loved to cook and loved to enter-
tain. Events in her home always consisted
of great food, loud talking, much laughter,
Desert Rose china, silver, crystal and cloth
napkins. And everyone was welcomed. The
more the merrier!
For as long as her health allowed,
Christine was a faithful and active member
of Indian Springs Baptist Church. There was
no doubt she loved her church. While her
body may have moved to Texas, her heart
was always with her Indian Springs Church
family. Thanksgiving gatherings, Dickens
Christmas weekends, anniversaries and par-
ties, or cruises, Christine lived for these spe-
cial times of memory making adventures with
her family and friends.
Family was important to her and she trea-
sured each person in their own unique way.
But the absolute delight of her life was her
granddaughter, Ann Elizabeth. Yes, Christine
was a very proud grandmother.
She was preceded in death by her parents;
her husband, William Steed Huggins; one sis-
ter, Doris Baxley; and three brothers, Lowell,
Euell and Paul Sweeten.
Christine is survived by her son, William
Steed Huggins Jr. and wife Lynne of
Colleyville, Texas; a granddaughter, Ann
Elizabeth Beggs and husband Randy; and a
great-granddaughter, Lilly Grace Beggs; a
brother Nathan Sweeten of Galveston, Texas;
a sister, Virgie Caple and husband Eldridge
of Warrensburg, Mo.; sisters-in-law, Marilyn
Sweeten of Houston, Texas, and Angie Miller
of Little Rock; and numerous nieces and
nephews.
A celebration of Christine’s life will be held
at 10 a.m. Monday, Jan. 20 in the chapel of
Ashby Funeral Home. Officiating at the ser-
vice will be the Revs. Benny Grant and Tom
Williams and Randy Beggs. Visitation will be
held from 6 to 8 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 19, at the
funeral home.
Burial will be at Mt. Olive Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made
to the Bauxite Museum, 6706 Benton Road,
Bauxite, AR 72011.
Online guest book: www.ashbyfuneral-
home.com.
Jimmy Duane McGee
Jimmy Duane McGee, 51, formerly of
Benton, passed away at his Dallas, Texas,
home on Dec. 31, 2013. He was a graduate of
Texas A & M.
Jimmy worked in the computer industry.
Jimmy was preceded in death by his
father, Jimmy Roy McGee; and both sets of
grandparents, the McGees and Maddoxes
He is survived by his mother, Linda
Cooper of Benton; his stepmother, Margaret
McGee of Conroe, Texas; his brother and sis-
ter-in-law, Brian and Norma McGee, and their
children, Jaylee, Shanie, and Riley McGee;
a half-brother and his son, Eric and Corbin
Cooper of Benton; and many aunts, uncles
and cousins, who will miss him greatly.
A memorial and visitation service will be
held from 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 19, in the
fellowship hall of First United Methodist
Church, 200 N. Market St.
Ashby Funeral Home is in charge of
arrangements.
Daniel ‘Danny’ Davis
Daniel “Danny” Davis, age 64, of Benton
passed away Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2014. He was
born March 14, 1949, in Hopper, the son of
William Caleb Davis and Sarah Price Davis.
On Jan. 1, 1979, he was married to Marta
Pipkin.
Danny was a 1966 graduate of Caddo
Gap High School and a 1971 graduate of
Henderson State University, where he set
and achieved many outstanding records.
While at Henderson, he was a member of the
Reddies basketball team, where he scored
2,075 points in his basketball career, averag-
ing 18 points per game. During the 1968-
1969 season he averaged 21 points and 8.3
rebounds per game. He maintains the second
all-time scoring in school history, with 974
rebounds, with 8.5 average per game and was
third in career rebounds.
He was All Conference for the years 1969,
1970, 1971, NAIA All-District for the years
1969, 1970, 1971, NAIA All Tournament Team
in 1969 and NAIA All-American for 1969,
1970 and 1971. He scored 105 points in four
games in the national tournament, averaging
26.25 points per game.
In the summer of 1969, Danny was one
of 12 players selected to tour Africa and
Europe on behalf of the USA and in 1971 he
was selected as Senior Athlete at Henderson
State University. As a senior he connected
on 61 percent of his shots, ranked in the Top
Ten nationally and in one stretch connected
for double figures in more than 50 games
for over three seasons. He was selected
in Round 7 by the New York Knicks of the
NBA.
Danny was inducted into Henderson’s Hall
of Honor in 1998 and in Jan 29, 2005 his jer-
sey was retired and continues to hang from
the gym at Henderson. No other player will
ever wear Danny’s jersey.
After leaving college and going into the
working field, for many years he was a coach,
teacher and school administrator for area
schools in Arkansas, where he impacted
many young people’s lives and will be
remembered by young and old for years to
come.
While Danny achieved many outstanding
honors in his lifetime, his greatest and most
precious gift was his daughter, Lauren, whom
he dearly loved with all his heart. He was a
wonderful husband and father and was loved
and cherished by his family. His daughter
knew she was the luckiest girl in the world to
have been blessed with having had the “best
daddy” anyone could ever ask for. He will
truly be missed by all that knew and loved
him, but his memory will live on in their
hearts forever.
He was preceded in death by his parents;
and three sisters, Jean Davis Coleman,
Mary Ellen Davis and Gloria Davis. He is
survived by his loving wife, Marta Davis of
Benton; his daughter, the true light of his
life, Lauren Clow, and her husband, Degen,
of Little Rock; his newest pride and joy, his
grandson, Davis Clow of Little Rock; his
siblings, Helen Robinson of Bokoshe, Okla.,
Wilburn Davis of San Marcus, Texas, Faye
George of Spring, Texas, Bonnie Reid of
Sugarland, Texas, Nelda Walker of Giddings,
Texas, James and Karen Davis of Midwest
City, Okla., and Frank and Judy Davis of
Edmondson, Okla.; numerous nieces and
nephews; and many wonderful friends.
A celebration of Danny’s Life will be held
at 1 p.m., Saturday, Jan. 18, in the Davis-
Smith Funeral Home Chapel in Glenwood
with Frank Davis and James Davis officiating.
Honorary pallbearers are Ron Dunning, Gary
Tackett, Carl Coffman and James Boley.
A private family graveside service will be
held.
In lieu of flowers, memorials to honor
Danny may be made to the Hopper Cemetery
Fund, in care of Mary Hollifield, 45 Hollifield
Lane, Caddo Gap, AR 71935.
Online registry: www.davis-smith.com.
The Benton Senior
Activity and Wellness Center
will be closed Monday, Jan.
20, in observance of Dr.
Martin L. King Jr. Day.
Commodities were dis-
tributed recently to eligible
seniors at the center.
The next date for com-
modity distribution is
Thursday, Feb. 6, from 9 to
11 a.m. and noon to 3 p.m.
Recipients should bring
boxes to collect their foods.
Lawrence Savage pre-
sented his second Thursday
music program which
included 30 minutes of
hymns and 30 minutes of
country music. It was a very
good presentation.
Participants enjoyed enter-
tainment by the Country
Ramblers on Monday morn-
ing, the Sock Shuffle on
Tuesday, Nutrition Class on
Thursday, and the Pickin’
and Grinnin’ Dance on
Friday.
We are always happy to
see the returning members
who have been away for a
while. They are the ones
who are faithful and see the
importance of attending and
sharing life at the center as
often as possible. Such was
the case when Bob Whittier
returned. Bob has spent
time hospitalized, and we are
happy to welcome him back.
We also enjoyed the com-
pany of Rodney and Caroline
Goshen when they stopped
by to visit. We have many
whose health is somewhat
compromised and they still
hang with us as often as they
can.
It is a concern to me
that the seniors seem to be
neglected by the candidates
as I have seen relatively few
candidates solicit votes from
the seniors since my return.
One gentleman is sug-
gesting a “Constitutional
Sheriff.” I
am very interested in
knowing more about his
ideas.
Seniors and their welfare
are always of interest to me.
When the snow and ice
hit Saline County during
December, I wondered
about the isolated seniors
of our area. Later when we
returned to the center, I
had occasion to watch as
a senior was returned by
center transportation) to her
home. I was appalled as her
entrance ramp was covered
with a solid sheet of icy
snow.
The following morning I
was on the same bus which
picked her
up. As she left the bus
after lunch, I told her I was
calling her
church to ask someone to
aid her. I did so and some-
one was very quick to check
on her.
Another member did not
fare so well. This person also
tried to walk down a
ramp into his yard, falling
and injuring himself. He
developed complications and
passed away.
Last Thursday a week
ago, I walked down my own
ramp and slipped, just short
of the end. (The upper end
was dry.) I was fortunate,
being followed by my son.
I was picked up, assessed
myself and was able to con-
tinue across the yard to my
ride.
This Monday I walked the
same path. No bad weather
this time, just a tad of frost
on the grass. I slipped again,
on invisible icy wood. This
time I fell to the opposite
side, twisting both my ankle
and knee, not to mention the
tendons, muscles and all the
hinges in my body.
This is reality in the life
of a senior. I am extremely
fortunate to have the care
and support of family and
friends; nevertheless,
accidents do happen and I
rested at home the remain-
der of this week waiting for
my doctor’s appointment on
Friday afternoon. If you are
aware of a senior in your
area, check on the indi-
vidual if you can. Seniors are
important even if we are a
bit sluggish at times.
Meals at the center for the
coming week, Jan. 21-24, will
include:
•Monday- Center closed
to observe Martin Luther
King Jr.
•Tuesday: Beef Stew,
Spinach, Spiced Peaches,
Roll, Brownie.
•Wednesday: Ham and
Lima Beans, Cabbage with
Carrots, Onions, Cornbread,
Pineapple Upside Cake.
•Thursday: Taco Salad,
Lettuce/Tomato/Cheese,
Spanish Rice, Peaches,
Vanilla Pudding.
•Friday: Pinto Beans
with ham, Mixed Greens,
Roasted Potatoes, Mexican
Cornbread, Peach Parfait.
The center is at 210
Jefferson St.
Center to close for M. L. K. observance
By Jo Hawkins
LITTLE ROCK —
Arkansas Department of
Human Services officials
told legislators Thursday
that they're planning the fis-
cal 2015 budget under the
assumption that the General
Assembly will continue a
Medicaid expansion plan
that provides low-income
residents with private health
insurance.
DHS Director John Selig
said before the Joint Budget
Committee that the agency
isn't asking for an increase
in what it receives in state
general revenue but does
intend to shift some posi-
tions around to better allo-
cate its resources.
"We knew that budgets
were very tight," Selig said.
The agency administers
the Medicaid program and
oversees numerous state
offices, from the Health
Department to services for
the blind, to programs for
children, families and the
elderly. DHS has more than
7,000 employees and an
overall budget of about $5.4
billion.
State Director of Medical
Services Andy Allison said
the Medicaid program
received $400 million from
the federal government in
the current fiscal year to
fund the private health insur-
ance option. If the program
continues in fiscal 2015, that
number will grow to $1.5 bil-
lion in federal money.
The private option nar-
rowly passed the Republican-
dominated House and
Senate last year and will be
subject to approval again in
the fiscal session that begins
Feb. 10. Democratic Gov.
Mike Beebe said earlier in
the week, after Republicans
picked up another Senate
seat in a special election,
that he thinks the private
option will be a tough sell,
but that it can pass.
More than 87,000
Arkansas residents have got-
ten health insurance under
the federal health overhaul
law, including about 60,000
through the private option,
Allison said.
One of the goals of the
program is to move eligible
individuals and families from
the traditional Medicaid pro-
gram, which provides health
coverage for the state's poor-
est residents, into private
option coverage.
People with incomes
below 138 percent of the
poverty line don't have
to pay for the coverage.
Those earning above the
cutoff receive subsidized
insurance, with payments
growing as an earner's
income rises. Health savings
accounts can help people
budget for their insurance
payments, Allison said.
DHS presents budget to lawmakers
Associated Press
“Congress shall make no law ... abridging the freedom
of speech, or of the press ... .”
— From the First Amendment to Constitution
G
overnor Chris Christie saying, “I am not
a bully” -- and he actually did speak those
very words -- is as credible as former
President Richard Nixon saying, “I’m not a crook.”
Yet embattled Gov. Christie is a bully, in the sense
that he picks on people who are less powerful than
he is -- if not by picking on the mayor of a relatively
small town, then by bulldozing individual teachers
or regular citizens who dare to dispute him at public
meetings.
“Bridgegate” is important because it involves more
than politicians fighting with one
another. It involves political appoin-
tees (and, quite possibly, their gover-
nor boss) who punish an adversary
by taking it out on regular citizens,
making them hours late to work and
school and making it more difficult
to get medical assistance, like an
ambulance. One ambulance driver
had to jump a curb and drive around
a Christie-aide-caused traffic jam to
reach a car crash involving multiple
passengers.
The first “gate” scandal was
Watergate. As the saying goes, Watergate was worse
than a crime; it was a fruitless crime because Nixon
would have won by a landslide without spying on his
opponents. The same goes for Bridgegate. There was
no political gain here, only spite.
