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January 20, 2014

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Volume 137
Number 20
1 Section 10 Pages
50¢
Home of Jon Watson
and Elizabeth Welch
THE SALINE
INDEX
OBITUARIES .............................. 3
EDITORIAL ................................. 4
SPORTS .................................. 6,7
CLASSIFIEDS ............................ 8
COMICS ..................................... 9
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SALINE COUNTY’S NEWS SOURCE SINCE 1876
BUICK • GMC
I-30 Alcoa
Exit Next to Target
501.315.7100
2014 Encore
proud
member of
SALINE COUNTY
WEATHER FORECAST
MONDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
lower 30s.
TUESDAY: Sunny with highs in
the upper 40s.
TUESDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
upper 20s.
WEDNESDAY: Sunny with highs
in the lower 50s.
WEDNESDAY NIGHT: Lows in
the upper 20s.
THURSDAY: Mostly sunny with
highs in the upper 30s.
THURSDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
lower 20s.
FRIDAY: Mostly sunny with
highs in the upper 30s.
FRIDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
lower 20s.
SATURDAY: Sunny with highs
in the mid 50s.
SATURDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
lower 30s.
Lady Cardinals fall late
PAGE 6
TOUGH LOSS
Don Briggs 1979
PAGE 2
SCRAPBOOK
Community residents gather
to remember King’s legacy
Community residents
gathered Saturday night at
a unity service to celebrate
the legacy of slain civil rights
leader Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr.
The event at Benton’s
First United Methodist
Church began with a wel-
come from the Rev. David
Jones, senior pastor, followed
by the audience singing
songs of freedom, “Lift Every
Voice and Sing” and “Woke
Up This Morning.”
The opening prayer was
given by an area minister,
Aaron Calvin, followed by a
scripture reading by the Rev.
Daniel Thueson.
A community choir led the
audience in songs of remem-
brance, including “Precious
Lord, Take My Hand.”
Other service participants
were Robin Freeman, who
led the audience in “A Drum
Major’s Affirmation,” which
included adapted quotes
from writings, speeches and
LYNDA HOLLENBECK/The Saline Courier
Deborah Hale sings during the unity service held as part of the Martin Luther
King Jr. celebration in Benton. The service included congregational singing and
special music presented by a community choir.
Howell seeks 6th term on county Quorum Court
District 4 Justice of the
Peace Barbara Howell is
seeking a sixth term on
the Saline County Quorum
Court.
Howell’s
district includes
the northeast-
ern portion of
Saline County,
an area encom-
passing 137
square miles.
During her service on the
court, Howell has served on
the following committees:
Finance and Personnel,
Public Works and Human
Resource.
She says she has enjoyed
serving the people and
working with them and
would like to continue those
efforts.
In 2008, through her
leadership, a new bridge
was obtained over Caney
Creek.
“The old bridge was
flooded many times and left
the people at Lake Norrell
stranded during high
water,” Howell said.
She has also worked on
many other projects in the
Lake Norrell and surround-
ing areas. She has been a
board member of the Lake
Norrell Area Association for
the past 14 years, serving as
president for nine of those
years and continuing now to
serve as vice president.
She publishes a 12-page
bimonthly newsletter for
the Lake Norrell area and
is the fundraising chair-
man for the Lake Norrell
Area Association that raises
money for a Fourth of July
fireworks display and the
upkeep of the Lake Norrell
Community Center.
Howell has also been
the fundraising chairman
for the Lake Norrell Fire
Department for the past
14 years and worked with
the Salem Water Users
Association for several
years to help the area resi-
dents obtain city water.
Howell said she saw a
need in 2008 for a pavilion
to be added to the Lake
Norrell Community Center
and the pavilion was built
that year. “Large events
for the community are
held there for the Lake
Norrell Area Association
and the Lake Norrell Fire
Department,” she noted.
In 2008 when the Avilla
Community Center — the
largest voting precinct in
District 4 — was damaged
by arsonists, Howell found
help to rebuild the struc-
ture. “It was completed just
one day before the primary
election in May of 2008, but
we got it done with the help
of many people,” Howell
said.
She became the fundrais-
ing chairman in 2008 for the
Avilla Community Center
and has continued the tradi-
tion of raising money with a
pie and cake auction for the
upkeep of the building.
Howell was honored
in 2012 at Lake Norrell
with the first Lifetime
Achievement Award for her
many years of volunteerism.
She also was named as
one of Saline County’s
Extraordinary People in a
promotion sponsored by
The Saline Courier in 2012.
In 2013 Howell led efforts
to successfully obtain a
grant to put a new roof
on the Avilla Community
Center. She announced the
grant acquisition at a special
meeting on Oct. 14, 2013.
She was given spe-
cial recognition herself
by the Avilla Extension
Homemakers as the
Lifetime Fundraising
Chairman and recognized
for all the work she has
done for the center for the
past six years.
“I love working with the
members of the Quorum
Court and helping my con-
stituents,” Howell said.
She is married to Jack
Howell, a volunteer fire-
fighter for the Lake Norrell
Fire Department.
She is an active member
of the New Life Baptist
Church and takes an active
role in the Lake Norrell
Ladies Bible Study.
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
Howell
Physician
couple to
be honored
Tuesday
A retirement reception honoring two
longtime physicians at Saline Memorial
Hospital is scheduled Tuesday in the Health
Education Building of the Benton hospital.
Drs. Annette Enderlin, an ophthalmologist,
and Sam Taggart, a family practice physician
and wellness expert, are the honorees.
The two share more than an interest in
medicine: They are married to each other.
Community residents are invited to the
joint retirement event, which is set from 4 to
6 p.m.
Enderlin started her medical practice in
1993, she noted.
Since she was married to a Saline
Memorial physician, SMH was the natural
place for her to local her practice, Enderlin
said.
She had actually been employed at the
hospital in earlier years. In 1969 she opened
the first pharmacy at the hospital, working
there for 12 years.
Taggart’s first affiliation with the hospital
occurred in 1972 when SMH brought interns
from UAMS to work in the emergency room.
He was among the first group of interns.
What will Enderlin miss most when she
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
Drs. Annette Enderlin and Sam Taggart
COUPLE, page 5
HELPING HANDS
BRENT DAVIS/The Saline Courier
Roderick Fisher, left, and Terrell Anderson empty barrels into a dumpster. The men were part of a cleanup effort in
the Ralph Bunche Community this morning. The men said the barrels came from abandoned homes in the area.
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
UNITY, page 5
2 The Saline Courier
Monday, January 20, 2014
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SALINE COURIER SCRAPBOOK 1979
Courier Photo
The Westside Junior High basketball team was honored Saturday night along with other Westside
athletes at the annual sports banquet. Pictured above from left is Randy Rial, Don Briggs and Head
Coach James Cole. Rial received the trophy for top free throw shooter on the 1978-79 squad while
Briggs earned the trophies for most rebounds and most points scored in the season. The banquet
was held at the Westside Multipurpose room.
Events planned in
Arkansas to mark
MLK holiday
LITTLE ROCK — Little
Rock School District
Superintendent Dexter
Suggs will serve as the
grand marshal in an annual
event honoring the legacy of
Martin Luther King Jr.
A march-parade, or
marade, will take place at 10
a.m. Monday in Little Rock.
The marade begins at 33rd
and Chester streets and
ends at the Arkansas State
Capitol, where a commemo-
rative ceremony is sched-
uled to begin at noon.
The event is sponsored
by the Arkansas NAACP.
Other events are planned
throughout Arkansas to
mark the holiday. In Pine
Bluff, Gov. Mike Beebe is
scheduled to speak at an
event at the city’s conven-
tion center.
King was born Jan. 15,
1929, and the federal holi-
day is the third Monday in
January.
Associated Press
Sentencing set for woman in stolen horses case
MAGNOLIA — A
February sentencing date
has been set in Columbia
County Circuit Court in
southern Arkansas for an
Oklahoma woman who
pleaded guilty to the theft of
five horses and other items
from the Southern Arkansas
University rodeo team sta-
bles in Magnolia.
The Banner-News reports
that Jaci Rae Jackson, 21,
who was scheduled to be
sentenced Thursday in the
court in Magnolia, is now
to be sentenced Feb. 6. She
also faces a Jan. 27 sen-
tencing date in McCurtain
County, Okla., on charges
connected to the case.
Prosecutors have said
that Jackson faces up to 30
years in prison in Arkansas
and up to 25 years in prison
in Oklahoma.
The charges all stem from
the November 2011 theft of
five horses, a trailer and tack
from the SAU rodeo team
stables.
Four of the horses were
found malnourished and
emaciated in McCurtain
County while the fifth horse,
named Credit Card, was
found dead with its throat
cut.
Jackson’s sentencing has
been scheduled and delayed
several times.
“The state of Arkansas
has requested ... that we
bring Ms. Jackson back for
sentencing on Feb. 6, and
we will not be asking for
any delay beyond that date.
If they don’t deal with it in
Oklahoma, we’ll deal with
it here,” deputy Prosecutor
David Butler told Columbia
County Circuit Court Judge
Larry Chandler.
“It’s has been the hope
and the intention of this
court throughout almost the
past year since Ms. Jackson
entered her plea, to see
what happened in Oklahoma
before we proceeded with
sentencing in this state,”
said Chandler.
Jackson pleaded guilty
in April in Arkansas to six
counts of conspiracy to com-
mit theft of property. She
pleaded guilty in August in
McCurtain County District
Court in southeastern
Oklahoma to conspiracy to
commit theft of property,
bringing stolen property
across state lines, knowingly
concealing stolen property
and cruelty to animals.
Jackson’s mother, Wendi
Cox, was convicted in
March and sentenced to 60
years in prison for orches-
trating the theft and allowing
the animals to be hidden on
her property in southeastern
Oklahoma.
Achievement gap not a
surprise to LR schools chief
LITTLE ROCK — A
federal judge’s observation
that more must be done to
address an achievement
gap between predominantly
white and predominantly
black schools in Pulaski
County wasn’t news to the
new Little Rock School
District superintendent.
Dexter Suggs knew about
the problem — both within
central Arkansas and around
the country — when he
arrived last year.
“The achievement gap
is a national problem,”
Suggs said after a judge
last week ordered an end
to extra appropriations
for the Little Rock, North
Little Rock and Pulaski
County Special school dis-
tricts to aid in integrating
schools. “Student achieve-
ment is the ultimate goal —
providing an opportunity to
engage all students.”
To settle a 1982 lawsuit
over a racial imbalance
in schools, the state of
Arkansas has provided
more than $1 billion to the
three districts since 1989
to fund magnet programs
and student transfers. In
many regards, the money
has worked. Suggs said the
achievement gap in elemen-
tary schools has narrowed
and his district enjoys great-
er diversity.
“People from all walks of
life are in the same class-
room,” Suggs said in an
interview. “That’s a major
plus: for students to be able
to grow together.”
But in four years, the
money will be gone.
U.S. District Judge Price
Marshall last Monday
approved a settlement
among the state, the districts
and lawyers for black school-
children. Speaking from
the bench, Marshall cited
that some concerns remain,
in particular poor facilities
in Pulaski County schools,
a lack of desegregation
monitoring by the state and
continued problems with the
achievement gap.
State data show that no
county high school matched
private schools in college
preparation, and the schools
with the highest percentage
of black students had fewer
than 6 percent of its gradu-
ates ready for their first year
of college.
“We need to truly trans-
form learning for kids,”
Suggs said, but cautioned
that improving the schools
is “a marathon and not a
sprint.”
Marshall said the end of
the payments in 2018 isn’t a
finish line, but his decision
“takes us very far down the
road.” He approved the set-
tlement only after receiving
assurances from the districts
that they had plans for after
the money runs out.
Those plans include
North Little Rock reducing
the number of campuses;
Little Rock developing a
feeder system for magnet
schools; and Pulaski County
concentrating on improving
facilities.
Each district expects to
spend less on transportation
and administrative costs, and
the Pulaski County district
said it could recover nearly
all of the $20 million of extra
state aid it receives currently
through growth and loss of
financial obligations to other
districts.
And Marshall noted that
everyone had signed on the
agreement that left the state
paying more than it wanted
and the districts receiving
less than they wanted — but
that only eight objections
were filed despite it impact-
ing nearly 50,000 students.
“That unanimity is hard-
bought,” Marshall said. “We
have heard very, very few
voices opposed to this step.”
Associated Press
Associated Press
Michigan catfish record
broken 2nd time in 2 years
PLAINWELL, Mich. — It
took less than two years for
a state angler to break the
record for a catfish caught.
The new state record
flathead catfish was caught
on Jan. 12 by Dale Blakley
of Niles on Barron Lake in
Cass County. He was ice
fishing for crappies when
he landed the fish weighing
52 pounds and measuring
46.02 inches.
The record fish was
verified the next day by the
Michigan Department of
Natural Resources fisheries
biologist Brian Gunderman.
State records are recog-
nized by weight.
It broke the record
flathead catfish caught by
Rodney Akey, also of Niles,
on the St. Joseph River in
Berrien County on May 22,
2012. That fish weighed
49.8 pounds and measured
45.7 inches.
Before that fish was
caught, the record stood
since 1943.
“Catching this fish was
the most exhilarating expe-
rience,” Blakley said in a
DNR news release. “It was
only the second time I’ve
ever gone ice fishing and it
was the only bite we had on
the lake the whole day. This
definitely sits at the top of
my list.”
The DNR release said
that flathead catfish typi-
cally inhabit large river sys-
tems and based on its size
this one got into Barron
Lake several years ago,
likely through illegal stock-
ing. Transferring fish from
one water body to another
is prohibited because it can
disrupt the fish community
through predation, competi-
tion with native species and
introduction of new disease-
causing organisms.
“We’ve had numerous
state records broken in the
last couple of years, further
showcasing the quality
of Michigan’s fisheries,”
Jim Dexter, DNR fisheries
division chief, said in the
release. “We hope this latest
catch encourages anglers
to get out on the water in
search of their
own state
record — or
at least a great
adventure.”
Associated Press
Iran starts implementing nuclear deal
TEHRAN, Iran — Iran
started to shut down its
most sensitive nuclear work
on Monday, part of a land-
mark deal struck with world
powers that ease internation-
al concerns over the coun-
try’s nuclear program and
clearing the way for a partial
lifting of sanctions, the state
media said.
The United Nations nucle-
ar agency, the International
Atomic Energy Agency,
confirmed that higher-level
uranium enrichment in the
Natanz facility in central
Iran had been stopped.
Iran’s decision to halt
higher-level enrichment is
seen as a key step toward
easing Western fears over
Tehran’s nuclear program.
The West fears Iran seeks to
build a nuclear bomb. The
Islamic Republic insists the
program is solely for peace-
ful purposes.
The shutdown follows
a historic deal reached
Iran reached with world
powers in Geneva on Nov.
24 that calls for an end to
higher-level enrichment in
exchange for the lifting of
some economic sanctions.
Iranian state TV said
authorities halted enrich-
ment of uranium to 20
percent by disconnecting
the cascades of centrifuges
enriching uranium at the
facility. That level is just
steps away from bomb-mak-
ing materials.
The broadcast said inter-
national inspectors were on
hand to witness the stop-
page before leaving to moni-
tor the suspension of enrich-
ment at Fordo, another
uranium enrichment site in
central Iran.
The official IRNA news
agency said Iran also started
Monday to convert part
of its stockpile of 20 per-
cent enriched uranium to
oxide, which can be used
to produce nuclear fuel but
is difficult to reconvert for
weapons use.
Under the Geneva deal,
Iran agreed to halt its 20
percent enrichment program
but continue enrichment up
to 5 percent. It also agreed
to convert half of its stock-
pile of 20 percent enriched
uranium to oxide and dilute
the remaining half to 5
percent over a period of six
months.
In addition to the enrich-
ment measures, the six-
month interim deal also
commits Iran to opening its
nuclear program to greater
U.N. inspections and pro-
viding more details on its
nuclear activities and facili-
ties. Iran will also refrain
from commissioning its
under-construction 40 mega-
watt heavy water reactor in
Arak, central Iran.
The U.S., European Union
and other world powers are
studying the U.N. nuclear
agency report, said U.S.
State Department deputy
spokeswoman Marie Harf.
She said the U.S. would
have further comment “after
all parties have had the
opportunity to review the
report.”
In exchange for the
nuclear curbs, Iran receives
a halt to new sanctions and
easing of existing sanctions.
Measures targeting petro-
chemical products, gold and
other precious metals, the
auto industry, passenger
plane parts and services will
be lifted immediately.
The Geneva deal allows
Iran to continue export-
ing crude oil in its current
level, which is reported to
be about 1 million barrels a
day.
In Brussels, foreign min-
isters from the 28 European
Union members, gathered
for one of their periodic
consultations, were poised
to suspend some sanc-
tions for six months if U.N.
inspectors report that Iran’s
uranium enrichment efforts
have halted.
The ministers will hear
a report from EU foreign
policy chief Catherine
Ashton, who chaired the
Geneva negotiations that
led to the agreement with
Tehran. Miroslav Lajcak, the
Slovak foreign minister, told
reporters as the meeting
opened that “we are moving
in a good direction. That
means we are ready to lift
sanctions.”
The sanctions have weak-
ened Iran’s economy, and
an easing of the measures
could provide relief to ordi-
nary Iranians.
Senior officials in U.S.
President Barack Obama’s
administration have put the
total relief
figure at some
$7 billion of
an estimated
$100 billion in
Iranian assets
in foreign
banks. Iran
is to receive
the first $550
million install-
ment of $4.2
billion of its
assets blocked
overseas on Feb. 1.
British Foreign Secretary
William Hague emphasized
that only some sanctions
would be suspended once
it is clear Iran had ceased
enrichment.
“Of course other sanc-
tions will be maintained.
This is limited and propor-
tionate sanctions relief,” he
said. “Then we will get to
work at a very early stage,
as early as next month, on
the negotiation for a com-
prehensive deal to settle the
Iranian nuclear issue.”
Vice President Ali Akbar
Salehi said Iran has a total of
196 kilograms of 20 percent
enriched uranium and will
convert half of it to oxide
over a period of six months,
15 kilograms each month.
Iran, he said, will dilute the
remaining half to under 5
percent level within three
months.
Iran’s hard-liners have
called the deal a “poisoned
chalice”, highlighting the
difficult task President
Hasan Rouhani faces in sell-
ing the accord to skeptics.
Hard-line media
denounced the planned halt.
The Vatan-e-Emrooz daily
printed in black Monday
instead of its usual colors, a
sign of sorrow and mourn-
ing. It declared the deal a
“nuclear holocaust” and
called it a gift to Israel’s
Prime Minister Benyamin
Netanyahu.
“Today, Netanyahu is
the happiest person in the
world,” it said. However, the
Israeli prime minister has
made the opposite argument
as the hard-liners: He says
the deal gives Iran too much
for too few concessions.
The interim Geneva
accord will last for six
months as Iran and the
world powers negotiate a
final deal. Foreign Minister
Mohammad Javad Zarif
told reporters Saturday that
Tehran is ready to enter
talks for a permanent accord
as soon as the interim deal
goes into force.
Associated Press
Monday, January 20, 2014
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OBITUARIES
Joyce M. Lee
Joyce M. Lee, age 78, of Benton passed away on Jan. 18,
2014. She was born Sept. 8, 1935 in Murfreesboro, Tenn.
Joyce was a retired loan officer for Hurricane Creek
Credit Union and was a charter member of Highland
Heights Baptist Church.
She was preceded in death by her parents, George and
Kathrine Powers Witt; and a sister, Beth Vaughn.
She is survived by her husband, John Lee of Benton; a
son, Bart Lee and his wife, Dr. Carol Entricken; a daugh-
ter, Debbie Chambers and husband Joe; two sisters, Loyce
Griffin and Gerry Woodall; five grandchildren, Dustin Clark,
Rachel Lee, Cameron Alarcon, Coulton Lee and Easton
Alarcon.
Funeral service is scheduled for 1 p.m, Tuesday, Jan. 21,
at Ashby Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Kim Hammer
officiating. Burial will be at Mt. Olive Cemetery.
Visitation is scheduled from 6 to 8 p.m. today at the funer-
al home.
Memorials may be made to Saline Memorial Hospice
House, 23157 I-30, Bryant, AR 72022.
Online guest book: www.ashbyfuneralhome.com.
TODAY
DIAMOND SQUARES
WESTERN SQUARE DANCE
CLUB - New Dancer Program
6:30-7:30 pm. Mainstream
Program 7:30-9:00 pm, or
later. All dancers welcome.
Casual dress, square dance
attire optional. Suggested
fee $4.00 per dancer. Gordon
White, Caller. Lake Hamilton
Church, 2891 Airport Road,
Hot Springs. Information:
Gordon White 501 922-0803.
AUDITIONS for the Royal
Players’ production of Steel
Magnolias will be held
Monday and Tuesday, Jan.
20 and 21 at 6:30 p.m. at
the theater located at 111
S. Market in Downtown
Benton. There may be a
set of callbacks Jan. 23.
Production dates are March
7-10 and 14-17. Director
is Gina Welch; producer
Lisa Goodrich. The director
requests that actors audi-
tioning for Shelby be at least
seventeen. This is a non-
musical with a small cast of
women. Many people are
familiar with the Dolly Parton
movie.  Call 501-315-5483 for
more information or email
theroyalplayers.com.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 21
SALINE CROSSING REGIONAL
PARK & RECREATION AREA,
INC will meet at 5:30pm
on Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014
in the Gene Moss building
at Tyndall Park. The public
is invited and all members
are encouraged to attend
to comply with our By-laws.