Gov. Christie would have won by a landslide with-
out trying to intimidate the Democratic mayor of
Fort Lee, N.J. He won the majority of women, half of
Hispanics, and one-third of all Democrats. There may
be something about being on the way to winning by
a landslide that makes politicians more reckless and
arrogant. (I wouldn’t know about how landslides dis-
tort one’s judgment, since I ran Al Gore’s 2000 presi-
dential campaign that was decided by a few hundred
disputed votes in Florida).
Christie is in a no-win position. Either he didn’t
know what his staff members were doing, which
means he’s a poor administrator, or Christie did
know (or at least set the tone), which means he’s
unfit to be governor, much less president.
I find it a red flag that Gov. Christie’s own account
shows a passive attitude toward gross misconduct.
As he tells it, he gave his staffers one hour to confess
to any wrongdoing, and if no one confessed, then
he’d tell the press his office had nothing to do with
the traffic jam. Did he really expect guilty aides to
confess, when he’d just told them their silence would
be accepted as being innocent? Is this the approach
former prosecutor Christie would have taken to a
wrongdoing?
Journalists immediately noticed when Christie, in
his State of the State address, used the passive voice
to talk about his responsibility in Bridgegate, saying,
“Mistakes were made.” Twitter lit up. Politico colum-
nist Roger Simon tweeted: “Bridges were blocked.
Revenge was taken.”
This scandal severely damages Chris Christie’s
brand, that he is a show-no-favors, no-nonsense
administrator, a bipartisan leader. If several of your
most trusted staff members, including your deputy
chief of staff, go rogue without you catching on, then
are you competent enough to be president -- or even
governor? If you’re that tone-deaf to your staff’s dis-
torted values, how can you even be a federal prosecu-
tor (as Christie was)?
The essential quality that made Christie, a mod-
erate Republican from New Jersey, plausible as a
presidential candidate was that he was not a tradi-
tional inside-the-beltway politician. This would go
well against an immoderate right-wing primary field,
and in a party that is stridently anti-Washington. But
what is moderate about a four-day traffic jam that
he handled by giving his staffers an escape hatch --
keeping silent?
Christie’s fervent struggle with weight loss, his
brash, straight talk, his “let’s fix this now” demeanor
gave him a crossover appeal.
Directly culpable or not for Bridgegate, Christie is
nonetheless stained by running a political operation
that “fixes” opponents -- to the detriment of the peo-
ple he serves. He became a traditional Washington
insider politician, out for himself, and that will make
him unappealing to the Republican primary audience
for whom Washington is a foreign country.
The point isn’t that the governor’s staff went
rogue; the point is that the governor either hadn’t a
clue or went to sleep or went to Iowa (well ahead to
the first contest in 2016). Actually, he’ll soon be on
his way to Florida, a state that plays a vital role in the
early primary process.
It’s too early to tell if this is the last we will hear
from the governor.
Donna Brazile is a commentator for CNN.
T
he power of history to speak
to us depends on our ability
to hear it. When we are deaf
to its secrets, or too confused or con-
ditioned to decipher them, we miss
the opportunity to be empowered by
them. We thus fail to overcome the
propaganda our own government,
like the dictatorships
we revile, has all too
often deceived us
with.
I am struck by this
aura of static around
a sensational new
discovery. Researcher
and author Krystyna
Piorkowska, The
Associated Press
reported this week,
has unearthed a “lost”
U.S. document, dating
back to 1945, known as the Van Vliet
report on the Katyn Forest Massacre.
Few Americans are familiar with the
World-War-II-era massacre, let alone
with U.S. Army Lt. Col. John H. Van
Vliet, so what is history telling us?
Its message is one that we as a
people are deeply conditioned to
reject. It concerns decades of U.S.
appeasement, support and collu-
sion regarding the USSR, and even
in some of the evil empire’s worst
atrocities. In “American Betrayal,”
I re-examine this terrible pattern,
long obscured by false narratives of
the “good war” that I learned along
with everybody else, for evidence of
Soviet agents’ influence on U.S. strat-
egy. Equally important is the corro-
sive impact this subversion has had
on our nation’s character. Nowhere
is this moral impact more evident
than at Katyn.
This chapter of the story begins
when Van Vliet and other prisoners
of war held by Nazi Germany were
brought by German officials to the
Katyn Forest near Smolensk, Russia
to watch the exhumation of thou-
sands of executed Poles, mainly offi-
cers, from mass graves discovered
there in 1943. The evidence Van Vliet
saw convinced him he was looking at
a Soviet atrocity of colossal propor-
tions. As part of Stalin’s diabolical
plans to Sovietize Poland, the Soviets
liquidated 20,000 Polish POWs in
1940, a time when this region was
under USSR occupation following the
Soviet invasion of Poland in tandem
with Nazi Germany in 1939.
By 1943, however, the U.S. and
Great Britain had struck a military
alliance with the communist dictator-
ship against the Nazi dictatorship. At
the time of the massacre’s discovery,
Stalin instantly blamed Hitler. Much
more importantly, so did FDR and
Churchill. Did they know the truth
about their murderous ally (Stalin)
against their murderous enemy
(Hitler)? Did they want to know the
truth?
We know that a British diplomat
named Owen O’Malley was dis-
patched to study the war crime in
the spring of 1943. O’Malley wrote
a remarkable report for the British
government concluding the Soviets
were guilty. We know Churchill gave
this report to Roosevelt that same
summer. Former Pennsylvania gov-
ernor George H. Earle, Roosevelt’s
personal emissary, would testify
that he presented evidence of Soviet
guilt at Katyn to Roosevelt person-
ally in 1944. FDR wasn’t buying it.
Meanwhile, “we mustn’t offend the
Russians,” went the internal govern-
ment mantra, confounding truth,
morality and, I argue, U.S. strategy.
As a result, both the U.S. and Great
Britain would peddle Soviet lies
about Katyn throughout the war.
The Office of War Information, a
wartime U.S. government agency we
now know was riddled with Soviet
agents, was a strong arm for this pro-
paganda.
U.S. support for the Big Lie about
Katyn, however, continued long after
the war -- which is where the Van
Vliet report comes in.
At war’s end, newly liberated Van
Vliet sped home with his eyewitness
account of Soviet guilt. On May 22,
1945, Van Vliet presented what he
knew directly to the head of military
intelligence, Gen. Clayton Bissell.
The general tagged the report Top
Secret, and, as Van Vliet later told
Congress during its investigation of
Katyn in the early 1950s, “then dictat-
ed the letter directing me to silence.”
Silence. When we see the past as
a struggle between silence -- which
includes cover-up -- and revelation,
a new pattern of understanding
takes shape. Why was the truth of
Soviet guilt at Katyn suppressed until
Congress ferreted it out in 1952?
What impact did this have on the
advance of communism in the world?
What or whose cause did silence
serve? Not the causes of truth or
freedom, to be sure. Meanwhile, it
is this silenced, American eyewit-
ness account of Soviet guilt at Katyn
that became known as the Van Vliet
report. From the moment congres-
sional investigators began looking
for it in the early 1950s until now, the
report has been missing.
In fact, that same report Van Vliet
dictated on May 22, 1945 is still
missing. What Krystyna Piorkowska
discovered is a sworn deposition by
Van Vliet dated May 10, 1945. As the
testament of America’s most famous
witness to Katyn’s toll, this docu-
ment found by Piorkowska, author
of “English-Speaking Witnesses to
Katyn,” is highly significant.
Van Vliet was not the only impor-
tant American witness at Katyn.
Army Capt. Donald B. Stewart
was there, too, and, according to
declassified documents Piorkowska
uncovered last year, Stewart sent a
coded message in 1943 to military
intelligence (Gen. Bissell, who later
debriefed Van Vliet) indicating that
he and Van Vliet believed the Soviets
were guilty of the massacre. In other
words, U.S. brass received eyewit-
ness information in real time.
It gets worse. In 2012, writing
about Piorkowska’s earlier Katyn
findings, the AP reported: “The
newly discovered documents also
show Stewart was ordered in 1950
-- soon before the congressional
committee began its work -- never
to speak about a secret message on
Katyn.”
History is telling us that more than
Polish bodies are buried there.
Diana West can be contacted via
dianawest@verizon.net. Follow her on
Twitter @diana_west_.
The secrets of Katyn
Forest: What is really
burired there?
EDITORIAL CARTOON
I
’ve been giving the Chris Christie
mess a lot of thought this week and
have come to some tentative conclu-
sions. But first, I should explain where I
am in my analysis.
As most people know, Sam Ed Gibson
is my close friend, professional mentor,
and former law partner. But wait. That’s,
uh, General Gibson to you. Yes, in his
other life, he is a retired brigadier general
in the U. S. Army Reserve,
having done tours of active
duty in two war zones:
Kuwait and Bosnia. He has
related his experiences in
both wars, and from his
description, it is obvious
that leading men (and a
few women) into battle is
sobering and sometimes
even terrifying.
The general is a gradu-
ate of Command and
General Staff School and
the Army War College,
but even before that train-
ing, he relates, he began
to hear the term among
senior officers that he has
never forgotten: Command Climate.
What kind of example are officers in
senior leadership setting for young people
in the enlisted ranks as well as for young
officers? What can reasonably be inferred
from their demeanor, their swagger, their
bellicosity (hopefully, a lack thereof),
their attention to administrative detail,
their idea of fundamental fairness toward
their subordinates? Senior leaders must
be aware at all time not only of their code
of conduct. They must also be aware of
their tone of conduct.
In case you’ve been vacationing on
Mars, I’ll review what went down in New
Jersey. The Christie staffers got it in
their minds that retaliation was in order
for past political misdeeds. They figured
that a traffic jam across the George
Washington Bridge (linking Fort Lee
and New York City) would be suitable
payback.
It’s unclear who the target was, but the
national press theorizes that it was either
the mayor of Fort Lee for not endorsing
Christie or the Democratic Speaker of the
House from that area for participating in
the effort to block the reappointment of a
Republican Supreme Court Justice.
Accordingly, Deputy Chief of Staff
Bridget Anne Kelly and Port Authority
member David Wildstein orchestrated the
closing of two of the three lanes, think-
ing it would blow back on their intended
Democratic target. It lasted from Sept. 9
through Sept. 13, and although it back-
fired politically, it did cause a massive
traffic jam – so much so that first respond-
ers could not even get through to save
the life of an elderly dying man.
When it came to light, Christie
terminated Kelly, whose e-mail said
to Wildstein, “Time for some traffic
problems in Fort Lee.” Several others
resigned. Indictments, both state and fed-
eral, will no doubt follow, and should.
I will stipulate, as lawyers like to say,
that Christie had absolutely no prior
knowledge of this horrific incident. From
all accounts, the governor is an honorable
and honest person. Unfortunately, the
default position of the national press is
to disbelieve, and not believe, embattled
political figures.
But even if he is telling the truth,
one must ask: What was the Command
Climate in the New Jersey Governor’s
office? What kind of Command Climate
was the governor fostering when he
called members of the New Jersey leg-
islature “animals”? Isn’t that the kind of
bellicosity that quality Command Climate
discourages?
And what of Christie’s swagger and
demeanor? Should governors get into
shouting matches with reporters, or even
private citizens, when asked questions
they take personal exception to? Has the
governor set a tone of conduct that is a
positive example for our young people?
Alas, Gov. Christie gets failing grades
in most aspects of Command Climate.
The general would no doubt disapprove.
So should we.
George D. Ellis is chairman of the
Democratic Party of Saline County.
Christie’s
Command
Climate
‘I am not a bully’
• The Saline Courier (USPS 050-660) is published daily by Horizon Publishing Co., 321
N. Market St., Benton, AR. Periodical mailing privileges paid in Benton, AR.
• Subscription rates: $7 to $9 per month home delivery (depends on payment plan); $95
per year home delivery; $150 per year by mail within the state or out-of-state.
• POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Saline Courier, P.O. Box 207, Benton,
AR 72018.
• Publishing company reserves the right to reject, edit or cancel any advertising at any time
without liability. Publisher’s liability for error is limited to amount paid for advertising.
©Copyright 2006 Horizon Publishing Co.
Columns and cartoons on the opinion page do not necessarily reflect
opinions of The Saline Courier. Weekend delivery times are no later than
7 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. The circulation department has re-delivery
scheduled from 5 to 7 p.m. Monday-Friday and from 7 to 9 a.m. Saturday
and Sunday. Call 501-317-6013 or 501-315-8228 during business hours.
THE SALINE COURIER
Founded in 1876
Phone: (501) 315-8228 • Fax: (501) 315-1230 • Email: news@bentoncourier.com
ANDREW STOVALL
CIRCULATION DIRECTOR
astovall@bentoncourier.com
DAVID WILLS
ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
dwills@bentoncourier.com
PATRICIA STUCKEY
COMPOSING DIRECTOR
composing@bentoncourier.com
RICKY WALTERS
PRESS FOREMAN
rwalters@bentoncourier.com
STEVE BOGGS • Publisher
publisher@bentoncourier.com
BRENT DAVIS • editor
bdavis@bentoncourier.com
DIANA
WEST
DONNA
BRAZILE
Page 4 – The Saline Courier
news@bentoncourier.com Saturday, January 18, 2014
OPINION
GEORGE D.
ELLIS
IN MY
HUMBLE
OPINION
Breaking news
www.bentoncourier.com
Today in history
Today is the 18th day of 2014 and the
29th day of winter.
TODAY’S HISTORY: In 1788, English
settlers landed in Australia to establish a
penal colony.
In 1943, the first armed uprising began
at the Warsaw Ghetto in German-occupied
Poland.
In 1964, planners unveiled the designs
for New York’s World Trade Center.
In 1993, Martin Luther King Jr. Day
was officially observed in all 50 states for
the first time.
Saturday, January 18, 2014
sports@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page 5
SPORTS
What we are offering this
year:
4/5- Instructional
6u- Coach Pitch
8u-Machine Pitch
10u- Machine Pitch and
Live Arm
12u- Slow and Fast Pitch
LA
14/16- Slow and Fast Pitch
LA
2014 Spring Reg. Dates
Jan 19 Pre-Registration
Feb. 1 - Open - 8 am -1 pm
Feb. 2 - Open - 12 p.m. -4
Feb. 8 - Open - 8 am - 1 pm
Feb. 9 - Open - 12 pm -4pm
We will be accepting all
registrations at the Center
at Bishop Park on the above
dates.
We will have early regis-
tration this year to give our
girls more time to practice
before league starts.
Spring League Games will
start March 31.
Registration Fees -
$45 per player
2 siblings- $75 for both
3 or more siblings- $10 per
player after 2.
4/5 yr olds- FREE reg.
This year we are offering
two FREE clinics to every
girl that signs up with us to
play spring ball.
BRYANT SOFTBALL
SIGNUPS
Girls softball signups
deadline for team regis-
tration is set for Feb. 18.
Deadline for individuals is
Feb. 25. Games start March
31. No games the week of
April 7-11 due to benchmark
testing. Please call 776-5970
to have a registration form
emailed to you or visit the
Benton Parks and Recreation
Facebook page or visit the
office at 913 E. Sevier St. in
Benton. Cost to play is $35
for 6U and $45 for all others.
There is a $10 discount for
siblings. Mail registration
form and fee to the Benton
parks office. For more infor-
mation, email:
stickweaver68@yahoo.
com
BENTON SOFTBALL
SIGNUPS
SALINE
SCOREBOARD
FRIDAY
Basketball
Benton vs. Sheridan, late
Bryant vs. LR Fair, late
Bauxite vs. Ark. Bapt., late
BHG at Glen Rose, late
Check SalineCourierSports on
Twitter or Facebook for final
scores.
Salem Ballpark will be
having baseball and softball
signups for ages 4 through
16. Children must be the age
of 4 by April 30. Signups will
be:
Saturday, Jan. 25 from 9
a.m. to noon
Tuesday, Jan. 28 from 6
p.m. to 8 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 30 from 6
p.m. to 8 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 1 from 9
a.m. to noon.
Signups are free to all new
players. A birth certificate is
required at the time of sign-
ing up.
Cost to play is:
$50 for 1 player
$60 for 2 players
$75 for 3 players
An additional $10 fee will
be added for signups that
are placed after Feb. 1. For
more information call Ron
Blackburn for baseball at
847-3727 or Beverly Neal for
softball at 425-0600. More
information and pre-registra-
tion forms can be found and
www.salemballpark.com.
SALEM BASEBALL/
SOFTBALL SIGNUPS
Playing together key for Hogs
Senior
Arkansas
Razorbacks
forward
Coty Clarke
hustles for
a ball in the
Razorbacks’
87-85 vic-
tory over No.
13 Kentucky
Wildcats
on Tuesday
night at Bud
Walton Arena
in Fayetteville.
But the
Razorbacks
go on the
road today,
where they
are 2-15 the
past two sea-
sons, to face
the Georgia
Bulldogs in
Athens, Ga.,
today at 12:30
p.m.
GUNNAR RATHBUN/
Special to The Saline
Courier
FAYETTEVILLE - In
large part, Mike Anderson
believes his Razorbacks
upended No. 13 Kentucky
87-85 in overtime Tuesday
at Walton through what
they learned the previous
game from losing to Florida
84-82 in overtime at Walton.
Now as Arkansas, 12-4,
1-2 in the SEC, readies to
meet the Georgia Bulldogs,
8-7, 2-1 in the SEC at 12:30
p.m. (CST) today on the
SEC-TV Network from
Georgia’s Stegeman
Coliseum in Athens, Ga.,
Anderson again wants
his Razorbacks learning
from a past game. Not the
Kentucky game, though of
course Anderson hopes for
carryover into Athens.
It’s the lessons Anderson
hopes were learned from
the 69-53 nightmare SEC-
opening loss on Jan. 8
at Texas A&M that the
coach wants embedded in
his Razorbacks’ minds as
they take the Stegeman
Coliseum floor.
“It gives us an opportuni-
ty to go on the road and get
out of the confines of Bud
Walton Arena and see if we
have learned something
about our basketball team
through conference play,”
Anderson said. “We have
already played at A&M.
Hopefully that gives us an
understanding of what it
takes to go on the road and
play well. We have got to
play with energy and we
have got to play well and
have the mindset that we
are all we have got and we
ARKANSAS (12-4, 1-2)
Ht. Yr. Pts. Reb.
F-Coty Clarke, 6-7 Sr. 8.3 5.3
C-Bobby Portis 6-10 Fr. 12.4 6.6
G-Fred Gulley 6-2 Sr. 3.9 1.5
G-Ky Madden 6-5 Jr. 11.7 2.2
G-Michael Qualls 6-6 So. 13.0 5.0
GEORGIA (8-7, 2-1)
F-Nemanja Djurisic 6-8 Jr. 10.1 4.1
F-Marcus Thornton 6-8 Jr. 7.0 5.1
F-Donte Williams 6-9 Sr. 8.7 5.1
G-Kenny Gaines 6-3 So. 11.7 2.3
G-Charles Mann 6-5 So. 13.6 3.4
Starting Lineup
JULIE COMBS/Special to The Saline Courier
Bryant swimmer Jacey Bittle competes in the 100-yard backstroke
in the Braynt january Invite on Thursday at Bishop Park Natatorium.
Bittle finished in 15th place in a time of 1:18.74 for two points as
the Lady Hornets finished in first place with 333.5 points. Conway
took second with 314 points and Benton took eighth with 119
points. In the boys’ meet, Bryant finished with 236 poiints for third
place and Benton took ninth with 117 points.
BACKWARD MOTION
By Nate Allen
Razorback Report
RAZORBACKS, page 6
Boldin-Crabtree wideout
tandem tough on defenses
ENGLEWOOD, Colo. —
Of all the decisions coach
John Fox made that kept
the Denver Broncos rolling
through a drama-filled season,
one was an absolute life-saver.
Instead of going out on his
fishing boat for some solitude
during his team’s bye week,
Fox decided to play 18 holes
with some buddies some
200 yards from his offseason
home in Charlotte, N.C.
“I’d have been 60 miles
out in the woods,” Fox said.
“They might never have
found me.”
Fox had just seen his car-
diologist in Raleigh, who told
him he’d still be able to delay
his heart operation until after
the Super Bowl so long as
he didn’t feel faint or short of
breath in the meantime.
Fox was born with a genet-
ic defect in his aortic valve,
which regulates blood flow
from the heart into the aorta,
the major blood vessel that
brings blood into the body.
He said it was discovered in
1997 when a murmur showed
up in a physical while he was
the Giants defensive coordina-
tor.
Feeling dizzy, he chipped
within 2 feet for par, then lay
down on the 14th green and,
hardly able to breathe, said
a short prayer: “God you get
me out of this and I’ll get it
fixed now.”
Less than 48 hours later,
on Nov. 4, he underwent
open-heart surgery.
HG to host Region 2
tourney in 3 sports
Fox’s biggest decision
was a life-saver
SANTA CLARA, Calif. —
Anquan Boldin and Michael
Crabtree waited nearly eight
months to finally step on the
field together for game day.
At last, in Week 13, every-
one got to see the dynamic
tandem in San Francisco’s
upgraded receiving corps —
and it didn’t take them long
to discover an impressive
rhythm for a passing game
in serious need of a jolt.
While the emotional
Boldin helped lead the
offense alongside Colin
Kaepernick, Frank Gore
and Vernon Davis early on,
Crabtree worked through
months of rehab after sur-
gery for a torn right Achilles
tendon.
“That was the vision
going in, him on one side,
me on the other, Vernon
working the middle of the
field,” Boldin said. “It’s
tough on defenses when
you have two guys out-
side capable of having big
games, and then you have
Vernon inside matched up
with linebackers. So, it gives
defenses fits.”
Whether the Seahawks’
stellar secondary can be
fooled by this talented trio
during the NFC champi-
onship game Sunday at
Seattle will play a key factor
in which of the archrivals
advances to the Super Bowl.
49ers coach Jim
Harbaugh wondered
whether Crabtree would be
the same dominant player.
Even offensive coordina-
tor Greg Roman had his
doubts it would happen this
season given the severity of
Crabtree’s injury.
“You’ve always got to plan
for the worst-case scenario,”
Roman said Thursday.
“Until I saw him pushing a
sled about a month and a
half ago out here, I realized
it was reality.”
Crabtree quickly
returned to form as some-
one Harbaugh considers
the best pass catcher he
has seen. Crabtree might
celebrate a clutch catch by
pumping his arms, while
Boldin tends to do so by
barking at an opposing
defender.
“That’s just my personal-
ity. It’s always been the way
that I played the game,”
Boldin said. “I was always
told if you don’t play the
game all out, then you’re
cheating yourself.”
To see Crabtree back at
full strength means so much
for San Francisco’s swagger
as the team carries an eight-
game winning streak into
CenturyLink Field.
“You could just see at
every juncture he was hit-
ting right down the middle
of the strike zone in terms
of his healing. And you just
watched the mental tough-
ness, the physical toughness
over that six-month period,”
Harbaugh said. “And then
when he got back on the
field, then even a, ‘Wow,
this is really going to be
good for us.’ And just thank-
ful to him. Thankful that he
went through the grueling
rehab, went through the
toughness, and thankful that
he was good.”
This is the kind of
By Arnie Stapleton
AP Writer
By Janie McCauley
AP Writer
RECEIVERS, page 6
FOX, page 6
HASKELL – Harmony
Grove Athletic Director Ricky
Mooney has put the small
Haskell school on the map in
big ways over the past eight
months. With the addition of
a new football stadium and
a new softball and baseball
complex complete with new
fields and fencing, Mooney
has raised the bar even
higher.
With the second semester
of school comes time to des-
ignate spots for postseason
play for everything other than
football and volleyball.
But for Harmony Grove a
series of surprises and more
excitement is on the horizon
as well. This year the school
will be hosting the Region 2
tournament for basketball,
baseball and softball, accord-
ing to the Arkansas Athletics
Association as of Thursday
night.
“I really thought the base-
ball and softball tournament
would go up north this year
because Glen Rose had it
last year,” Mooney said. “I
was surprised that we got
the baseball and the softball
and then I thought that was
going to hurt us in basketball.
I didn’t know they would give
us all three so it was a good
night.”
Harmony Grove once host-
ed the basketball Regional as
a member of class 2A in 2003
and also hosted the softball
Regional one time after no
one else would agree to host,
according to Mooney.
Mooney said that the
process allowing a school to
host goes through a series of
steps. First, the school has to
fill out paperwork placing a
bid to host a particular sport.
Then the athletic directors
meet before the AAA board
and pitch their case for their
school.
“We were up against
BHG, page 6
By Josh Briggs
jbriggs@bentoncourier.com
6 The Saline Courier
Saturday, January 18, 2014
517 Bird St., Benton
501-315-7213
www.northsidepower.com
Sales • Installation • Service • Maintenance
Since 1978
5405 Hwy 5
Bryant
847-2577
5405
Walk-ins Welcome or call for appointment
Tues - Fri 9-6 & Sat 9-2
• Precision Cuts for the Entire Family
• Specialized Color Services
• Shampoo Sets/Styles
• Perms
Professional
Products
Available
RAZORBACK
SOD
501-315-8340
WE GROW OUR OWN SOD
Delivery or Pick-Up
at
3000 Lilac Circle, Benton Farm TIF
GREEN
INC.
EMBROIDERY & MONOGRAMMING
TARA & SHELBY FAGAN 11657 Interstate 30
(501) 315-6497 Benton, AR 72015
INC.
EMBROIDERY & MONOGRAMMING
TARA & SHELBY FAGAN 11657 Interstate 30
(501) 315-6497 Benton, AR 72015
INC.
EMBROIDERY & MONOGRAMMING
TARA & SHELBY FAGAN 11657 Interstate 30
(501) 315-6497 Benton, AR 72015
INC.