We’ll continue the planning
for the 2014 Rendezvous his-
toric reenactment (second
annual) and the 200th anni-
versary of Saline County’s
first pioneer settlement
(Saline Crossing). 
MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.
DAY: Both branches of the
Saline County Library will
be closed Monday, Jan. 20
in observance of Martin
Luther King Jr. Day. They will
reopen at 9 a.m. Tuesday,
Jan. 21. Call 778-4766 for
more information.
PUPPET SHOW: All ages are
invited to a family-friendly
puppet show at 4 p.m.
Tuesday, Jan. 21 at Herzfeld
Library. Call 778-4766 for
more information.
HASKELL HISTORICAL
SOCIETY will meet Tuesday,
Jan. 21 at Haskell City Hall
at 3:30 p.m. January is time
to renew membership
dues.  During the business
meeting, election of officers
will be held. A program
will be presented by local
historian, Steve Perdue.
His topic will be the Rural
Dale And Rural Hill com-
munity and school. For more
information, please call
Emaline Stroud at 303-0384
or Darlene Emmons at 315-
2913.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22
SAFETY/SECURITY ON THE
INTERNET: Ages 18 and over
are invited to learn ways
to protect yourself, your
computer and your identity
while using the internet at 1
p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 22 at
Herzfeld Library in Benton.
No registration required. Call
778-4766 for more informa-
tion.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 23
HABITAT HOMEOWNERSHIP
APPLICATION MEETING:
Anyone interested in own-
ing a home is encouraged
to attend the Habitat
Homeownership Application
meeting set for Jan. 23 a 6
p.m. at Herzfeld Library.
THEATER TIME THURSDAY:
All ages are invited to enjoy
a family-friendly movie
selected for ages 12 and
under at 4 p.m. Thursday,
Jan. 23 at Boswell Library
in Bryant. Call 847-2166 for
more information.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 25
THEOS, A SUPPORT
GROUP FOR WIDOWS AND
WIDOWERS:,will meet for
lunch, 11:30 a.m. Saturday,
Jan. 25 at Cracker Barrel.
Saline County Library Book
Sale- The Saline County
Library book sale is sched-
uled for 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 25 at Herzfeld
Library in Benton. Admission
is free and open to the pub-
lic. Call 778-4766 for more
information.
MONDAY, JANUARY 27
GENEALOGY DATABASES
and Microfilm collection of
the Saline County Library
will be presented from 6:30-
7:30 pm at the Bob Herzfeld
Memorial Library, 1800
Smithers Drive in Benton.
DIAMOND SQUARES
WESTERN SQUARE DANCE
CLUB - New Dancer Program
6:30-7:30 pm. Mainstream
Program 7:30-9:00 pm, or
later. All dancers welcome.
Casual dress, square dance
attire optional. Suggested
fee $4.00 per dancer. Gordon
White, Caller. Lake Hamilton
Church, 2891 Airport Road,
Hot Springs. Information:
Gordon White 501 922-0803.
GAME ON! (Benton)- - Teens
are invited to play video
games from 3:30-5 p.m.
Monday, Jan. 27 at Herzfeld
Library. Call 778-4766 for
more information.
MOVIE MONDAY: All ages
are invited to enjoy a movie
specifically selected for
ages 12 and under at 4 p.m.
Monday, Jan. 27 at Herzfeld
Library. Popcorn and drinks
will be provided. Call 778-
4766 for more information.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 28
CREATIVE OUTLET: Teens
are invited to participate in
a book club and make-and-
take craft from 4-5:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Jan. 28  at Boswell
Library in Bryant. Call 847-
2166 for more information.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 31
HABITAT SOUPER BOWL
SOUP AND CHILI COOK-
OFF: Habitat for Humanity’s
Church Relations Committee
is hosting its 4th Annual
Souper Bowl Soup and Chili
Cook-Off. All proceeds will
go toward the 2014 Apostle
Build. The event is set for
Jan. 31 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
at First United Methodist
Church Family Life Center.
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8
BENTON BRIDAL EXPO is
set for Saturday, Feb. 8 at
10 a.m. at the Benton Event
Center. Everyone in atten-
dance will be entered into a
drawing for a chance to win
a $2,500 Visa gift card. For
more information call Misti
Jenkins at 870-941-2047 or
email at majenkins02@gmail.
com.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11
THEOS, A SUPPORT
GROUP FOR WIDOWS AND
WIDOWERS: 5 p.m. Tuesday,
Feb. 11 for its regular month-
ly meeting, please bring a
Valentine.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20
HABITAT HOMEOWNERSHIP
APPLICATION MEETING - 6
p.m. Feb. 20 at the Saline
County Library, 1800
Smithers Road in Benton. If
you or someone you know
is interested in owning their
own home, please attend
the Habitat Homeownership
Application Meeting.
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22
SWEETHEART PAGEANT - 1
p.m., Saturday, February 22,
at the Benton Event Center.
Applications can be picked
up at W.E.L. Dressed in
Bryant, Sisters Boutique and
Seasonals in Benton and
Ruthaleens Tot and Teen
in Malvern. Check out our
Facebook Page for more
information (Sweetheart
Pageant) or email sweet-
heart1@gmail.com.
THEOS, A SUPPORT
GROUP FOR WIDOWS AND
WIDOWERS:,will meet for
lunch, 11:30 a.m. Saturday,
Feb. 22 at Saline Memorial
Hospital.
ONGOING EVENTS
CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP
meets every third Thursday
of the month at Saline
Memorial Hospital in the
educational building from 2
p.m. to 3 p.m. Anyone who
is a caregiver is encouraged
to attend. Next meeting is
set for Thursday, Jan. 16. For
more information call Azy
Crabb at 778-6260.
TAX PREPARATION
SERVICES: Central Arkansas
Development Council is
seeking volunteers for its
VITA/EITC free tax prepa-
ration services in Saline
County. The service offers
free electronic filing of fed-
eral and state tax returns.
The service will be available
at Herzfeld Library and the
Benton Senior Wellness and
Activities Center. Volunteers
must be certified. CADC pro-
vides training. To volunteer
contact Susan Willis at 501-
778-1133.
BRYANT HISTORICAL
SOCIETY: meets 6:30 p.m.
every third Tuesday in the
Heritage Room at the Mabel
Boswell Memorial Library
in Bryant on Prickett Road.
Sudents and others are
invited to join the group in
preserving the history and
heritage of Bryant. Annual
dues are $25 for adults and
$15 for students.
TOPS: 5 p.m. Every Monday
at the Benton Main Fire
Department. Come join
TOPS Chapter 57. the group
meets every Monday. For
more information email
tops0057@yahoo.com
BENTON ALZHEIMER’s
CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP
MEETING: 7 p.m. every third
Tuesday of the month at
First Baptist Church, 211
South Market in Benton. The
meeting is open to everyone
who has a loved one living
with Alzheimer’s or other
related dementia.  The group
offers a safe environment
where discussions are kept
confidential. For more infor-
mation, please contact Sam
Sellers at (501) 663-3900 or
samuel.sellers@sbcglobal.
net. 
STARTING POINT SUPPORT
GROUP MEETING: 1 p.m.
every Sunday at Christ Is
The Answer Fellowship
Church, Traskwood. This is
a Christian-based recovery
program. Call Vince for
details 722-3110
POOL TOURNAMENT: First
and third Fridays of every
month at 7:30 p.m., Saline
County Moose Lodge,
Highway. 67, Benton. Must
be 21 to enter lodge, but
membership in lodge not
required to participate.
SALINE COUNTY HISTORY
AND HERITAGE SOCIETY
MEETING: 7 p.m., the third
Thursday of each month at
123 N. Market St. in Benton.
BRYANT HISTORICAL
SOCIETY MEETING: 6:30
p.m., the third Tuesday of
each month in the Heritage
Room of the Mabel Boswell
Memorial Library on Prickett
Road in Bryant.
HOPE ADDICTIONS
RECOVERY PROGRAM: 7
p.m. every Friday at Victory
Baptist Church, 5386
Highway 67 South, Benton. 
Call 315-5005 for more infor-
mation or for transportation
to the meeting.
SADDLES AND SPIRITS
HORSE CLUB MEETING: 6:30
p.m. the second Thursday
of each month at East End
Elementary School. For more
information, contact Melinda
Steele at 501-580-8356.
SALINE COUNTY
REPUBLICAN COMMITTEE
MEETING: 6:30 p.m. the first
Thursday of each month at
Republican Headquarters,
125 North Market Street, in
downtown Benton. Visitors
welcome
BINGO: 6:30 p.m. every
Thursday evening and every
Saturday at 1 p.m. at VFW
Post  2256.  5323 Sleepy
Village Road ( off Alcoa ). 
Members and guests wel-
come, must be 21 years of
age.  No admission charge,
kitchen will be open serving
burgers, fries, taco salads
and other items.
NONPARTISAN LAYMEN’S
STUDY OF THE ORIGINAL
INTENT OF THE FRAMERS
OF THE CONSTITUTION
MEETING: 7 p.m. the fourth
Monday of each month at
First Lutheran Church, 18181
I-30 in Benton. There is a $5
fee for materials.
SALINE COUNTY
DEMOCRATIC WOMEN’S
MEETING: 6:30 p.m. the third
Thursday of every month,
followed by the Democratic
Central Committee meet-
ing at 7 p.m., at Democratic
Headquarters, 101 S. Market
St. in downtown Benton.
STARTING POINT SUPPORT
GROUP MEETING: 1 p.m.
every Sunday at Christ Is The
Answer Fellowship Church,
Traskwood. This is a Christian
based recovery program. Call
Vince for details 722-3110
BROKEN CHAIN MINISTRIES
12-STEP RECOVERY
PROGRAM: 6 p.m. Monday
and Wednesday Community
Care Center 212 W. South St.
in Benton. For more informa-
tion call 501-672-6511.
BINGO: The VFW Post 2256
in Benton is inviting the
public to come play bingo
every Wednesday at 6:30
p.m. and Saturday at 1 p.m.
Players must be 21 or older.
Cash prizes are paid to the
winners.
SALINE COUNTY EVENTS
Email calendar items to news@bentoncourier.com or call 501-315-8228 ext. 236.
Calendar items are intended for nonprofit organizations.
PAID OBITUARY
Some Obama spy changes
hampered by complications
WASHINGTON —
Several of the key surveil-
lance reforms unveiled by
President Barack Obama
face complications that could
muddy the proposals’ lawful-
ness, slow their momentum
in Congress and saddle the
government with heavy
costs and bureaucracy, legal
experts warn.