EMBROIDERY & MONOGRAMMING
TARA & SHELBY FAGAN 11657 Interstate 30
(501) 315-6497 Benton, AR 72015
Shutters • Blinds • Shades
-Free Estimates-
19863 I-30, Suite 5
Benton, Arkansas
315-7728
Register online at http://
register.bentonbaseball.com
In-person registration
will be held at the Bernard
Holland Park conscession
stand at the following dates
and times:
Jan. 24 - 5:30 pm to 8
Jan. 25 - 10 am to 2
Jan. 31 - 5:30 pm to 8 p.m.
Feb. 1 - 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Feb. 7 - 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Feb. 8 - 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Registration forms will
be available to download at
http://www.bentonbaseball.
com
NOTE: Prices go up $10
per child after Feb. 8, so be
sure to register online or
in person on or before that
date. Prices after Feb. 8 go
up $10, except for three or
more players, which is still
free.
2014 Prices:
On or before Feb. 8:
Cal Ripken Babe Ruth
1st player 1st
$65 $75
2nd 2nd
$55 $65
3rd 3rd
free free
* all players qualifying for
multi-player discounts must
primarily live at the same
residence under the care of
the same parent or guardian.
BENTON BASEBALL
SIGNUPS
Registration times:
Jan. 25: 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. at
Haskell Community Center
Jan. 27: 5 p.m. - 8 p.m. at
Harmony Grove new gym
Feb. 1 : 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. at
Harmony Grove new gym
Feb. 4 : 5 p.m. - 8 p.m. at
Haskell Community Center
Registration fees will
be $50 per child, $85 for
two children and $100 for
three or more children.
Ages/Divisions for little
league baseball include 4-6
(instructional), 7-8 (pitching
machine), 9-10, 50/70 Senior
League.
Ages/Divisions for ASA
Softball include 4-5 (instruc-
tional), 6U, 8U (pitching
machine), 10U (pitching
machine or live arm), 12U
(slow or fast pitch) and
14/16 (slow or fast pitch).
Parents/guardians must
bring birth certificate and
three documents proving
residency. For more info,
contact Brian Johnson at 249-
0530 or Jennifer Hill at 840-
4197, or visit our website and
check us out on Facebook.
HASKELL LITTLE
LEAGUE
have to trust one another.”
Sharing the ball and
trusting each other offen-
sively and defensively
carried the Razorbacks by
Kentucky, Anderson said.
Now they must take it
on the road, something the
Hogs have not done in their
1-7 and 1-8 SEC road woes
the past two years winning
only at Auburn.
“Offensively we have to
have the ball movement
and share the basketball,”
Anderson said, “and on
defense we have to have
the mindset of getting stops
against a Georgia team that
has played a lot of close
games. It’s a tremendous
opportunity for us.”
And not an easy one, not
that any game outside the
Arkansas line is ever easy
for these Razorbacks.
Coach Mark Fox’s
Bulldogs got drubbed 72-50
last Saturday at seventh-
ranked reigning SEC
champion Florida, but the
previous two SEC games
won 70-64 in overtime at
Missouri and beat Alabama
66-58 in Athens. They
pose a contrast in styles to
Arkansas.
“Georgia is a team that
wants it to be in the 60s,”
Anderson said. “So it’s
going to be a game of
will and tempo. We want
it to be up-tempo. They
have two good guards
in (Charles) Mann and
(Kenny) Gaines. The
(Nemanja) Djurisic kid
(a 6-8 forward) is a really
good player. He played
well against us last year
and the previous year.”
Mann, Gaines and
Djurisic average 13.6, 11.7
and 10.1 points.
Marcus Thornton and
Donte Williams, 6-8 and 6-9
junior and senior forwards,
lead the Georgia starters
rebounding averaging 5.1
each.
The Bulldogs aren’t
nearly as talented as the
Florida and Kentucky
teams Arkansas took to
OT with split results, but
the Aggies, though now
3-0 in the SEC, don’t have
Kentucky and Florida tal-
ent yet and have beaten
Arkansas like a drum in
successive seasons at
College Station, Texas. In
fact, A&M had lost by 20 at
home to North Texas just
two games before ambush-
ing Arkansas.
“At A&M, and I thought
our guys probably went in
overconfident,” Anderson
said. “They’ve got to show
up and know we’re going
to have to scrap and claw
just like we play here. Just
play with great passion,
and play together. When
adversity takes place, trust
one another.”
A&M won the battle of
tempos against Arkansas
that Arkansas strives to
win at Athens.
“Our aim is going to
be to hopefully to try to
cause some chaos with
our defense,” Anderson
said. “Try to speed them
up. I always continue to
think our defense is best
in the half-court, but the
full-court is going to be to
disrupt what they want to
do. Because they want to
come out and they want
to pound you in there.
They get to the free-throw
line quite a bit.”
Arkansas got the
nationally acclaimed
game-winning follow dunk
with :00.4 in overtime by
Michael Qualls to beat
Kentucky and another
outstanding game by junior
guard Ky Madden, the
18-point co-scoring leader
with Qualls, but Anderson
said it was the bench that
tipped the Kentucky game
in Arkansas’ favor and
must be utilized if the the
Hogs are to march through
Georgia.
dangerous receiving unit
the 49ers envisioned
when Boldin came to San
Francisco last March in
a trade from Super Bowl
champion Baltimore that
sent a sixth-round draft pick
to the Ravens.
Boldin noticed a differ-
ence in how Seattle’s defense
played the Niners in Week 2
without Crabtree to the way
they did in a 19-17 49ers win
Dec. 8 at Candlestick Park
with him.
“Every team plays you
differently as opposed to
not having Crab out there,”
Boldin said. “He’s definitely
a weapon that you have to
account for.”
Boldin realizes, with
Crabtree playing a big part,
how fortunate he is to be
chasing a second champi-
onship in as many years
after winning it all with the
Ravens against the 49ers last
February.
“I’m in a situation where
I’m able to possibly compete
for a championship again.
As a player, that’s something
that you cherish, that’s
something that you play for,”
Boldin said. “So, I’ve been
blessed to be in this posi-
tion.”
Crabtree had eight recep-
tions for 125 yards in a 23-20
wild-card win at Green Bay.
Making his season debut on
Dec. 1 against St. Louis, he
played the final five games of
the regular season and had
19 receptions for 284 yards
and a touchdown.
“Playing was on my mind,
all I wanted to do is get back
Receivers
From page 5
Razorbacks
From page 5
Four days after that, he
was released from the hospi-
tal and his wife helped him
set up a command center
at his home in Charlotte to
keep tabs on his team back in
Denver.
Not only was he in daily
contact with defensive coordi-
nator Jack Del Rio, who guid-
ed the Broncos to three wins
in four games during in his
absence, but Fox was also in
constant communication with
his captains, including quar-
terback Peyton Manning.
Fox watched cut-ups of
practices on his iPad play-
book to help formulate game
plans and he watched games
on his big-screen TV.
The lone loss during his
hiatus was a 34-31 overtime
heartbreaker at New England
on Nov. 24 when the Broncos
blew a 24-0 halftime lead
after cornerback Dominique
Rodgers-Cromartie separated
a shoulder trying to pick off
Tom Brady’s desperation
pass that died in the wind at
the end of the first half.
Brady took advantage of
D.R.C.’s absence to stage
the biggest comeback of his
career, just as he’s going to
try to capitalize on the loss
of cornerback Chris Harris
Jr. (knee) when the Patriots
(13-4) visit the Broncos (14-3)
on Sunday with a trip to the
Super Bowl on the line.
“Probably the hardest
thing for the team was that
we didn’t know when Foxie
was going to be back,”
Broncos executive vice presi-
dent John Elway said. “And in
Foxie’s mind, he would have
been back three days after
the surgery.”
Fox and his wife, Robin,
flew home on team owner
Pat Bowlen’s jet in late
November and at Del Rio’s
suggestion he visited with
the team on Thanksgiving
morning, then watched from
his home in Denver as the
Broncos beat the Chiefs
35-28 in Kansas City that
weekend to take charge of
the AFC West.
He returned to work the
following day, his newfound
energy matching his renewed
enthusiasm, saying his sur-
geon told him the aortic valve
was now the size of a 50-cent
piece instead of a pinhead.
What a difference.
He exuded vitality while
capturing his third divi-
sion title in his three sea-
sons since replacing Josh
McDaniels in Denver, then
dispatched the demons of
last year’s playoff loss with an
exhaling win over San Diego
last weekend.
“He’s got more energy
than anybody I’ve ever seen,”
Elway said. “That, to me, is
the definition of John Fox:
the energy level that he
brings. He brings it to the
practice field, and it’s conta-
gious. I think that’s why he
was a perfect fit for us after
what happened with Josh.
That positive attitude that
he brings turned the culture
around because of the type of
guy that he is.
“We missed his energy.”
Since his return on Dec. 2,
Fox has more pep in his step,
more boom in his voice —
and even more gumption in
his calls.
Like sending in Matt
Prater for a 64-yard field goal
attempt on an icy afternoon
in Denver or ordering his
high-powered offense not to
milk the clock with a big lead
at Houston, where Manning
broke Brady’s single-season
touchdown record with a late
score.
Could this be the same
man who had Manning take
a knee with three timeouts
and 31 seconds remaining in
regulation in the playoff game
last year after Baltimore’s
Jacoby Jones’ 70-yard game-
tying TD catch?
Has Fox turned in his con-
servative credentials?
While Fox said his health
scare did cause him to re-
evaluate some things, he
insists it didn’t have a pro-
found effect on his approach
to the job.
“It’s like an injury to a
player,” Fox said. “When you
come back, you hope you’re
the same player again.”
Fox
From page 5
Harding Academy for baseball
and softball, and Rose Bud
and Rivercrest for basketball,”
Mooney said.
The bids do not cost
Harmony Grove actual cash.
According to Mooney, the
school bid to give 100 percent
of the basketball gate money
to AAA while keeping all of
the concession stand revenue.
Harmony Grove will also get a
percentage of the T-shirt sales,
cash from the tournament
and 100 percent of the money
brought in from program sales.
Harmony Grove will get a
little bit more overall money
from baseball and softball
since it agreed to give up just
75 percent of the gate cash
and keep all of the concessions
sales.
The Lady Cardinals’ softball
team will be looking to defend
its 3A State Championship this
season while basketball and
baseball look for a state tourna-
ment bid.
The Region 2 basketball
tournament is set for Feb. 26 -
March 1.
Region 2 baseball and soft-
ball tournaments are set for
May 9 - 12.
BHG
From page 5
JAY MANNING/jaysphotodesign.com
Harmony Grove softball Head Coach Sammi Massey gives high fives to her team during the 2013 3A State Finals in Fayetteville. Massey
won her fourth state title as a coach at Harmony Grove, third as head coach last season, defeating Lavaca. Harmony Grove will host the
Regional 2 tournament in basketball, baseball and softball this year.
Saturday, January 18, 2014
The Saline Courier 7
BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY
Air Conditioning
ELLIS
HEAT & AIR
Residential &
Commercial
Licsened, Bonded
& Insured
501-315-3999
HEATING AND
AIR CONDITIONING
Installation,
Maintenance and
24 Hour Service
501-425-3796
Residential &
Commerical
Attorneys
Beverly I. Brister
Attorney at Law
Bankruptcy
Chapter 7 & 13
501-778-2100
212 W. Sevier St.
Benton, Arkansas
Tax Attorney
IRS &
State Taxes
FREE Initial Consultation
David Heasley
attorney at law
Divorce &
Family Law
Free phone consultation
Payment Plan
681-4452
622 Alcoa Road,
in Benton
Backhoe & Dozer
315-2343
Peas
Gravel
Fill
SB-2
Topsoil
Sandy Loam
Sands
Donnafill
Pick-Up
or
Delivery
Carpentry
EXPERIENCED
CARPENTER
- Out of Work -
Home Maintenance
& Remodeling
of All Kinds
Vinyl Siding Installation
Call TIM
778-5171
Let the
Courier Classifieds
work for you.
Call Cathy or Kim
to place your
Classified Ad.
Mon.-Fri. 8am-5pm
315-8228
or come by
321 N. Market St.
Carpentry
OVER 30 YEARS
EXPERIENCE
- Free Estimates -
No job too LARGE
or small
Satisfaction Guaranteed!
DAVID BURTON, SR.
794-2563
Computer Services
A-1 COMPUTER
REPAIR
A+
Certified
Repair
Technician
•Desktop /Laptop
Repairs & Cleanup
•Virus-Spyware Removal-
Starting at $80.
1200 Ferguson Dr.
Ste. 5 • Benton
501-776-7577
Drywall Repair
DRYWALL
REPAIR
SERVICE
• Cracks & Holes
• Discolored Ceilings
• Water Stains
• Small Remodels
Valid References
40 Yrs. Experience
Steve Burrow - Owner
337–4525
Need to publish a
Legal Notice in
Saline County? We
can help...published
7 days a week...
501-315-8228
Handgun Classes
Ark rr ansas
Concealed
Permit Class
George Brooks, Instructor
License No. 12-763
501.413.2393
email:
georgebrookstheshooter@gmail.com
website:
www.georgebrookstheshooter.com
3470 Quapaw Rd., Benton
Advanced Shooting instruction available
rr
George Brooks Instructo
CONCEALED
HANDGUN
CLASSES
Course completed
in one day.