Despite Obama’s plans to
shift the National Security
Agency’s mass storage of
Americans’ bulk phone
records elsewhere, tele-
phone companies do not
want the responsibility. And
the government could face
privacy and structural hur-
dles in relying on any other
entity to store the data.
Constitutional analysts
also question the legal
underpinning of Obama’s
commitment to setting up
an advisory panel of pri-
vacy experts to intervene
in some proceedings of the
secret Foreign Intelligence
Surveillance Court, which
oversees the NSA’s data min-
ing operations. Obama has
asked Congress to set up
such a panel, but senior fed-
eral judges already oppose
the move, citing practical
and legal drawbacks.
The secret courts now
operate with only the gov-
ernment making its case to a
federal judge for examining
someone’s phone data. Civil
libertarians have called for a
voice in the room that might
offer the judge an opposing
view.
“The devil is in the details
of how the government
collects and retains phone
records,” said Anthony
Romero, the executive direc-
tor of the American Civil
Liberties Union, “and I think
we’re going to see pretty
quickly the lack of specificity
behind some of the presi-
dent’s promises.”
Obstacles to enacting
Obama’s plans are expected
to mount quickly as admin-
istration officials and legisla-
tors grapple over what sort
of entity will oversee the
calling records swept up by
the NSA. Obama ordered
the Justice Department
and intelligence officials to
devise a plan within the next
two months.
Privacy advocates also
questioned the administra-
tion’s silence on what it will
do with hundreds of millions
of phone records, at mini-
mum, that are now kept on
file in government invento-
ries. Citing the NSA’s plans
to build a vast data storage
facility in Utah, Romero said
“there was nothing in the
president’s speech about
what’s already in the govern-
ment’s hands.”
Obama’s task force,
the Review Group
on Intelligence and
Communications
Technologies, had recom-
mended cutting the time that
the NSA could retain private
records from five to two
years. But Obama’s propos-
als do not address the issue
of duration, leaving those
records still in NSA control
for the foreseeable future.
Who or what takes over
the storage of private phone
records is also at issue.
Telephone company execu-
tives and their lawyers have
bluntly told administration
officials they do not want
to become the NSA’s data
minders. Cellular industry
executives prefer the NSA
keep control over the sur-
veillance program and would
only accept changes if they
were legally required and
spelled out in legislation.
Even with broader legal
protections to shield phone
companies from liability,
the corporations are wary of
being forced to standardize
their own data collection
to conform to the NSA’s
needs. Phone companies
already retain various forms
of customer records, but the
duration of their storage and
the kinds of records they
keep vary from less than two
years, for companies includ-
ing Verizon, US Cellular and
Sprint, to seven to 10 years,
for T-Mobile.
Shifting control of phone
metadata from the NSA to
cellular providers would cost
the government in excess
of $60 million, according to
government estimates. But
phone executives say the
need to build new technical
infrastructure and add more
staff to contend with records
demands would cost far
more.
Legal experts say that
hiring a private business or
creating a new independent
entity to store and oversee
the NSA’s phone records
is an even greater hurdle.
It is unclear whether the
government could hire a
private contractor or create
a quasi-private data storage
entity along the lines of the
Federal National Mortgage
Association, or Fannie Mae,
the government-sponsored
mortgage enterprise.
Hiring an outside private
firm might not quell public
mistrust, considering the
recent widespread hacking
into Target and other compa-
nies, experts said. Choosing
a private contractor could
backfire if the process mir-
rors the chaos of the govern-
ment’s health care website’s
early days. And relying on
a quasi-government agency
might also fail to bolster
public confidence.
“Unless this is very care-
fully drafted, the public is
going to pick this apart from
Day One,” said Stewart
Baker, a national security
law expert and former senior
Bush administration official.
Associated Press
The Saline Courier encourages readers to
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Email letters to news@bentoncourier.com or
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Benton during normal business hours.
news@bentoncourier.com
LETTER TO THE EDITOR POLICY
“Congress shall make no law ... abridging the freedom
of speech, or of the press ... .”
— From the First Amendment to Constitution
A
t last, the holiday season that began on
Halloween will finally come to a close with
Super Bowl Sunday. You may say it’s not a
holiday because most of us get Sunday off anyway,
but la-la-la-la, I can’t hear you, it’s a holiday. After that
we must wait two entire weeks, a fortnight, 14 days,
before we get another long weekend for Presidents
Day. But then you’ll have to wait until Memorial Day
to really relax.
Unless, like me, you choose to celebrate and honor
local and religious holidays by not going to work
on Texas Independence Day, Casimir Pulaski Day,
Mardi Gras, St. Patrick’s Day, Maryland Day, Prince
Jonah Kuhio Kalanianaole Day, Cesar
Chavez Day, Seward’s Day, Pascua
Florida Day, Father Damien Day,
Maundy Thursday, Patriot’s Day, San
Jacinto Day, Oklahoma Day, Arbor Day,
several Confederate Memorial Days,
Law Day, Rhode Island Independence
Day, Cinco de Mayo, Truman Day,
Mother’s Day, Armed Forces Day,
Harvey Milk Day and National
Maritime Day. Sorry, I had to leave
out a few to save a forest.
All together, I counted 36 holy
days, name days and observance days
between Presidents Day and Memorial
Day -- and that’s not counting the ones
that fall on the weekends, like Easter.
If you do celebrate Mardi Gras, do you really think
you’re going to make it to work on Ash Wednesday?
Not if you’re doing it right. But the Super Bowl is dif-
ferent. It’s the one holiday where you can overeat and
over-drink and wager on football. Whoops, I forgot:
That’s pretty much true for Thanksgiving and New
Year’s, too. Or any day they play football. Maybe this
year someone will finally come up with a Super Bowl
snack that rivals the Turducken of Thanksgiving.
Instead of turkey stuffed with a duck stuffed with
a chicken, they’ll invent the Sauguaco: a sausage
stuffed with guacamole stuffed with nachos.
But the real difference between the Super Bowl
and other holidays is that you’re supposed to show
up at work the next day and talk about it. When peo-
ple ask you if you had a nice Christmas, you could
say almost anything and it would work, because after
all, whose business is it that you had a fight with
your son-in-law and will never see your grandchildren
again? Who’s to know if your wife didn’t like the
exercise bicycle you bought her? But the Super Bowl,
you better have your facts straight. The only excuse
for missing work on Super Bowl Monday is that you
didn’t watch it -- or you watched something else. Or
maybe that’s your job, figuring out what to put on TV
opposite the Super Bowl. Commercials that sell for a
million dollars a minute on the Super Bowl must cost
pennies on the other stations. It must be infomercial
heaven. Can I hear a “ShamWow!”
Most of us are wise enough to use the bathroom
during the game and not to go during precious com-
mercials. Someone can always tell you about the
plays and the scores, but the commercials have to
be seen. I missed one last year and people had to
explain to me that I had to buy this brand of beer
because the horses that pull the wagons have good
memories. If that doesn’t make sense, you haven’t
had enough beer.
As big as football is in this country, someday soc-
cer may equal or surpass it, and certainly our national
heroes will still pass away. Which makes me wonder:
How many holidays will there be a hundred years
from now? Will every day be a holiday? Will every
weekend be three days? Will every weekend need
decorations on the outside of the house?
But in a hundred years, maybe we’ll celebrate
some holidays differently. Like by showing up for
work.
Contact Jim Mullen at JimMullenBooks.com.
F
inally, Pope Francis extends
an olive branch to conserva-
tives! Such was the tone of
the ridiculous headlines and analy-
sis in response to the pontiff’s first
annual address to the
Vatican diplomatic
corps. He happened
to point out, in case
you haven’t heard,
that he’s opposed to
abortion. “It is fright-
ful even to think
there are children,
victims of abortion,
who will never see
the light of day,” the
pope said.
Rather than check-
ing a political box -- as if he were a
political candidate meeting primary-
scorecard prerequisites -- the pope
was simply reiterating Church
teaching. Forty-one years after the
Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade ruling,
we ought to weep for the lives lost
and pain suffered, and resolve to do
better to help build a culture of life
-- an alternative reality embracing
the love that we owe one another
as loved children of a generous
Creator.
Eleanor McCullen does just
this. She is the lead plaintiff in
a Massachusetts case that the
Supreme Court heard exactly one
week before opponents of abortion
would march on Washington, as we
do every year on the anniversary of
Roe.
As Justice Antonin Scalia pointed
out time and again during oral argu-
ments, McCullen’s is not a protest
case. While the law that imposes a
35-foot buffer zone outside of abor-
tion clinics in the Bay State is sup-
posedly designed to stop women
from being harassed or intimidated,
McCullen stands outside a Planned
Parenthood clinic to offer help. If
you’re a woman who has made up
your mind and have no interest in
a stranger’s aid, she will not try to
force you to listen to her. But if you
were walking toward the clinic hop-
ing for a sign to turn around, she
may just be it. McCullen will walk
with a struggling mother. She’ll
drive you to a sonogram, she’ll drive
you for food and diapers, she’ll stay
with you -- years later, she’s a part
of the lives of the many mothers,
fathers and children she’s helped.
But the law limits her. “This law
impedes my work,” by preventing
what she can say and do outside an
abortion clinic, McCullen told press
gathered on the Court steps after the
hearing.
In a culture that veils such a
grave, irreversible decision in the
rhetoric of choice and health, this is
not simply a matter of McCullen’s
free speech rights, but a woman’s
access to information.
Outside the Court, McCullen
delivered a gentle impromptu ser-
mon. “The poorest of the poor is
the child in the womb ... Today, the
womb is the most unsafe place to be
for a child.” Despite this dire situa-
tion, McCullen is optimistic: “We are
a generous society, we are a loving
society -- we help people, and that is
what I’m trying to do.”
In her write-up of the case,
National Public Radio reporter Nina
Totenberg quoted McCullen saying,
“I go where the Holy Spirit leads
me.”
That’s the reality of McCullen’s
life. She gives voice to empathy
when talking with women trying
to cope with their pregnancy and
motherhood. She never pretends it’s
easy, but lets them know they are
not alone.
She does this because in that
unborn child, she sees the face of
Christ, as Pope Francis has similarly
said.
As McCullen walks with anyone
willing, this is her reality, a real-
ity where she knows that each and
every man and woman -- unborn,
disabled or elderly -- is loved by a
Creator who redeems suffering and
offers constant counsel. Her heart
bleeds with love for the lonely and
the desperate, for the struggling
mother who is scared and doesn’t
know where to go for support. That’s
not liberal or conservative; it’s just a
tender and compassionate presence.
McCullen is a countercultural
witness who imparts to her broth-
ers and sisters with the love of
the illuminating light of faith. The
Massachusetts buffer zone is not the
American way -- and that’s a biparti-
san position, with a brief filed from
the American Civil Liberties Union,
as well as from pro-life groups such
as the Bioethics Defense Fund -- but
it is the occasion for some supreme
enlightenment about the radical
demands of love that our politics
would like to distract us from.