All
paperwork
provided.
Tim Bragg, Instructor
#95-055
501-776-7419
Horses
Clinic’s Certified
HOLTZMAN
Riding Academy, LLC
BIRTHDAY PARTIES
10 & UNDER
FREE COLT STARTING CLINIC
316-1141
SEEK AND YOU
SHALL FIND
Great deals in the
Courier Classifieds.
Yard Sales, Jobs,
Homes for Sale or
Rent. Check them out
daily. Call to sub-
scribe at 315-8228.
Landscaping
L.W. Lawn &
Landscaping
Services, LLC
www.lwlawnandlandscaping.com
lwlawnandlandscaping@yahoo.com
501-350-9137
870-942-9641
fax 501-847-6683
Lawn Maintenance, Trimming,
Sprinkler Installation, French
Drains, Shrub & Tree Pruning,
Leaf Removal, Landscaping,
Gutter Maintenance and more
But my God shall supply all your
needs according to his riches in
glory by Christ Jesus.
Phil. 4:19
Painting
SUPERIOR
PAINTING
3al|slacl|or 0uararleed
· 0ryWa|| F|r|s|
& Repa|r
· lrler|or & Exler|or
· Texlure
· Pressure was||rç
FREE E8T|HATE8
|N8URE0
Ke||y h||| - 0wner
501.840.1470
501.316.3328
Roofing
ROOFING
Wagner
Residential
Commercial
&
VOTED
“Best of the Best”
2009
Free Estimates
847-6630
Roofing
K & L
ROOFING
• Don’t Wait For
Roofing Repair
• All Insurance
Claims Welcome
• 40 years exp.
• Financing Avail.
w/approved credit
Upgrade to a metal roof with
a class 4 fire rating & you
may qualify for a discount on
your homeowners insurance
501-249-7735
501-318-8731
210 W. SEVIER
ST. • BENTON
Tree Service
M00ߣ
ñFF0ßßñ8l£
Tߣ£ 5£ß¥l8£
501-778-8071
501-860-5911
28-Years
Experience
Insured &
Licensed
*Stump Grinding
*Take Downs
*Trimming
*Pruning
*Storm Cleanup
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Tree Service
Parsons & Son
Tree Service LLC
“The Total Package”
Call us about
Tree Health Care
º 1rinning
º 1ake Lowns
º Pruning
º Renovals
º Stunp Renoval
º lirewood
º Oreen vaste lauling
Conplete
lnsuranoe Coverage
Owned 8 Operated
by an
lSA Lioensed Arborist
SO·L"PGA
840-1436
602-2959
CRITES
& TACKETT
TREE SERVICE
~ Free Estimates ~
Workman's Comp
& Liability Insured
•Stump Removal
501-337–1565
501-337-9094
Looking for love in all
the wrong places????
Check out the Freebie
section in todays
classifieds. You will
fi nd uncondi ti onal
love there FREE!
Furry & Free!!
Time to get your own
place? Check out the
Rental Section in to-
days Classifieds...
Tree Service Tree Service
501.317.6788
ROCKIN B
TREE SERVICE
B
TRIMMING
PRUNING
STUMP GRINDING
REMOVALS
large & small
FREE ESTIMATES
Insured for
Your Protection
Excellent Clean up
Senior and
Military Discounts
available
Looking for love in all
the wrong places????
Check out the Freebie
section in todays
classifieds. You will
fi nd uncondi ti onal
love there FREE!
Furry & Free!!
See Saline M A G A Z I N E
S P R I N G 2 0 1 2 I S S U E
THERE ARE MANY DIFFERENT SPOTS
IN SALINE COUNTY FOR ONE TO ENJOY
A NICE SWIM, A DAY OF FISHING OR
EVEN A COMPETITIVE CANOE RACE ON
THE SALINE RIVER
MORE INSIDE ON:
Where to golf in Saline
Where to vote
Local elected of cials
Museums, libraries and more
Fishing hole secrets
The Saline Courier along with the
entire media industry has experienced
numerous changes since its inception.
Over the years many predictions have
included the demise of print media. First
there was radio, then television and now
the Internet. Yet, through them all, The
Saline Courier remains an award winning
daily newspaper reporting the local news
Saline county residents seek. We are
proud to be a part of Saline County as its
oldest, continuously operated business.
oldest, cccontinuously operated business. o
321 N. Market St., Benton - 301-313-8228
3614 Marketplace Avenue, Suite 5 • Bryant
premieremedicalsupplyinc@yahoo.com
Office: 501-847-7800
Fax: 501-847-7804
• Power Wheel Chairs • Back and Knee Braces
• Diabetic Supplies • Hospital Beds
Serving all of Arkansas 24/7
Auto
*
Home
*
Life
*
Commercial
507 Oak Hill Road
P.O. Box 1530
Benton, AR 72018
Phone: 501.315.3118
Fax: 501.860.6187
sales@insladies.com
Dale Miller and Kellie Sturm
Agents
Janet Friday
Order#: 55-167015 DDS Dentures
55-167015 05 jf
$
39 $
395
per
set
Per Tooth
$100.
00
off
Any
Immediate
Denture Set!
1-DAY
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
STARTING AT JUST
$
395 pet Set
WITH WARRANTY
CROWNS
STARTING AT JUST
$
695
Per Unit
FREE
X-RAY
WITH THE PURCHASE
OF AN EXAM
$65 Value
Expires in 30 days
866-217-9901
23239 I-30 Bryant, AR www.denturesbryant.com
Invest in your quality of life
EXTRACTIONS
STARTING AT JUST
$
39 Per Tooth
With Denture Purchase
LITTLE ROCK — Crews
doing excavation work in
downtown Little Rock made
an unusual find this week: a
military sword possibly dat-
ing to the early 1800s.
Workers are excavating
for the construction of a
new parking deck at a site
that once housed the Ashley
mansion, built around 1820
by the prominent lawyer and
U.S. Sen. Chester Ashley.
Clark Construction rep-
resentatives turned over
the sword to the Historic
Arkansas Museum on
Tuesday. Museum chief
curator Swannee Bennett
said the curved sword is like-
ly of American or European
origin.
"They were kind enough
to bring it by and show it
to us," Bennett told the
Arkansas Democrat-Gazette,
adding that the soil-encrust-
ed sword must undergo deli-
cate testing to better deter-
mine its age. "We're a small
community, and everybody
sort of knows us.
"I was ecstatic to see it,"
he said. "It's remarkable that
it survived all this time."
The Ashley mansion was
originally built around 1820,
then enlarged to two stories
by 1840 with thick, brick col-
umns in front.
Union forces occupied the
Ashley house in the latter
stages of the Civil War after
taking control of Little Rock
in 1863, Bennett said.
"It's possible some
Confederate or Union army
personnel could have lost
the (sword), or it could have
belonged to Chester Ashley,"
Rare sword dug up by construction crew in Arkansas
Associated Press Bennett said.
"Ashley was a mover and
shaker and could have afford-
ed a sword.
Special to The Saline Courier
The soil-encrusted sword was
turned over to the Historic
Arkansas Museum.
WORSHIP
Page 8 – The Saline Courier
news@bentoncourier.com Saturday, January 18, 2014
Benton Women’s Clinic
Obstetrics and Gynecology
1220 Military Road | Benton, AR 72015 | 501-778-1000
John V. Baka,
M.D., P.A.
Wendy West, APN-WHNP, B.C
778.2838
2408 Military Rd
Benton AR
1515 Hwy 5 North • Benton
www.harpsfood.com
Serving Families Since 1882
Narroway & N. Main Street
Benton, Arkansas 72015
778-2544 • 847-3371
www.ashbyfuneralhome.com
Member of the Arkansas Association
of Funeral Directors
Funeral Home & Insurance
APOSTOLIC
Apostolic Christian Center
20121 I-30, Benton
501-315-2100
Pastor: Scott & Bobby McElroy
Apostolic Tabernacle Church
2314 Military Road, Benton
501-315-1855
Pastor: Rev. J. Emerson
ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Abundant Life Center
23790 I-30 N., Bryant
501-847-4357
Rev. Sam & Tami Crenshaw
Assembly of God
1020 East Grand, Haskell
Pastor: Jason Keisler
Benton First Assembly of God
1801 Hot Springs Hwy., Benton
501-778-7597
www.bentonfirst.com
Pastor: Rev. Gene Huskey
Calvary Assembly of God
3420 Military Rd., Benton
501-778-2884
Pastor: Randy Roach
www.calvarybenton.com
BAPTIST
Avilla Missionary Baptist Church
10582 Avilla Road West
501-316-1623
Pastor: Kirby Caple
Bethel Missionary Baptist
501 S. Border St., Benton
501-778-3396
Pastor: Bro. Carl Higgs
Berean Baptist Church
353 Jay St., Haskell
501-776-2571
Pastor: Larry Mattingly
Brooks Bethel Baptist Church
20020 S. Alexander Rd.,
501-557-5350
Pastor: Buddy Fowler
www.brooksbethelmbc.com
Calvary Baptist Church
612 Valley View Rd., Benton
501-778-4762
Pastor: Frank Thurman
www.cbcbenton.com
Celebration Baptist Church
4601 Hwy 229 in Haskell-Benton
Pastor: Allan Eakin
Congo Road Baptist Church
7193 Congo Road, Benton
501-794-3844
Pastor: Rev. Jeff Langley
www.congoroadbaptistchurch.org
Cross Bar C Cowboy Church
10895 Hwy. 70 - Exit 111
Pastor: Greg Spann
Cross Roads Missionary
Baptist Church
10019 Lily Dr., Benton
Pastor: Larry Campbell
Discover The Joy Baptist
410 S. East St., Benton
501-837-8058
Pastor: Perry Robinson
Eastside Baptist Church
Fifth & Hoover St., Benton
501-778-8443
Pastor: Steve Raines
Fairplay Missionary Baptist
8516 Fairplay Rd., Benton
Pastor: Kenny Mitchell
501-778-5755
First Baptist Church
211 S. Market St., Benton
778-2271/315-2270
Pastor: Rick Grant
www.fbcbenton.org
First Baptist Church (ABA)
401 N. Reynolds Rd., Bryant
501-847-0365 www.fbcbryant.net
Pastor: Phillip Miller
First Southern Baptist
604 S. Reynolds Rd., Bryant
501-847-3014
www.1stsouthern.org
Forest Hills Missionary Baptist
1119 Alcoa Rd., Benton
501-315-4403
Pastor: Marcus W. Blakley
Geyer Springs 1st Baptist Church
12400 Hwy I-30, Little Rock
501-455-3474 www.gsfbc.org
Pastor: Jeff Williams
Gospel Light Baptist
910 W. Hazel St., Benton
Grace Baptist Church
21941 I-30, Suite 10 Bryant
Pastor: Joel Prickett
501-249-0869
Gravel Hill Baptist Church
6259 Hwy 9
Benton, AR 72019
Pastor: Nathan Nalley
www.thechurchatgravelhill.com
Highland Heights Baptist
1421 Alcoa Rd., Benton
501-315-7204
Pastor: Bro. Brian Moore
Holland Chapel Baptist Church
15523 I-30, Benton
501-778-4546
Pastor: Jason Tallent
Hurricane Lake Baptist
2516 Springhill Rd., Bryant
501-847-2864
Pastor: Benny Grant
Indian Springs Baptist Church
23581 I-30, Bryant
501-847-2915
Pastor: Tom Williams
Kentucky Missionary Baptist
7070 Hwy. 5, Benton
Pastor: Rev. Donny Haynes
Landmark Missionary Baptist
215 E. Main St., Traskwood
Pastor: Rev. James Floyd
Lighthouse Baptist Church
4163 Salt Creek Rd.
Pastor: Morgan Flagler
Mars Hill Missionary
Baptist Church
128000 Mars Hill Road
Pastor: Rev. Davy McCool
Mountain View Missionary Baptist
1552 Mountain View Road,
Benton
Pastor: Phillip Batchelor,
501-909-9090
Mt. Olive Missionary Baptist
3700 Mount Olive Rd., Bauxite
Pastor: Doug Hammonds
Mt. Harmony Missionary Baptist
245 Mt. Harmony Dr.,
Haskell-Benton (off Hwy 229)
776-0821 Pastor: Robert Ashcraft
Mt. Vernon Baptist Church
5408 Alcoa Rd., Benton
Pastor, Scott King
Mulberry Missionary Baptist
5838 Salt Creek Rd., Benton
Pastor: Martin Lamb
New Friendship Missionary Baptist
7400 Friendship Rd., Benton
Interim Pastor Tyler Askew
501-317-0855
New Life Baptist Church
10765 Samples Rd., Alexander
501-316-1985 nlbcavilla.org
Pastor: Dr. Sid Sample
New Life Missionary Baptist
126 West Dr., Benton
Pastor: Rev. Scotty Nalley
New Prospect Missionary Baptist
Peeler Bend Rd.