Kathryn Jean Lopez can be contact-
ed at klopez@nationalreview.com.
Mrs. McCullen goes
to Washington
EDITORIAL CARTOON
I
f you thought convincing a
Republican-led Legislature to sup-
port a key part of the new federal
health care law was a tough fight last
year, wait until you see Round 2.
On the same day Gov. Mike Beebe’s
administration stressed to lawmakers
how much his budget for the coming year
depends on the state’s “private option”
Medicaid expansion, voters in northeast
Arkansas stressed to him just how tough
a fight he’ll face next month in keeping it.
Narrowly attaining the three-fourths
vote needed when it
was approved by the
Legislature last year, the
private option already
faced long odds before
lawmakers gather Feb.
10 for a session focused
primarily on the state’s
budget. The takeover of a
northeast Arkansas state
Senate seat in a special
election last week by a
Republican who ran pri-
marily on a vow to halt
the program throws into
doubt what had been
heralded as a health care model for other
states.
“It makes it more difficult to sustain the
private option,” Beebe acknowledged to
reporters.
Republican John Cooper won former
Sen. Paul Bookout’s seat after vowing
to push for the defunding of the private
option when it comes up for reauthoriza-
tion. The private option, which sharply
divided Republicans in the Legislature
last year, calls for using federal Medicaid
money to purchase private insurance
for thousands of low-income workers.
Arkansas was the first state to win federal
approval for the idea, which was touted
as an alternative to expanding Medicaid
enrollment under the federal health care
law.
Cooper painted his victory as a referen-
dum on the law.
“That was the primary issue in this
campaign. Obviously that being the case,
the voters spoke pretty clearly in this
election here,” Cooper said.
Cooper’s win just complicates things
for a law that already faced strong head-
winds — including fears of primary fights
for several Republicans who backed the
private option and well-publicized glitches
nationally with the health overhaul’s
startup.
And last week’s result leaves private
option supporters without a vote to spare.
In the Senate, the private option was
approved last year with 28 votes — just
one more than needed.
It also guarantees that next month’s
fiscal session — the third under a 2008
constitutional amendment requiring the
Legislature to meet and budget annually
— won’t be the short, drama-free gather-
ing to which they’ve grown accustomed.
Instead, they’ll face a protracted fight
over the private option and a $5 billion
budget that depends on the savings the
state expects to see from the expanded,
subsidized health coverage. Without the
private option, the state faces a $89 mil-
lion hole in its budget, Beebe’s adminis-
tration warned lawmakers last week.
“I would say that the foundation of this
budget is based on the savings that we
are expecting from the Affordable Care
Act and the private option,” Sharp said. “If
the private option weren’t done, we would
have to do a completely new budget.”
In addition to the budget argument,
supporters of the private option believe
they have policy on their side. They point
to figures released by the Department of
Human Services last week that showed
more than half of the people enrolled in
the private option are under the age of 40
— something they argue strengthens the
insurance marketplace for the state. They
also note the praise heaped on the pro-
gram by former Utah Gov. Mike Leavitt,
a Republican who is assisting DHS on the
private option.
Sen. David Sanders, a Republican who
was one of the architects of the private
option law, said the policy arguments
were what won in the debate last year
over the private option. And he said he’s
confident those arguments will win out
again.
“I think what the people of Arkansas
hope is the policy trumps personality and
even can trump politics and perceived
political realities,” Sanders said.
Andrew DeMillo has covered Arkansas
government and politics for The Associated
Press since 2005. Follow him on Twitter at
www.twitter.com/ademillo.
Steeper climb for
private option
The longest holiday
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KATHRYN
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ANDREW
DEMILLO
ARKANSAS
PERSPECTIVE
JIM
MULLEN
THE VILLAGE
IDIOT
Page 4 – The Saline Courier
news@bentoncourier.com Monday, January 20, 2014
OPINION
Breaking
news
www.bentoncourier.com
Today in world history
Today is the 20th day of 2014 and
the 31st day of winter.
TODAY’S HISTORY: In 1841,
China ceded the island of Hong
Kong to the British.
In 1885, LaMarcus Thompson pat-
ented the first roller coaster.
In 1920, the American Civil
Liberties Union was founded.
In 1981, the Iran hostage crisis
ended as 52 American captives
were released in Tehran, just after
President Jimmy Carter left office.
In 2009, Barack Obama was sworn
in as the first African-American presi-
dent.
TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS: George
Burns (1896-1996), actor/comedian;
Federico Fellini (1920-1993), direc-
tor; DeForest Kelley (1920-1999),
actor; Slim Whitman (1923-2013),
singer-songwriter; Patricia Neal
(1926-2010), actress; Edwin “Buzz”
Aldrin (1930- ), astronaut; David
Lynch (1946- ), director; Paul Stanley
(1952- ), singer-songwriter; Bill
Maher (1956- ), comedian/TV host;
Rainn Wilson (1968- ), actor; Ahmir
Thompson aka Questlove (1971- ),
musician.
TODAY’S FACT: Martin Luther
King Jr. Day was observed for the
first time on this day in 1986.
TODAY’S SPORTS: In 1892, the
first official basketball game was
played in Springfield, Mass. The two
nine-man teams used a soccer ball
and peach baskets.
TODAY’S QUOTE: “I’d rather be
a failure at something I enjoy than
a success at something I hate.” --
George Burns
TODAY’S NUMBER: 444 -- days
the hostages were held in the U.S.
embassy in Iran.
TODAY’S MOON: Between full
moon (Jan. 15) and last quarter
moon (Jan. 23).
Monday, January 20, 2014
The Saline Courier 5
1205 Military , Benton • 909-2323 • Corner of Sutherlands Shopping Center
EAT MY
Attn: Members & Guests
Now Open 7 Days a Week
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or live crawfish today!
closes her practice?
“I will miss my patients
the most,” she said.
“Sam and I both look for-
ward to spending time with
family and traveling a lot,”
she said.
Both avid outdoors
people, they plan to spend
much of their time biking
and running marathons and
triathlons, which have been
their focus as they travel.
They have traveled
extensively and plan to con-
tinue to do so in the years to
come.
Former Benton residents,
they now make their home
in Hot Springs.
Taggart, who has been
associated with Family
Practice Associates, previ-
ously was honored at that
facility.
A playwright and author
of several books, he recently
published “The Public’s
Health,” a narrative history
of health and disease in
Arkansas.
He is scheduled for book-
signing events Feb. 6 at
Smith-Caldwell Drug Store
and Feb. 27 at Herzfeld
Library.
Couple
From page 1
Jailed American appears before reporters in NKorea
PYONGYANG, North
Korea — An American
missionary who has been
jailed in North Korea for
more than a year appeared
before reporters Monday
and appealed to the U.S.
government to do its best to
secure his release.
The missionary, Kenneth
Bae, made the comments
at what he called a press
conference held at his own
request. He was under
guard during the appear-
ance. It is not unusual for
prisoners in North Korea to
say after their release that
they spoke in similar situa-
tions under duress.
Wearing a gray cap and
inmate’s uniform with the
number 103 on his chest,
Bae spoke in Korean dur-
ing the brief appearance,
which was attended by The
Associated Press and a
few other foreign media in
Pyongyang.
Bae, the longest-serving
American detainee in North
Korea in recent years,
expressed hope that the
U.S. government will do its
best to win his release. He
said he had not been treat-
ed badly in confinement.
“I believe that my prob-
lem can be solved by close
cooperation and agreement
between the American
government and the govern-
ment of this country,” he
said.
Bae was arrested in
November 2012 while
leading a tour group and
accused of crimes against
the state before being sen-
tenced to 15 years of hard
labor. He was moved to
a hospital last summer in
poor health.
He made an apology
Monday and said he had
committed anti-government
acts.
Bae said a comment
last month by U.S. Vice
President Joe Biden had
made his situation more dif-
ficult.
“The vice president of
United States said that I
was detained here without
any reason,” Bae said. “And
even my younger sister
recently told the press that
I had not committed any
crime and I know that the
media reported it.
“I think these comments
infuriated the people here
enormously. And for this
reason, I am in a difficult
situation now. As a result,
although I was in medical
treatment in the hospital
for five months until now,
it seems I should return
to prison. And moreover
there is greater difficulty
in discussions about my
amnesty.”
Bae’s appearance came
weeks after North Korea
freed an elderly American
veteran of the Korean War
who had been held for
weeks for alleged crimes
during the 1950-53 conflict.
State media said 85-year-
old Merrill Newman was
released because he apolo-
gized for his wrongdoing
and that authorities also
considered his age and
medical condition. Newman
said after his release that
a videotaped confession
was made under duress,
although he was generally
treated well.
North Korea has detained
at least seven Americans
since 2009. They were even-
tually deported or released
without serving out their
terms, some after promi-
nent Americans such as for-
mer presidents Bill Clinton
and Jimmy Carter traveled
to Pyongyang.
A senior U.S. envoy
had planned to visit North
Korea in late August to
discuss Bae’s release, but
Pyongyang withdrew its
invitation at the last minute,
accusing the United States
of hostility. Analysts said
North Korea was apparently
trying to gain leverage in a
long-running international
standoff over its nuclear
weapons program.
“We shouldn’t take
Kenneth Bae’s comments
merely as his own,” said
Kim Jin Moo, a North
Korea expert at the South
Korean state-run Korea
Institute for Defense
Analyses in Seoul. “The
reason why North Korea
had Kenneth Bae make this
statement ... is that they
want Washington to reach
out to them.”
“Bae’s comments are
an appeal to Washington
to actively persuade
Pyongyang to release him,”
Kim said.
Other foreign analysts
say North Korea wants
better ties with Seoul and
Washington as a way to
win foreign aid and invest-
ment to boost its struggling
economy.
Bae’s detention was in
the news earlier this month
after former basketball star
Dennis Rodman traveled
to Pyongyang with other
retired NBA players for
an exhibition game mark-
ing the birthday of North
Korean leader Kim Jong
Un. In an interview with
CNN while in Pyongyang,
Rodman made comments
implying Bae was at fault.
Rodman, who has been
criticized for not using his
ties with Kim to help secure
Bae’s freedom, later apolo-
gized.
Bae was born in South
Korea and immigrated to
the United States in 1985
with his parents and sis-
ter. He was allowed to call
home on Dec. 29 because
of the holidays, according
to his sister, Terri Chung.
That was the first time his
three children from an ear-
lier marriage had spoken
to him, she said. He has
two children in Arizona and
another in Hawaii, ages 17,
22 and 23, Chung said.
Before his arrest, Bae
lived in China for seven
years with his wife and
stepdaughter. He ran a tour
business and led 18 trips to
North Korea, Chung said.
Associated Press
sermons of Dr. King; and a
litany of freedom led by Tina
Jordan and Frances Holland.