Pastor: David Standridge
Oak Grove Missionary Baptist
2907 Congo Rd.
501-315-5279
Pastor: Vance Nutt
Old Union Baptist Church
12641 Hwy 298
501-794-2215
Pastor: Rev. Joseph Cornelison
Palestine Missionary Baptist
Hwy 35 S.
Pastor: Rev. J. Clyde Chenault
501-778-4177
Park Place Baptist Church
22208 I-30 N., Bryant
Pastor: Gary Lambright
Pleasant Hill Baptist Church
24310 N. Sardis Rd.
501-557-5153
Pastor: Rick Porter
Ridgecrest Baptist Church
900 Ridge Rd., Benton
501-778-6747 501-249-5049
Pastor: Bro. James Coward
Salem Baptist Church
3069 Salem Rd., Benton
501-316-5352
www.salem-baptist.com
Saline Missionary Baptist
8210 N. Main St., Tull
Pastor: Rev. Kim Hammer
Sharon Missionary Baptist
402 Shenandoah Dr., Benton
501-778-4103
Pastor: Richard Hamlin
Social Hill Missionary Baptist
2021 Hwy. 35 S., Benton
Pastor Bro. Bill Williams
Spring Creek Baptist
19200 I-30, Benton
Pastor: Dr. Terry Parrish
Springhill Missionary Baptist
8602 Springhill Rd. 501-316-1345
Pastor: Bro. Steven Sewell
Temple Baptist Church
8601 Hwy 67, Benton
778-1295
Temple Missionary Baptist
3215 Coats Rd., Benton
501-860-8907
Pastor: Rev. David Harris
Ten Mile Missionary Baptist
17510 Church Rd.
Lonsdale, AR 72087
(501) 939-2227
Bro. Wesley Howard
Trinity Baptist Church
702 Church St., Benton
501-778-9146
Pastor: Mike Titsworth
United Missionary Baptist Church
3810 Salem Rd. Benton Ar.72019
Pastor: Bro. Randy Ward
501-326-7396
Tyndall Park Missionary Baptist
Corner of Cox and Hoover St.
501-993-9029
Pastor: Cecil Hyde
Vimy Ridge Immanuel Baptist
12214 Germania Rd.,
501-847-2322
Pastor Timothy Vanya
Vimy Ridge Missionary Baptist
14823 Vimy Ridge Road
Alexander, 455-2947
Pastor: Bro. Dennis Mitchell
501-455-1065 • 501-778-7270
SINCE 1957
Evans Auto Parts
Dicky Evans
Paul Ramsey
Mike Adams
408 Watson Lane
Benton, AR 72015
501-778-6544
BENTON AUTOMOTIVE
Factory Trained MasterTechnicians
1123 Highway 5 North • Benton
501-776-2292
Family Owned – Family Friendly
Jesus Loves You
307 Office Park Dr. in Bryant
501.847.3200
www.bryanthamptoninn.com
4500 Hwy 5 N. , Suite 6 • Bryant
www.mfbanknet.com
Stoneybrook Health
and Rehabilitation
- Skilled Care
- Traditional Care
- Hospice
- Respite Care
- Alzheimer’s Care
- Rehabilitation Services
- Physical Therapy
- Occupational Therapy
- Speech Therapy
3300 Military Rd.,
Benton AR 72015
501-778-8282
Our philosophy is simple...
Focus on quality and results will follow.
This Directory is made possible by these businesses who encourage all of us to attend worship services.
The Church Listings are provided at no charge to our area churches in Saline county.
If your Church is not listed, please contact The Saline Courier at 315-8228 ext. 229 or email composing@bentoncourier.com
Featured Church...
New Summit Church of God
3916 Silica Heights Rd • Benton
Mon.-Fri. 8-5
501-315-0022
2500 Old Congo Rd.
Benton
Reputation for
Quality Work
AUTO • HOME • LIFE • BUSINESS Ron Jones, LUTCF
Ron Jones Agency
606 W. Commerce Dr., Suite 2
Bryant, AR 72022
Bus: 501-847-8155
Fax: 501-847-8492
rjones6@farmersagent.com
620 W. South St. • Benton • 778-3151 or 778-1166
MON. - SAT. 8am- 9pm & SUN. 12pm- 9pm
Western Union Services • Pay Phone Bills Here • Accept Insurance Plans & Part D Plans
Our Family....
Taking Care of your Family
Celebrating 6
0
Y
ears!
J
e
s
u
s
Loves
Y
o
u
Parsons Tire & Service
501.315.5200 • 813 Military Road • Benton, Arkansas
This joke may be the
most famous in all of Baptist
humor.
While crossing a high
bridge, a traveler encoun-
ters a distressed man who
is poised to jump. The first
man asks the second if he
is religious and a Christian.
The suicidal man answers
"yes" to both. Catholic or
Protestant? The jumper
says, "Protestant." And, as
it turns out, both men are
Baptists.
"Are
you Baptist
Church
of God or
Baptist
Church of
the Lord?"
The second
man, in a
classic ver-
sion of this
joke found
at the Ship
of Fools
website, replies: "Baptist
Church of God."
"Me too. Are you original
Baptist Church of God, or
are you Reformed Baptist
Church of God?" Second
man: "Reformed Baptist
Church of God."
"Me too. Are you
Reformed Baptist Church
of God, Reformation of
1879, or Reformed Baptist
Church of God, Reformation
of 1915?" Second man:
"Reformed Baptist Church
of God, Reformation of
1915."
So the first Baptist push-
es the second to his death,
shouting: "Die, heretic
scum!"
The amazing thing is that
they didn't even get to fight
about biblical inerrancy, the
first chapter of Genesis or
the precise details of the
Second Coming of Christ.
For centuries, Baptists
have had their share of
arguments about doctrine
and church life, and they
cherish their approach to
the "priesthood of all believ-
ers" and the authority of
every local congregation.
As the old saying goes,
put two Baptists on an
island and you will soon
have the First Baptist
Church of the Deserted
Island and the Second
Baptist Church of the
Deserted Island.
Thus, it's interesting
that some educators, on
the Baptist left and right,
now believe that it's time
for modern Baptists to use
an ancient tool -- the cat-
echism -- in their struggles
against rising levels of bibli-
cal and doctrinal illiteracy.
Catechisms are short docu-
ments written in a simple,
question-and-answer format
to help children and new
believers learn the basics of
the faith.
"This used to be Sunday
school for Baptists and the
Baptists are beginning to rethink the catechisms
Associated Press
TERRY
MATTINGLY
ON
RELIGION
WORSHIP
Bring
your
Church
Bulletin
for
15% off
Catering
15 to
500
Catfish
and
Homecooking
4444 Hwy.5 • Benton
501-794-0329 • fax 501-794-2974
www.riversidegrocery.com
riversidegrocery@att.net Like us on
Good
Home
Cooking
Ed & Kay’s
Restaurant
Exit 116 • 15228 I-30
315-FOOD
Good Home Cooking
17036 Interstate 30 Frontage Rd
Benton, AR 72019 • (501) 778-9695
Baxley-Delamar
Monuments, Inc.
19133 Interstate 30 • Benton, AR 72015
315-7261 778-7261
Same ownership, management and
superior quality since 1957
A Retirement Residence
Bryant, Arkansas
501.847.3400
fax 501.653.0113
www.foxridgeliving.net
“Don’t Let
Retirement
Become A Chore”
Open House
Every Saturday
& Sunday
2-4pm
Saturday, January 18, 2014
news@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page 9
Victory Baptist Church
5386 Hwy 67 S., Benton
501-315-5005
Pastor: Ken Graham
West Bauxite Miss. Baptist
5701 Hwy 183, Bauxite
501-557-5691
Pastor: Rev. Melvin Burris
Wright’s Chapel Baptist
2150 S. Market St., Benton
CATHOLIC
Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church
900 W. Cross St., Benton
Rev. Chinnaiah Irudayaraj
Yeddanapalli (Fr. YC)
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Northside Church of Christ
917 N. East St., Benton
501-315-1128
Pastor: Jim Gardner
New Bethel Church of Christ
3777 Kruse Loop, Alexander
501-794-1994
Central Arkansas Church of Christ
8220 Hwy 5 Alexander
Minister: Reggie Nalls
Church of Christ
305 East Smith St., Benton
501-317-5113 or 317-6900
Church of Christ
4232 Edison Ave., Bauxite
501-794-1604
Haskell Church of Christ
Haskell
501-315-0173
Hwy 5 Church of Christ
1500 Hwy 5 N.
Benton, AR 72019
501-303-0465
Evangelist James Hamilton
Highway Church of Christ
18514 I-30, Benton
501-315-3303
Pastor: Steven Ford
Johnson Street Church of Christ
101 W. Johnson St., Benton
501-315-9034 or 501-315-7896
Paron Church Of Christ
17212 Hwy 9, Paron
501-594-8373
River Street Church of Christ
415 River St., Benton
501-778-4042
Pastor: Bro. Dennis Gage
Salem Road Church of Christ
2700 Salem Rd.
501-316-1415
CHURCH OF GOD
Benton Pentecostal CoG
4023 Gattin Rd., Benton
501-778-8664
Pastors: Elizabeth & Dave Witt
Bryant Pentecostal Church of God
5094 Highway 5 North
Bryant, AR 72022
501-847-8140
Pastors: Henry Hunt & Ruth Hunt
Grape Chapel Church of God
7100 Hwy 298 (Kirk Rd.)
501-794-0206
Pastor: Scott L. Planck
www.gccog4u.com
New Life Church of God
Chambers Rd., Bauxite
501-249-3330 Pastor: Roy Willis
New Song Community Church of God
1458 Salem Road, Benton, AR 72018
New Summit Church of God
3916 Silica Heights Rd., Benton
Pastor: Bryan Hughes
Walnut Street Church of God
520 W. Walnut
Benton, AR 72016
EPISCOPAL
St. Matthew’s Episcopal
1112 Alcoa Rd., Benton
501-315-1516
Priest Lorrie Slaymaker
www.stmatthewsar.org
LUTHERAN
First Lutheran Church
18181 I-30 S., Benton
Pastor: James D. Burns
Friends in Christ Lutheran Church
4305 Hwy 5 N., Bryant
501-213-6521
Pastor: Emil Woerner
www.bryantlutheran.com
Zion Lutheran Church
300 Avilla Road East
501-408-4630
Pastor: Michael Schleider
www.zionlutheranavilla.org
METHODIST
Benton First United Methodist
200 N. Market St., Benton
501-778-3601
Sr. Minister Rev. David Jones
www.fumcbenton.org
Bryant First United Methodist
508 N. Reynolds Rd., Bryant
501-847-0226
Pastor: Rev. Hamett Evans
www.fumcbryant.org
Congo United Methodist
2903 Steel Bridge Road
Pastor: Polly Burton
Ebenezer United Methodist
Church
8319 N. Main Tull
501-778-6242
Pastor Rev. Randy Reed
Mt. Carmel United Methodist
2005 Hwy 5, Benton
501-794-2451
Pastor: Rev. Bob Warlord
New Hope United Methodist
1705 New Hope Road, Benton
501-860-2302
Rev.Walt Garrett
Parkview United Methodist
514 Border St., Benton
501-778-2145
Pastor: Rev. Walt Garrett
www.pumcbenton.org
Salem United Methodist
1647 Salem Rd., Benton
501-316-2282
Pastor: Rev. Carlton Cross
Rev. Randy Ward
Sardis United Methodist
10715 W. Sardis Rd., Bauxite
501-602-2129
Pastor: Rev. Stephen Dickinson
www.thesardischurch.net
Traskwood United Methodist
Hwy. 229 and Main Street.
Pastor: Danny Dunlap
www.traskwoodumc.org
NAZARENE
Cornerstone
Church of the Nazarene
25799 I-30, County Line Exit #126
501-653-2886
Pastor: Rev. Tim Evans
First Church of the Nazarene
1203 W. Sevier St., Benton
501-315-9600
Pastor: Rev. Brady Lane
PENTECOSTAL
First Pentecostal Church
16412 I-30, Benton 501-778-6974
Pastors: Rev. Burl Crabtree
and Bishop O.D. Crabtree
First Pentecostal Church
4212 Hwy 5 N., Bryant
Pastor: Rev. Jerry Whitley
Lawson Rd. Pentecostal Church
807 E. Lawson 501-821-3542
PRESBYTERIAN
Cumberland Presbyterian
Fellowship
3600 Market Place, Bryant
315-0355/888-4190
Pastor: Rev. Buster Guthrie
First Presbyterian Church
501 N. East St., Benton
501-315-7737
www.fpcbenton.com
Pastor: Rev. Dr. Dari Rowen
7th-DAY ADVENTIST
Seventh-Day Adventist
2615 Lincoln Rd., Benton
501-778-0641
Pastor: Michael Wolford
DISCIPLES OF CHRIST
First Christian Church
16218 I-30 at Pinewood Dr.,
Benton
Pastor: Rev. Joe Jorgensen
OTHER CHURCHES
Benton Foursquare Church
Military & Thomas Roads, Benton
501-315-2229
Pastor: Rev. David Brewer
Centerpoint Church
20383 I-30, in Benton
501-776-2570
Pastor: Rev. Pat Dezort
Christ Church
11800 Vimy Ridge Road
455-6275/455-1506
Pastor: G.A. & Joyce Dudley
Faith Fellowship
608 S. Marion, Benton
501-794-1683
Family Church
21815 I-30, Bryant
501-847-1559
Pastor: Rev. Perry Black
Fellowship Bible Church
5724 Alcoa Rd., Benton
501-315-1560
www.fbclr.org
First ChristianChurch
16218 interstate 30
501-778-8237
Pastor Joe Jorgensen
Gateway Church
1201 W. Longhills Road
501-680-9043
www.salinegateway.org
Grace Church
5205 W. Sawmill Rd.
501-804-0371
Pastor: Tommy Jones
www.thegracechurch.net
The Lighthouse Church
2800 Military Rd., Benton
Pastor: Barbara Allred
Midtowne Church
4037 Boone Rd, Benton
501-315-0992
Pastor: Doug Pruitt
Pleasant Hill AME Church
302 Reed St., Benton
Pastor: Rev. Cleophus Collier
Victory Fellowship
407 Prickett Rd., Bryant
501-847-1855
www.victoryfellowshiplr.com
World Bibleway Fellowship
1214 Liberty St., Benton
Pastor: Rev. Hank Smith
Limited space does remain foryour business to become a participant in making this informative directory
possible. Email wally@burchettmedia.com to acquire more details.
If your Church is not listed, please contact The Saline Courier at 315-8228 ext. 229 or email composing@bentoncourier.com
1703 Military Rd
in Benton
778-5111
HAPPY HOUR
1/2 PRICE DRINKS & SLUSHES
2-4PM
Open
Mon-Sat 6 am
Sunday 8 am
3505 Boone Road
Benton, AR
501-315-1555
540 Ponce de Leon
Hot Springs Village
501-922-0166
www.mtcarmelcommunity.com
Assisted and Independent Living Options
Southwest
ICE
1480 Salem Rd. • Benton, AR 72019 • 501-776-0652
16428 Interstate 30 • Benton, AR 72015
17309 I-30 • BENTON
501.860.6135
INC.
EMBROIDERY & MONOGRAMMING
TARA & SHELBY FAGAN 11657 Interstate 30
(501) 315-6497 Benton, AR 72015
INC.
EMBROIDERY & MONOGRAMMING
TARA & SHELBY FAGAN 11657 Interstate 30
(501) 315-6497 Benton, AR 72015
315-3196
1016 W. South, Ste. 6
South Center Plaza
Benton
Mon.-Fri. 11-8 • Sat 11-3
“For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that
whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.” John 3:16
1700 Hot Springs Highway
Benton, AR 72019-0000
● ●
@RestoreSalineCo
● ●
@RestoreSalineCo
● ●
@RestoreSalineCo
● ●
@RestoreSalineCo
● ●
@RestoreSalineCo
● ●
@RestoreSalineCo
● ●
@RestoreSalineCo
● ●
@RestoreSalineCo
● ●
@RestoreSalineCo
● ●
@RestoreSalineCo
Featured Church...
Highland Heights Baptist Church
1421 Alcoa Rd • Benton
way that they taught and
handed down doctrines
from generation to genera-
tion," said Thomas Nettles,
who teaches historical the-
ology at Southern Baptist
Theological Seminary in
Louisville, Ky. Catechisms
"showed you what you
believed, in common with
other Christians, but they
also told you what you
believed, as a Baptist, that
was different from other
Christians."
For many Baptists
today, proposing a Baptist
catechism may sound as
strange as talking about
a Baptist creed or even
a Baptist pope. The key,
explained Nettles, is that
while Catholics, Anglicans,
Lutherans and others can
rally around a common cat-
echism that expresses their
tradition's authoritative
stance on doctrine, Baptists
through history have freely
chosen different catechisms
at the local, congregational
level.
For example, while early
versions of the Sunday
School Board -- back in
1863 and 1891 -- published
catechisms for Southern
Baptists, some churches
used them while others
did not. The final doctrinal
authority remained in local
pews and pulpits. Some
congregational leaders even
wrote their own catechisms.
Tradition says there can
be one Catholic catechism.
By definition, Baptists have
always needed multiple cat-
echisms.
"Still, the reality was that
there was more of a sense
of shared faith and practice
back then, compared with
Baptist life today, which has
been shaped by decades
of conflict and arguments,"
said Nettles. "We can't go
back to where we were.
... Right now, I don't think
Baptists could even agree
on what it would mean for
us to try to hold doctrines
in common. Too many
things have happened to
push us apart."
Ironically, he said,
some of the modern forces
behind the creation of many
Baptist niche groups -- the
Internet, parachurch minis-
try conferences and mega-
churches with superstar
pastors -- are now inspir-
ing people to rally around
documents that resemble
catechisms. For example,
some Baptists have begun
to rebel against a kind of
doctrinal "libertarianism"
that denies the need for
doctrinal specifics, period.
"You go online and
this is what you see," said
Nettles. "People are speak-
ing out and then other
people will rally around that
persuasive voice. Before
you know it, a network has
formed around a set of com-
mon beliefs and people start
sharing what they know
and what they believe.
"Then they start writing
things down. Pretty soon
they're sharing books and
educational materials. They
even end up with things
that look a lot like cat-
echisms."
Terry Mattingly is the
director of the Washington
Journalism Center at the
Council for Christian
Colleges and Universities
and leads the GetReligion.
org project to study religion
and the news.
CLASSIFIEDS
PLACE AN AD
FIND AN AD
Listings are divided by category.
To get your ad in the Courier,
call 501-315-8228 Monday
through Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.,
online at bentoncourier.com,
come by the offce at 321 N.
Market St. in Benton or mail
to: PO Box 207, Benton,AR
72018. We accept Visa,
MasterCard, Discover, and
American Express.
WHEN TO CALL
FOR ADS APPEARING | CALL BEFORE
Tuesday –––––––––––– Mon Noon
Wednesday –––––––––– Tues. Noon
Thursday ––––––––––– Weds. Noon
Friday –––––––––––––– Thurs. Noon
Saturday –––––––––––– Thurs. Noon
Sunday ––––––––––––– Fri. Noon
Monday –––––––––––– Fri. Noon
GET ONLINE
WHAT
IT
COSTS
YARD
SALES
4 lines – 3 days – $18.68*
4 lines – 7 days – $29.28*
4 lines – 14 days – $ 45.44*
Extra lines available
4 lines – 2 days – $15.64*
4 lines – 3 days – $18.48*
Extra lines available
Cost includes ad and yard
sale packet including signs.
You can place your ad
on our website....
bentoncourier.com
Just go to website and
follow the steps.
Email us at:
class@bentoncourier.
com
}
}
}
}
}
*Price doesn’t include charge for graphic, TMC
rate, or internet. Price is subject to change.
Page 10 – The Saline Courier
class@bentoncourier.com Saturday, January 18, 2014
See
SALINE
M A G A Z I N E
Places to GO, things to DO, sights
to SEE and available services
Readers will find practical information on what to do, where
to go, dining, shopping, entertainment, activities, area history,
maps and much more!
Don’t miss your chance to take part in this award winning
publication! See Saline was voted #1 magazine by the
Arkansas Press Association.
CALL YOUR SALINE COURIER REPRESENTATIVE TODAY! 501-315-8228
DEADLINE: February 11, 2014
PUBLISHES: February 27, 2014
SERVICE DIRECTORY
2x2 Full Color Ad
$
125
Ads will be
categorized by service
WORSHIP GUIDE
2x2 page Full Color Ad
$
125
Call Cathy or Kim
at 315-8228
Delivered to Saline
Courier subscribers and
available at locations
throughout Saline County.
SALINE COUNTY’S NEWS SOURCE SINCE 1876
COURIER
THE SALINE
8 Courier Thursday, February 4, 2010
CMYK
Super Savings for
the Super Game
Check out the savings for your
Arm Chair Quarterback party!
~ full menu featuring ~
Steaks • Seafood • Appetizers • Sandwiches
Burgers • Soups • Salads
all with some Cajun flair!
Open 7 Days a Week
11am - Midnight
17332 I-30 N. • Benton • 501-778-9444
(Located in front of Tinseltown)
www.touchdownsallys.com
10
Flat Screen TV’s
to watch
all of the games!
Video Arcade

6 Flat Screen TV’s
for Remote Trivia
“Saline Countys Newest Restaurant”
Kickoff Weekend
Sept. 10th -14th
• Food
• Family
• Football
• Fun
ATTENTION MEMBERS & GUESTS
Super Bowl Savings!
A great value for a
super weekend!
For $70 - your ad can
appear on the Super
Bowl Savings page in
the Saline Courier on
Super Thursday,
January30th, and
Sunday, February 2
the day of the game
for one low price!
$
70
Take advantage of this super special.
Space is limited. Deadline is Jan 28.
Call Cathy TODAY 315-8228.
321 N. Market St. • Benton • 315-8228
www.bentoncourier.com
Thursday, January 30, 2014
Family Owned and Customer Friendly
501.315.7100 • Interstate 30 at Alcoa Exit
21099 I-30 Bryant, AR 72202 • www.everettbpg.com
Bullock’s
Superstop
15536 Interstate 30
Exit 116
Benton, AR 315-3898
Continuous Service for 32 Years
501-315-8333
824 Military Rd.
Benton
Garage Sales
ANOTHER
MAN'S TREASURE
Wed-Sat/ 10am-6pm
Sunday/ 1pm-6pm
Across from
Old Reynolds Plant
Bauxite
501-557-5565
I BUY Junk Cars
Call Jerry Toland
332-7202 • 840-6756
MULTI FAMILY
indoor sale 123 East
South St. Sat 18th &
Sun 19th, 7a-?
Lost & Found
FOUND A Set of
Keys near Tyndall
Park please call to
describe. 672.8182
FOUND SMALL Bea-
gle Dog (Wellington
Point) Letter S on hip
Call 501-412-8179
Wanted
WANT TO buy a
portable basketball
goal Call 778-4785
Employment
ACCEPTING APPLI-
CATIONS for the fol-
lowing: Certified Ac-
tivity Director, previ-
ous experience re-
quired, Mon - Fri.
Dining Room Host-
ess, must be CNA,
Monday-Friday.
CNA's, day & eve-
ning shift. Apply in
person only, Malvern
Nursing & Rehab,
829 Cloud Rd,
Malvern, AR.
C N A’s
3-11 & Week-
end option
Apply in Person at:
Alcoa Pines
Health & Rehab
3300 Alcoa Road
EOE Employer
Classifieds Work!
Employment
DENTAL ASST NEEDED
Please call
Dr. Fusilier’s office @
922-6700 or fax resume
to 501-922-6357
EVENING Janitorial
Position. No Exp
Needed, Ref. Req.,
Must be able to pass
Drug Test & Back-
ground Check. Call
Mon-Fri, 8a-5p
501-617-4567
EXPERIENCED COOK
/ WAITSTAFF
CALL HOME PLATE
DINER ASK FOR
RICK 813-4423
PART-TIME MECHANIC III
needed for Central Arkan-
sas Development Coun-
cil’s Malvern SCAT office.
Supervisory and computer
experience a plus. Must
have basic mechanic
knowledge, be dedicated,
flexible and a self-starter
with excellent communica-
tions skills. This position
pays $11.51 per hour and
requires a minimum of a
Class B CDL with Passen-
ger endorsement with the
first (90) days of employ-
ment. Pre-employment
Drug Screening and
Criminal Background
Check required. To down-
load an Employment
Application go to
www.cadc.com. Employ-
ment Applications are
retained on file for (1) one
year. You must contact
HR if application was
previously submitted you
want to be considered for
the above position or for
more information call
501-315-1121.
Equal Opportunity Employer
Let the
Courier Classifieds
work for you.
Call Cathy or Kim
to place your
Classified Ad.
Mon.-Fri. 8am-5pm
315-8228
or come by
321 N. Market St.
Looking for a good
deal? Search the
Courier Classifieds!!
Employment
Animal Services
Manager
The City of Benton is
currently taking appli-
cations for Manager
of the Animal Control
Department. Job
function is to plan, co-
ordinate and manage
animal control serv-
ices and operations of
the City. Employee
must possess a valid
Arkansas driver's li-
cense. Interested
persons may obtain
an application and a
complete job descrip-
tion at City Hall, 114
S. East Street, Ben-
ton, AR, Monday
through Friday,
between the hours of
8:00 A.M. and 5:00
P.M. or by visiting
the City of Benton
website at
www.bentonar.org
Consideration will
begin after 5:00 P.M.,
Wednesday, January
22, 2014. EQUAL OP-
PORTUNITY EMPLOYER
TEACHER II - BSE
needed for Central Arkan-
sas Development Coun-
cil’s Paron Head Start
Center. Bachelor’s De-
gree w/emphasis in Early
Childhood required with ar
least five years experi-
ence woking with
pre-school children pre-
ferred. Pre-employment
Drug Screening and
Criminal Background
Check required. To down-
load an Employment
Application go to
www.cadc.com. Employ-
ment Applications are
retained on file for (1) one
year. You must contact
HR if application was
previously submitted you
want to be considered for
the above position or for
more information call
501-315-1121.