Featured speaker was the
Rev. Donald Crossley, who
grew up in Benton and now
serves a church in the Hot
Springs area.
Among Crossley’s
remarks, he said, “Freedom
is not free ... It costs you
something.”
Calling King “a man of
vision,” he noted that he
“changed the moral climate
in America.”
Commending King for the
visions he had for change,
he said, “Where there is no
vision, people lose their direc-
tion.”
Referring to the strides
made toward racial equality,
Crossley said, “We’ve come
a long way in Benton, Ark.
... Who would have thought
when I was a little barefoot
boy running around on ‘the
hill’ that I would have an
opportunity to preach one
day in this Methodist church?
“Things have changed,”
he said.
“We’ve come a long way
(toward racial equality), but
we’ve still got a long way to
go,” Crossley added. “We
have not arrived, but we have
made some great strides.
“Racism today is not gone;
it’s just more sophisticated,”
he said. Then he added,
“Yet to see us all sitting here
together, we do have diver-
sity.”
Referring to the theme
of the King celebration this
year, “Keep On Moving,” he
said, “Whatever we have to
do, we have to keep on mov-
ing.”
Winners of an essay con-
test held in conjunction with
the King celebration were
announced by Evelyn Reed
of the Central Arkansas
Development Council and
Bobbye Pyke of The Saline
Courier.
Before the final gospel
song, “Precious Lord, Take
My Hand,” the service
included 39 seconds of silent
prayer and meditation in
commemoration the 39 years
of King’s life.
Special music was pre-
sented by a community choir.
Instrumentalists for the event
were Sandy Knorenschild,
organist, and Terry Brown,
pianist.
The service concluded
with the singing of “We Shall
Overcome,” traditionally asso-
ciated with the civil rights
movement in this country.
Other service participants
were minister Aaron Calvin,
Deborah Hale and Farisha
Barnes Brown.
Unity
From page 1
Scientists hope comet-chaser spacecraft wakes up
BERLIN — Europe’s
Rosetta probe is due to
wake up from years of
hibernation Monday, but
scientists face an agoniz-
ing wait of several hours
until the first signal reaches
Earth and they can cel-
ebrate a new milestone in
their unprecedented mis-
sion to land a spacecraft on
a comet.
Dormant systems on the
unmanned spacecraft were
scheduled to switch back
on at 11 a.m. (1000 GMT;
5 a.m. EST) in preparation
for the final stage of its
decade-long mission to ren-
dezvous with comet 67P/
Churyumov-Gerasimenko.
They had been powered
down in 2011 to conserve
energy, leaving scientists in
the dark about the probe’s
fate until now.
“We don’t know the
status of the spacecraft,”
said Paolo Ferri, head of
mission operations at the
European Space Agency.
“There is a possibility that
we’re not going to hear
anything. Two-and-a-half
years are a long time. We’re
talking about sophisticated
electronics and mechanics.
We’ve taken all possible pre-
cautions for this not to hap-
pen but of course we cannot
exclude that problems may
have happened.”
Scientists will bridge
the time between Rosetta’s
alarm going off and the first
signal traveling the 800 mil-
lion kilometers (500 million
miles) back to Earth by
holding a social media com-
petition. Space enthusiasts
are being asked to compose
and perform songs to “wake
up Rosetta,” with the top
entries being beamed to
the spacecraft and the win-
ner invited to witness the
landing from ESA’s mission
control room.
The agency says the
earliest it might receive the
probe’s all-clear call is about
6.30 p.m. (1730 GMT; 12:30
p.m. EST). If no signal is
received by Tuesday, sci-
entists will try to manually
restart the probe from the
ground.
Rosetta is named after a
block of stone that allowed
archeologists to decipher
ancient Egyptian hiero-
glyphs. Scientists hope
the probe’s findings will
help them understand the
composition of comets and
thereby discover more
about the origins and evolu-
tion of our solar system.
Comets are regarded
as flying time capsules
because they are essentially
unchanged for 4.6 billion
years. Scientists have
speculated that comets —
which are essentially giant,
dirty snowballs — may be
responsible for the water
found on some planets. And
like asteroids, comets also
pose a theoretical threat to
life on Earth.
“Over the millennia com-
ets have actually affected
our evolution,” said Ferri.
“There are many theo-
ries about comets hitting
the Earth and causing
global catastrophes. So
understanding comets is
also important to see in the
future what could be done
to defend the Earth from
comets.”
If all goes as planned,
Rosetta will reach 67P in
the coming months and
fly a series of complicated
maneuvers to observe the
comet — a lump of rock
and ice about four kilome-
ters (2.5 miles) in diam-
eter — before dropping a
lander onto its icy surface in
November.
The Philae lander will
dig up samples and analyze
them with its on-board
instruments.
The probe and its lander
will keep sending back data
until their batteries die or
the debris streaming off the
comet irreparably damages
their sensitive instruments.
The mission is different
from NASA’s Deep Impact
probe that fired a projectile
into a comet in 2005 so
scientists could study the
resulting plume of matter.
NASA also managed to land
a probe on an asteroid in
2001, but comets are much
more volatile places because
they constantly release dust
and gas that can harm a
spacecraft.
NASA is planning another
space rock mission between
2019 and 2021. The agency
is looking into sending a
robotic spaceship to lasso
a small asteroid and haul it
close to the moon, where
spacewalking astronauts
would explore it.
Associated Press
LYNDA HOLLENBECK/The Saline Courier
Two of several essay winners recognized at the unity service held as part of the Martin Luther King Jr.
celebration in Benton included eighth-graders Bailey Redden, left, who received a first-place honor at
the junior high level; and Jared Hastings, who received a second-place honor.
Page 6 – The Saline Courier
sports@bentoncourier.com Monday, January 20, 2014
SPORTS
SALINE
SCOREBOARD
TUESDAY
Basketball
Benton at Texarkana, 5 p.m.
Bryant at Sheridan, 5 p.m.
Bauxite at Arkadelphia, 5 p.m.
BHG at Perryville, 4 p.m.
FRIDAY
Basketball
Benton vs. Lake Hamilton, 5 p.m.
Bryant vs. Texarkana, 5 p.m.
Bauxite vs. Nashville, 5 p.m.
BHG vs. Mayflower, 5 p.m.
Harmony Grove falls
in final seconds, 42-38
STEVEN LOVELL/Special to The Saline Courier
Harmony Grove’s Lydia Windsor tries to drive past an eStem
defender during the Lady Cardinals’ loss on Jan. 13. Harmony
Grove fell to Glen Rose in the final seconds on Friday, moving its
overall record to 3-13 on the year.
GLEN ROSE -- The
Harmony Grove Lady
Cardinals (3-13 1-6) were
prescribed a bitter pill to
swallow on Friday in a 42-38
loss to rival Glen Rose. With
14.7 seconds left in the
game and a 38-37 lead, Lady
Cardinal Cassie Dixon got
whistled for the shooting
foul on Glen Rose’s Morgan
Roach, sending her to the
foul line for two shots. The
call sent Harmony Grove
into shock and disbelief on
the sideline.
Roach knocked down
both shots to give the Lady
Beavers a 39-38 lead. Still
with time to get a decent
shot off, Dixon brought the
ball down the floor before
getting hacked on the
offensive end but no foul
was called. Dixon was then
whistled for the flagrant foul
after pushing a Lady Beaver
to stop the clock. Already
with two open free throws
By Josh Briggs
jbriggs@bentoncourier.com
LADY CARDS, page 7
Baptist outlasts
Miners, 55-50
BAUXITE - Even as win-
ters chill maintains its bitter
grasp on central Arkansas,
things continue to heat up
in the arena of conference
4A high school basketball.
For week ten of their ambi-
tious season, the Bauxite
Miners invited the Eagles
of Arkansas Baptist to Fred
Dawson Gymnasium for a
fast-paced game filled with
sharp team play and full-
court hustle. This one was
a fight to the very end. The
Miners presented quite a
challenge to the Eagles who
had just recently handed
losses to both Malvern and
Central Arkansas Christian.
The Miners clearly took
their play to a higher level
of intensity, but this effort
proved inadequate in tak-
ing victory from the grasps
of the Eagles who held on
just long enough to fly away
with a conference victory.
Arkansas Baptist pulled
away in the last few minutes
to win by only five points
with a final of 55-50.
Bauxite (8-8, 2-4 7-4A)
won the jump and got
the first score on a drive
from the right side by Ben
Madison. Arkansas Baptist
then responded with a base-
line drive of their own. With
about four minutes lapsed
in the first half, Bauxite’s
Madison put down his first
three of the night and simul-
taneously gave the Miners
their first lead of the game.
The Miners showed how
well they could play as a
team when Bradly McCool
set an effective pick for
Madison who scored again
on a run along the baseline.
This play gave the Miners
the edge at the end of the
first eight minutes, moving
Bauxite ahead by a score of
17-13.
McCool gave the Miners
a strong start in the second
period when he rebounded,
was fouled going back up,
and then made both free
throws. Hunter Holder then
gave the Miners their third
3-point bucket. And with
By A.J. Russenburg
jbriggs@bentoncourier.com
MINERS, page 7
You Da Man-ning
Broncos punch ticket to big dance
DENVER — Only three
years ago, Peyton Manning
could barely grip a football,
let alone throw one.
A Super Bowl quarter-
back? Nobody had ever over-
come those kind of odds.
On Sunday, he wrote the
next chapter in one of foot-
ball’s most remarkable come-
back stories, outplaying Tom
Brady to lead the Broncos to
the Super Bowl for the first
time since John Elway took
the snaps in Denver some 15
years ago.
Manning crafted yet anoth-
er impeccable masterpiece,
throwing for 400 yards in a
26-16 victory over Brady and
the New England Patriots.
“Being in my 16th season,
going to my third Super
Bowl, I know how hard it is
to get there,” Manning said.
He’ll try to become the
first starting quarterback to
lead two different teams to
titles.
On his way out of Indy,
Manning’s comeback attempt
began a while after his fourth
neck surgery, when he tried
to play catch with an old col-
lege buddy, Todd Helton,
who then played for the
Hogs don’t want it as bad as opponent
M
ike Anderson
began this bas-
ketball season
believing for two reasons
his Razorbacks would
improve from 1-8 dreadful
to at least C-minus passable
on the SEC
road.
Arkansas
would
rebound bet-
ter, Anderson
reasoned.
And while not
having any
one player
with the scor-
ing potential
of turned pro
2012-2013
underclassmen BJ Young
and Marshawn Powell, these
Hogs, Anderson said, had
more scorers that could
supply a bucket or two snap-
ping the scoring droughts
so often afflicting the Hogs
away from home.
For their rebounding and
inability to snap prolonged
scoreless scores, give these
Razorbacks an F following
their latest SEC venture
outside of Arkansas. In last
Saturday’s 66-61 overtime
loss to the Georgia Bulldogs
at Georgia’s Stegeman
Coliseum in Athens, the
Razorbacks were out-
rebounded 56-34. Georgia’s
24 offensive boards were
just 10 less than Arkansas’
total for both boards.
“When you get out-
rebounded by 22, that to
me is the most disappoint-
ing because rebounding
is effort,” Anderson said.
“That is something we have
to correct and we may have
to correct that with person-
nel. We may have to get
some other guys on the floor
because we have just as
good as size as Georgia. It’s
how bad do you want it?”
Arkansas was outrebound-
ed 50-32 by the Kentucky
Wildcats its previous game
Jan. 14, but won an 87-85
overtime epic by dominating
the turnover battle, commit-
ting just six to Kentucky’s
17, and avoiding prolonged
scoring droughts.
Compounding the Hogs
being erased on the boards
at Athens, for four junctures
spanning beyond four min-
utes, one entirely scoreless
for 6:58, the Hogs couldn’t
produce a field goal. In
both halves, the Hogs led
the first 29-28, Arkansas
had leads it perched on the
verge of expanding, espe-
cially when a brief resur-
gence on the boards helped
Arkansas to lead by seven
during the second half,
before the scoring well ran
dry including some 2-on-1
fast breaks gone awry.
“Yeah, we came out and
fought and scratched and
had a little seven-point lead,”
Anderson said. “But we
had opportunities to lay it in
and we didn’t and we never
could ease out any more and
that enabled them to get to
the free-throw line. They
had 39 free throws. That’s a
bunch of free throws there
and 24 offensive rebounds.
That tells you the hustle
part of them getting 10 team
rebounds. That means they
were getting all the loose
balls.”
Apparently Arkansas was
getting there just in time to
foul. The Hogs were whis-
tled 29 times to Georgia’s 20
and were badly beaten on
the free-throw line, 12 of 20
to 28 for 39.
And yet with all that
against them, the
Razorbacks with it knotted
52-52 had the ball in guard
Ky Madden’s hands the
last 21 seconds in overtime
before he missed a 3-pointer
that bounced off the basket
out of bounds, sending the
game to OT at 52-52.
Madden had taken the
last shot in the overtime
against Kentucky, a missed
3-pointer that Michael
Qualls rebounded mid-air
and stuffed home with :00.4
on the clock for the 87-85
triumph. Qualls had no
time nor no way to retrieve
the miss bouncing out of
bounds in Athens. It just
wasn’t Qualls’ day anyway.
He hit but 1 of 10 of shots
and scored three points in
Athens after he and Madden
shared scoring honors with
18 each against Kentucky.
Madden scored 12 in
Athens, but the missed
opportunity to attack
the basket in OT made
Anderson wince.
“We wanted to attack the
basket,” Anderson said. “We
had the opportunity.”
NATE ALLEN
RAZORBACK
REPORT
AP
Denver quarterback Peyton Manning celebrates with a double fist pump after throwing a touchdown
last season. Manning and the Broncos swept past New England on Sunday to earn a trip to Super Bowl
XLVIII in two weeks.
Locals get
it done for
Lady Backs
FAYETTEVILLE -
Jacksonville and Cabot
became Sunday’s co-capitals
of Arkansas Razorbacks
women’s basketball.
For without the com-
bined 45 points of freshman
post Jessica Jackson of
Jacksonville and sophomore
forward Melissa Wolff of
Cabot, Coach Tom Collen’s
Razorbacks definitely do not
defeat Ole Miss as Arkansas
did 68-65 Sunday afternoon
before 1,975 at Walton Arena.
The Jackson-Wolff pro-
pelled triumph, shooting
Arkansas to a 16-point lead
(45-29) with 16:24 left in the
game that lapsed to peak
Ole Miss’ seven-point advan-
tage (54-47) with 7:10 left
requiring the Jackson-Wolff
Razorbacks rescue, upped
Arkansas to 15-4, 2-4 in the
SEC and a Thursday bye
before next Sunday’s visit to
Kentucky.
Among Jackson’s career-
high 31 points and Wolff’s
14, tying her career high set
in Arkansas’s other SEC vic-
tory this season at Missouri,
were Jackson’s go-ahead
free throws (66-65) with 37
seconds left. Then Wolff
rebounding the miss by Ole
Miss’ Diara Moore with 15
second and getting fouled
and sinking both free throws.
That 68-65 cushion com-
pelled Ole Miss point guard
Valencia McFarland, devastat-
By Nate Allen
Razorback Report
ARKANSAS, page 7
Associated Press
BRONCOS, page 7
Seahawks
defense too
much for 49ers
SEATTLE — Pete Carroll
knows all about successfully
chasing championships. Yet
this pursuit is particularly
sweet.
“It’s quite a magical
moment,” Carroll said Sunday
after his Seattle Seahawks
won the NFC title. “You can’t
really grasp the moment. Did
we really do this?”
Yep. The Seahawks and
their 12th Man are headed
for the Big Apple and the
Super Bowl.
“Every ounce of your
energy, every moment spent
watching film has been worth
it, because we made it,” said
All-Pro cornerback Richard
Sherman. His game-saving
deflection in the end zone
with 22 seconds left was
caught by teammate Malcolm
Smith to clinch the 23-17
win over division rival San
Francisco on Sunday night.
“It’s fantastic.”
A fantastic matchup, too.
Seattle will meet Denver
(15-3) for the NFL title in
two weeks in the New Jersey
Meadowlands. It’s the first
trip to the big game for the
Seahawks (15-3) since they
lost to Pittsburgh after the
2005 season.
The conference champs
had the best records in the
league this year, the second
time the top seeds have got-
ten to the Super Bowl in 20
seasons. It also is a classic
confrontation of Denver’s
record-setting offense led
by Peyton Manning against
the NFL’s stingiest defense.
Denver opened as a 1-point
favorite over Seattle on the
Glantz-Culver Line.
“We wouldn’t have it any
other way,” said Sherman,
who went on a rant about
how 49ers wideout Michael
Crabtree is a ‘sorry receiver.’
“They’re an unbelievable,
record-setting offense with
a Hall of Fame quarterback.
That’s as tough a game as
you can get in the Super
Bowl. The No. 1 defense
against the No. 1 offense. It
doesn’t happen like this too
often.”
That top-ranked defense
forced three fourth-quarter
turnovers, and Russell Wilson
threw a 35-yard touchdown
pass to Jermaine Kearse on
fourth down for the winning
points.
Moments after Sherman
tipped Colin Kaepernick’s
pass to Smith for the intercep-
tion, the NFL leader in picks
did a CenturyLink Leap into
the stands behind the end
zone, saluting the Seahawks’
raucous fans. With 12th Man
flags waving everywhere
— receiver Golden Tate
paraded around the field with
one — and “New York, New
York” blaring over the loud-
speakers, CenturyLink Field
rocked like never before.
“This is really special,”
said Carroll, who won two
national championships at
Southern California and has
turned around the Seahawks
in four seasons in charge. “It
would really be a mistake to
not remember the connection
and the relationship between
this football team and the
12th Man and these fans. It’s
unbelievable.”
San Francisco (14-5) led
17-13 when Wilson, given
a free play as Aldon Smith
jumped offside, hurled the
ball to Kearse, who made a
leaping catch in the end zone.
“He’s tremendous catch-
ing the football,” Wilson
said. “He’s got great hands,
and he’s got that desire, you
know?”
Associated Press
Monday, January 20, 2014
The Saline Courier 7
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See Saline M A G A Z I N E
S P R I N G 2 0 1 2 I S S U E
THERE ARE MANY DIFFERENT SPOTS
IN SALINE COUNTY FOR ONE TO ENJOY
A NICE SWIM, A DAY OF FISHING OR
EVEN A COMPETITIVE CANOE RACE ON
THE SALINE RIVER
MORE INSIDE ON:
Where to golf in Saline
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Museums, libraries and more
Fishing hole secrets
The Saline Courier along with the
entire media industry has experienced
numerous changes since its inception.
Over the years many predictions have
included the demise of print media. First
there was radio, then television and now
the Internet. Yet, through them all, The
Saline Courier remains an award winning
daily newspaper reporting the local news
Saline county residents seek. We are
proud to be a part of Saline County as its
oldest, continuously operated business.
oldest, cccontinuously operated business. o
321 N. Market St., Benton - 301-313-8228
coming, the Lady Beavers
got two more after Harmony
Grove Head Coach John
White threw his clip board
and received the technical
foul, ultimately ending the
Lady Cardinals chance at a
victory.
“We played really hard
and just weren’t able to close
it out,” White said. “Whether
it was turnovers or missed
free throws or them hitting
some big shots, you have to
give them credit. They made
plays they had to make to
win it.”
The game was very close
the entire night. Harmony
Grove took control early in
the first quarter, jumping
out to an 11-3 lead midway
through the first. But Glen
Rose, though not as domi-
nate as in past years, fought
back hard to pull within
11-8 still with time to tick in
the opening quarter. Sarah
Jackson drained a short
jumper to push the Lady
Cardinals ahead 13-10 with
seconds left before Morgan
Efrid knocked down a jump-
er of her own at the buzzer
to end the opening frame
15-10 Lady Cardinals.
After a good showing to
begin the game, Harmony
Grove fell flat for most of
the second quarter. Trailing
by five to being the second,
Glen Rose quickly cut it to a
one-point contest with 5:27
left in the half before taking
the lead 30 seconds later.
Katie Wright tied the
game back at 17-17 with a
free throw, but Roach con-
tinued to shoot well putting
the Lady Beavers back up
by two, 19-17, on the next
possession. After a number
of missed shots and free
throws by both teams, Glen
Rose took its biggest lead of
the night at 22-17 with three
minutes left in the half.
Lady Cardinal Riana
McElroy finally ended
Harmony Grove’s score-
less stretch with a layup
with 2:27 left to play. After
a missed Roach jumper
and Jackson rebound, Efrid
tied the contest once again,
22-22, with a big 3-pointer
with 1:56 on the clock.
McElroy put the Lady
Cardinals back in front on
another short shot after
snatching the offensive
board, giving Harmony
Grove the 24-22 halftime
lead.
After back-to-back quar-
ters of good scoring, both
teams fell extremely flat,
combining for nine points
total in the third quarter
leaving the Lady Cardinals in
front, 28-27, heading to the
controversial fourth quarter.
Down by a single digit,
Glen Rose struck quickly,
taking a 29-28 lead on anoth-
er clutch shot from Roach.
After straight misses from
Wright and Dixon, Roach
put the Lady Beavers out in
front 31-28 with 5:40 left in
the game.
Harmony Grove finally
scored in the final quarter
on two good free throws
from Wright to pull the Lady
Cardinals back within one,
31-30. After a big forced
turnover, Harmony Grove
took back the lead, 32-31 on
a jumper from Dixon with
4:52 left.