Equal Opportunity Employer
Need to publish a
Legal Notice in
Saline County? We
can help...published
7 days a week...
501-315-8228
Employment
WATER TREATMENT
OPERATOR II
Benton Utilities is tak-
ing applications. Job
function is to assist in
the operation and
maintenance of the
water plant facilities,
equipment, buildings,
and grounds. Appli-
cants should have a
basic knowledge of
regulations regarding
water quality, work-
pl ace safety and
ADEQ training; ability
to wear a respirator
and SCBA. Require-
ments are the ability
to obtain Arkansas
Water Treatment and
Distribution License.
Employment applica-
tion and complete job
description are avail-
able at Benton Mu-
nicipal Complex, 114
S. East Street, Ben-
ton, AR, Monday
through Friday, be-
tween the hours of
8:00 A.M. and 5:00
P.M. or from the City
of Benton website at
www.bentonar.org .
Consideration will be-
gin on January 24,
2014. Salary DOE.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY
EMPLOYER
Service/F & B Director
POSITION OPEN
Diamante is taking applications
for an experienced
Service/F&B Director
Must have management
experience and references relative
to your skill levels including Aloha
and/or other computer related
F&B management operations.
Security and DMV background
check will be required.
Please send your resume either
by USPS or as an attachment to:
Madison Pope, General Manager,
Diamante Country Club
2000 Country Club Drive,
Hot Springs Village, AR 71909 or
madison.pope@ourclub.com
Child Care
CHILDCARE
Infants to 5 B •L• S
Vouchers
562-0691 • 951-2923
6:30a -5:30p
Classifieds Work!
Child Care
IN-HOME DAYCARE
Spotless - Non-smoking
Drop-ins Welcome!
778-2920
Services
EXP. CAREGIVER
with exc. references.
Will cook, clean, run
errands. Call
501-860-1624
Apartments
Unfurnished
2 BR Apts, kit. appl.,
W&D conn., $500 &
up. Handicap access.
317-5190 / 317-5192
2BR 1BA Newl y
Renovated 407A N.
Fourth St Benton
$525mo $250dep. No
Pets Call 315-0674
BRYANT - Nice
Townhome. 3 BR, 2
BA, 1300 sq. ft., $695
mo., 501-847-5377
CAMRY COURT
in Bryant
501-804-0125
is Proud to announce
Newly open sister prop-
erty in Hot Springs
FORREST HILLS
APARTMENTS
201 South Rodgers Rd
1, 2 & 3 bedrooms
24/7 state of the art fit-
ness center, Pool, Play-
ground, fishing pond.
Private balconies
CONTACT: Savannah
OFFICE: 501-767-2626
After hours cell:
501-545-8563
Email:  forresthillsa
partments@yahoo.com
Visit our web-sites
www.arkansas
apartments.net
OR
www.apartmentguide
.com
SEEK AND YOU
SHALL FIND
Great deals in the
Courier Classifieds.
Yard Sales, Jobs,
Homes for Sale or
Rent. Check them out
daily. Call to sub-
scribe at 315-8228.
Apartments
Unfurnished
NOTICE: All real es-
tate advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to the Fair Housing
Act which makes it il-
legal to advertise any
preference, limitation
or di scr i mi nat i on
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or in-
tention to make any
such preference. We
will not knowingly ac-
cept any advertising
for real estate which
is in violation of the
law. All persons are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis.
Houses for Rent
1103 B ALCOA
(DUPLEX) 3BR
No Pets, $625mo
$625dep
501-860-5073
2318 HI LLDALE
$1100 a month - 2200
sq ft. home, 3 beds,
2.5 baths. call John
Pendleton/Truman
Ball 501-350-4527
2BR 1BA Antique house
on 2 ac, 1yr lease very
nice wrap around porch
$750mo + $750dep Call
501.303.7515
3 & 4 BEDROOM
$825 -$1400 mo.,
Haskell, Benton &
Bryant. 315-9370
3 BR 1 BA carport,
stove, dishwasher, re-
fri g. new carpet.
CH/A, fenced yard, no
pets, good location,
$650mo+$400dep.
Please call 562-0691
or 951-2919
3 BR 2 BA, 2 car garage,
4 yrs. old, $1050.mo. No
Ho u s i n g Ac c e p t e d
607-3229 or 414-6430
3 BR, 1 ba , CH/A,
kitchen appli.$675 mo
+ $500 dep. 1502
Sorrell. 612-8848
3 BR, 1.5 BA, CH/A,
W/D conn., nice loca-
tion w/appl $775mo. +
deposit. Avail. NOW!!
860-8208 anytime or
414-7188 after 4pm
3 BR, 2 BA, 2 car ga-
rage, 1800 sq. ft., Val-
ley Crest Subdv.,
$1150 mo., $800 dep.
501-840-1278
319 S. Neeley St. by
Tyndall Park. All
elect. w/fridge, dish
washer, stove, W&D
included, 3 br, 2 ba,
$850 mth. No pets ,
no smokers. (office)
501-916-9256
3BR 2BA 2 car
Garage Brick home
with fenced yard
Bryant 501-672-0407
519 PEARSON 2Br
1BA $575mo + $375
Dep. No Pet s
326-3907
BRYANT: 111 Short
St., 3 BR, 2 BA. $650
mo., $ 650 dep., 1 yr
lease. No cats/dogs.
Scott 501-580-7190
FOR LEASE/SALE
New 3 & 4 BR, 2 BA,
brick, FP, ceiling fans,
carpet, 2 car garage,
patio. Go to: www.
catalyst-residential.com
or 501-697-6342
FOR RENT 4Br 2Ba
Sardis Rd. $875mo
plus dep. Please call
944-9476
Houses for Rent
Eagle Properties
LLC
315–2075
Nice 2 & 3 BR Homes
from $500 to $925
Apartments
1 BR’s from $415
2 BR’s from $475
*based on availability
Deposit & References
Required
eaglepropsaline.com
FOR RENT or Lease
to Buy Brand New
1600 sq. ft 3Br 2Ba
will finance in Mars
Hi l l l Area on a
cul-de-sac $1113mo
Please call 944-4976
NEW 4BR 2BA
Fenced yard Vaulted
Ceilings 1800sq.ft.
$1150mo - $1250mo
Bent on School s
Please call 326-8000
Mobile Homes
For Rent
2 BR, 1 BA, Quiet
park, Benton Schools.
No Pets! Call any-
time. 501-315-1281
RENT TO OWN
'94 16x64 2br $530
'95 16x72 2br $560
'99 16x80 3br $580
'00 16x80 4br $590
Lake • Fish • Walk Trail
Sunset Lake • 951-2842
2BR 1BA STOVE
REFRIG NO PETS
317-6426 778-1993
Firewood
PREMIUM
FIREWOOD
Green/Seasoned Mix
Pick up or Delivery
840-1436
Musical
Merchandise
Cushing
Piano Service
Tune • Repair
Player Pianos & Pump Organs
778-6584
Pets & Supplies
BENTON ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
501-776-5972
benton.petfinder.com
BRYANT ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
www.bryant.petfinder.com
www.1-800-save-a-pet.com
www.1888pets911.org
Hay For Sale
HAY FOR SALE
Round Bales
Net Wrapped. Call
501-317-1365
HAY
FOR SALE
Mixed grass clean.
Fertilized. 4X5 net
wrapped. In the field
cutting now.
$
35.00 loaded
1 to 400 bales
available
Buy as many as you
need. Great horse hay.
501-840-1529 or
501-860-8080
Sport Utility
Vehicles
JEEP WRANGLER
1989 automatic
71,357 miles $1890
662-336-1039.
Houses For Sale
HOUSES & LAND for
Sale in Benton/Saline
County Call Adm. of
Estate 501-838-2874
Lots & Acreage
3 ACRES in Paron,
off Unity Road less
than 1 mile from Hwy
9 $10,000 OBO Call
606-387-6895
Public Notice
THE OWNERS of
the following ATV
must bring proof of
ownership to KB!s
Out door Power
Sports, 15522 I-30,
Benton, AR 72019,
(501) 776-0679, No
later than 45 days,
March 4, 2014 (501)
776-0679, or owner-
ship will be forfeited.
1998 Yamaha ATV  Vin#
JY4AJ01W3WA013489
Moderately Confused Herman
Crossword Challenge
Kit ‘n’ Carlyle
Celebrity Cipher
Here’s How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken
down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the
numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and
box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out the order in which
the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues
already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you
name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!
Astro•graph
BERNICE BEDE OSOL
www.bernice4u.com.
Alley Oop
Big Nate
Born Loser
Thatababy
Frank and Ernest
Grizzwells
Monty
Arlo and Janis
Soup to Nutz
SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014
Your vision, discretion and deter-
mination will lead you to the win-
ner’s circle. Remaining calm when
everyone around you is anxious will
ensure that your reputation remains
stellar. Discipline and consistency
will keep the competition or opposi-
tion you face in the background.
Partnerships will need nurturing.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- Don’t let impulse take over, or you
may make a costly mistake. Make
choices based on knowledge and
facts, not hearsay and fear of missing
out. Love should be a priority.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- Speak up and let everyone know
what you think and how you feel.
Someone will try to take advantage
of your kindness and enthusiasm if
you’re not careful. Protect your heart
and your money.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --
Join a group that will help you reach
your personal goals. Starting a diet
or a new exercise routine will get you
back on track and boost your confi-
dence.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- A
fast-paced approach to whatever
you do will attract interest. Develop
your ideas and share your thoughts.
A partnership with someone who is
pursuing a similar dream will help
you excel.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- Staying in the background may be
difficult. Someone will try to flesh
out your ideas. Focus on what you
can offer physically, rather than men-
tally, and you will avoid an unsettling
situation.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) --
Enjoy your home today. Entertain
friends and new acquaintances, and
share what you have to offer. Your
hospitality will result in an interest-
ing proposal that could lead to good
fortune.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) --
Partnerships should take top priority.
Offer something special, or make a
move on someone you want to get to
know better. An unusual discovery
will result in a moneymaking idea.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Your
willingness to make the changes that
are necessary to keep your personal
relationships running smoothly will
not go unnoticed. An unusual offer-
ing will lead to certainty and secu-
rity.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) --
Participate in community events
or activities that will allow you to
be indulgent with friends, family
or someone you love. Don’t let an
impulsive move quash your good
time.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Be
careful how you handle domestic
situations. Invest your time and
money wisely. Home improvements,
a move or altering the way you live
will result in greater happiness.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- Keep your emotions well- hidden.
Consider what you can do to help a
greater cause. A unique approach to
the way you live will make you feel
more at ease.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- Let your competitive side take
over. Play a game of chance or make
a personal change that will inspire
you to follow your dreams.
Saturday, January 18, 2014
news@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier Page 11
COMICS
12 The Saline Courier
Saturday, January 18, 2014
GM CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED SELECT MODELS AS LOW AS 1.9% APR WAC
‘12 GMC Terrain
‘12 Chevy Tahoe
‘12 GMC Acadia
‘13 GMC Sierra
‘13 Buick Enclave
‘12 Lexus LS 250
‘12 Nissan Maxima
‘12 VW Passat
SLE, PW, PL, Tilt Cruise, 49,672 miles
Z-71, 4x4, Sunroof, Rear DVD, Heated
Leather, 34,843 miles
SLE, 2nd row Captain Seats, Alloy Wheels,
Power Lift Gate, 20,766 miles
Crew, 4x4, SLT, Heated Seats, Leather, 22”
Wheel Package, Very Nice
Loaded, Sunroof, Heated Leather, Chrome
Wheels, 14,198 miles
Heated Seats, Sunroof, Loaded,
16,789 miles
SV Package, Sunroof, Navigation, Heated
Leather, 18,240 miles
SEL 2.0 TPi, Sunroof, Navigation, Heated
Leather Seats, 26,609 miles
STK #9940
STK #6903
STK #1048
STK #C5170595
STK #7596
STK #3116
$
18,900
Save thousands
vs new!!
Save thousands
vs new!!
$
25,900
$
28,900
I-30 Alcoa Exit
Next to Target
501.315.7100 BUICK • GMC
Family Owned
CUSTOMER FRIENDLY
Custom
er Austin Duncan with
Salesm
an Ronnie Everett
proud
member of
Customer Andrea and Bob Hall with
Salesman Randy Verboon
$
25,900
$
37,900
$
25,900
This document is © 2014 by editor - all rights reserved.
AttachmentSize
E-edition January 18, 2014.pdf28.41 MB
View more articles in:
The Benton Panthers baseball team could get just one hit in a 5-1 loss to the Conway Wampus Cats in...
The Benton Panthers baseball team took their first-round game of the Central Arkansas Tournament 9-...
The Bauxite Miners fell 9-6 to Maumelle in their 1st game of tourney in Mayflower, but came back...

 

Premium Drupal Themes by Adaptivethemes