The lead was short-
lived once again as Glen
Rose stole it back, 33-32,
on the next possession.
Both squads continued to
exchange leads down to
the final few seconds of
the game before Glen Rose
ended the contest with
clutch foul shots, giving
Harmony Grove its 13th loss
of the season and sixth in
5-3A action.
The game saw 12 lead
changes and 42 turnovers.
Kristen Dempsey led
Harmony Grove with nine,
followed by Jackson and
Wright with seven. Jackson
pulled down 11 rebounds,
five on the offensive end.
“We were pretty bal-
anced,” White said. “We
would have liked to take
advantage of a few more
opportunities. We had sever-
al fast-break chances where
we just threw the ball away.”
Harmony Grove turned
the ball over 20 times in the
game.
Efrid added five in the
loss.
Roach led all scorers 14
including 6 of 10 from the
foul line.
Harmony Grove heads
into the second half of
the conference season on
Tuesday at Perryville after
finishing 1-6 in the first half.
“We have got to hang in
there and find what works
for us,” White said. “We
have to keep working. That’s
what it is going to take.”
Lady Cards
From page 6
about three minutes remain-
ing in the first half, Bauxite’s
Madison had one of his
best minutes this season.
Madison knocked down a
three at his end of the court
directly followed by a block
at the other, then a tip, a
steal, and finally a dunk.
Following this moment of
brilliant play Bauxite was
able to march off proudly to
the locker room winning at
the half by a score of 29-28.
Arkansas Baptist opened
the second half by making a
free throw to bring the score
back to even. At the three-
minute mark Bauxite’s Zack
Baxley was able to secure a
steal which he passed off to
Holder. Holder then passed
far down the court to a wait-
ing Madison. Madison then
had his second most spectac-
ular play of the night when
he drove from the left side.
Madison drove past one
Eagle defender, then faked
to his right over another, and
finally put the ball up again
over a third defender and
came down with two more
points for Bauxite. Bauxite’s
Dylan Melton finished the
third period for the Miners
by throwing the ball in for
a score from at least 30 feet
with only one-tenth of a sec-
ond remaining on the clock.
This play brought out great
enthusiasm from the Miners’
fans and kept the score close
at the end of three with the
Eagles leading 43-41.
Madison and McCool both
got scores for Bauxite in the
fourth, but Arkansas Baptist
would outplay the Miners in
the fourth period picking up
the five-point win.
The Miners won the first
half and would have most
likely taken another victory
if not for a questionable
charging call in the last few
minutes. Madison had anoth-
er great game and surpassed
his scoring average.
The Miners played this
team with as much inten-
sity and toughness as any
game so far this year and
will be looking forward to
a rematch with the Eagles
in three weeks. Bauxites
next game will be played at
Arkadelphia.
Miners
From page 6
BOB MCADORY/Special to The Saline Courier
Bauxite guard Ben Madison leaps to the basket between two CAC
defenders during a game earlier this season. Madison scored 36 in
the loss.
Colorado Rockies.
The first pass left
Manning’s hand and flut-
tered to the ground. Helton
thought Manning was joking.
He wasn’t.
Fast forward three years
and there he was, on a
splendid, 63-degree day in
Denver, winging it to the
receiving corps Elway put
together when he returned
to the Broncos as a front-
office executive.
One of those receivers,
Demaryius Thomas, caught
seven passes for 134 yards
and a touchdown to cap off
one of Manning’s two 7-min-
ute-plus touchdown drives.
“To keep Tom Brady on
the sideline is a good thing,”
Manning said. “That’s some-
thing you try to do when
you’re playing the Patriots.”
After kneeling down to
seal the victory, Manning
stuffed the ball into his hel-
met, then ran to the 30-yard
line to shake hands with
Brady. A bit later in the
locker room, he celebrated
with his father, Archie, and
brothers Cooper and Eli.
Asked what pregame
advice he gave his younger
brother, Cooper said: “Go
ahead and pretend you’re
a 10-year-old playing in the
front yard. That’s what it
looked like” today.
Indeed, Manning did
whatever he wanted. And
though he threw for 400
yards, it was more dink-and-
dunk than a fireworks show
in this, the 15th installment
between the NFL’s two best
quarterbacks of a generation.
(Manning is 5-10, but now
2-1 in AFC title games).
Manning set up four field
goals by Matt Prater and put
his stamp on this one with
the long, meticulous touch-
down drives.
He geared down the no-
huddle, hurry-up offense that
helped him set records for
touchdown passes and yard-
age this season and made
the Broncos the highest-
scoring team in history.
The result: 93- and 80-yard
touchdown drives that were
the two longest, time-wise, of
the season for the Broncos
(15-3).
The Broncos held the ball
for 35:44. They were 7 for 13
on third-down conversions.
Manning capped the
second long drive with a
3-yard pass to Thomas, who
got inside the overmatched
Alfonzo Dennard and left
his feet to make the catch.
It gave Denver a 20-3 lead
midway through the third
quarter.
From there, it was catch-
up time for Brady and the
Pats (13-5), and they were
not built for that — at least
not this year.
“We got in a hole there,”
Brady said. “It was just too
much to dig our way out.”
A team that averaged
more than 200 yards on the
ground the last three games
didn’t have much quick-
strike capability. Brady, who
threw for most of his 277
yards in comeback mode,
actually led the Patriots to a
pair of fourth-quarter touch-
downs. But they were a pair
of time-consuming, 80-yard
drives. The second cut the
deficit to 26-16 with 3:07 left,
but the Broncos stopped
Shane Vereen on the 2-point
conversion and the celebra-
tion was on in Denver.
“Losing is never easy,”
Patriots defensive lineman
Rob Ninkovich said.
Broncos
From page 6
ing on dish and drives with
five assists and hitting just
one 3-pointer among her 25
points, attempting her second
and final trey that fell awry in
the attempt for the tie as time
expired.
Jackson scored 18 in the
first half that Arkansas led
37-28 and would increase
to 16 (45-29) on Jackson’s
layup at 16:24. Wolff scored
eight of her 14 in the final
4:01. Between them, Jackson
and Wolff’s combined for 18
rebounds (10 for Jackson
and eight for Wolff) helped
Arkansas lead the boards,
39-36, with Jackson and Wolff
both getting key rebounds
down the stretch.
Ole Miss Coach Matt
Insell and Collen both were
impressed.
“Jessica Jackson is a
great player,” Insell said. “I
recruited Jessica very hard
when I was at the University
of Kentucky. She is the type
player that if she is in your
state you have to get. And
Tom Collen and his staff did a
great job getting her to come
here to this great university.”
Arkansas
From page 6
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Page 8 – The Saline Courier
class@bentoncourier.com Monday, January 20, 2014
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Legal Notices
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
Notice is hereby given that on the 3rd day of
February 03, 2014 in accordance with ACA
§ 14-22-101, bids will be accepted by the
County of Saline for the office of the Saline
County Tax Collector for Document Scan-
ning. Specifications regarding the bid may
be obtained at the Saline County Court-
house, Purchasing Office Rm. 116. All bids
must be received in the office of the Saline
County Tax Collector, 215 N. Main Street,
Benton, Arkansas no later than 10:00 a.m.,
Monday February 3, 2014 where they will be
opened and read aloud.
The Saline County Judge shall have the
right to reject any and all bids received.
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS
PROBATE DIVISION
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
RILEY PLUNKET GILL,Jr., Deceased NO. 63PR-14-003-4
NOTICE
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS OF DECEDENT:
4207 Glenda Lane; Benton, Arkansas 72019
DATE OF DEATH: November 30, 2013
An instrument dated November 6, 1986, was on the 6th day of
January, 2014, admitted to probate as the Last Will of the
above-named decedent and the undersigned has been appointed
Executor thereunder. Contest of the probate of the will can be ef-
fected only by filing a petition within the time provided by law.
All persons having claims against the estate must exhibit them,
duly verified, to the undersigned within six (6) months from the date
of the first publication of this notice, or they shall be forever barred
and precluded from any benefit in the estate. Claims for injury or
death caused by the negligence of the decedent shall be filed within
six (6) months from the date of first publication of the notice, or they
shall be forever barred and precluded from any benefit in the estate.
This notice first published the 19th day of January, 2014.
David W. Gill, Executor
4204 Stoneybrook Drive, Bryant, Arkansas 72089-0710
Law Office of Paul D. White, P.A.
301 Roya Lane, Suite 4, P. O. Box 710, Bryant, Arkansas 72089-0710
(Ark. Bar No. 92198), Attorney for the Estate
8 Courier Thursday, February 4, 2010
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17332 I-30 N. • Benton • 501-778-9444
(Located in front of Tinseltown)
www.touchdownsallys.com
10
Flat Screen TV’s
to watch
all of the games!
Video Arcade

6 Flat Screen TV’s
for Remote Trivia
“Saline Countys Newest Restaurant”
Kickoff Weekend
Sept. 10th -14th
• Food
• Family
• Football
• Fun
ATTENTION MEMBERS & GUESTS
Super Bowl Savings!
A great value for a
super weekend!
For $70 - your ad can
appear on the Super
Bowl Savings page in
the Saline Courier on
Super Thursday,
January30th, and
Sunday, February 2
the day of the game
for one low price!
$
70
Take advantage of this super special.
Space is limited. Deadline is Jan 28.
Call Cathy TODAY 315-8228.
321 N. Market St. • Benton • 315-8228
www.bentoncourier.com
Thursday, January 30, 2014
Family Owned and Customer Friendly
501.315.7100 • Interstate 30 at Alcoa Exit
21099 I-30 Bryant, AR 72202 • www.everettbpg.com
Bullock’s
Superstop
15536 Interstate 30
Exit 116
Benton, AR 315-3898
Continuous Service for 32 Years
501-315-8333
824 Military Rd.
Benton
Garage Sales
I BUY Junk Cars
Call Jerry Toland
332-7202 • 840-6756
Announcements
DIVORCE WITH or
wi t hout chi l dr en
$125.00. Incl udes
name change and
property settlement
agreement. SAVE
hundreds. Fast and
Easy. Call 1-888-733-
7165, 24/7.
Adoption
LOVING, HAPPILY
mar r i ed coupl e
wishes to adopt infant
and give love, laugh-
ter, and stabi l i ty.
Please call Mara and
Wi l at 1- 800-
983-9095. Expenses
paid.
Personal
HAVE FUN and find a
genuine connection!
The next voice on the
other end of the line
could be the one. Call
Tango
1-800-955-3137.
FREE trial!
MEET SINGLES right
now! No paid opera-
tors, just real people
l i ke you. Browse
greetings, exchange
messages and con-
nect live. Try it free.
C a l l n o w
1-877-939-9299
Employment
12 PRO DRIVERS
NEEDED... Full Bene-
fits + Top 1% Pay,
Recent Grads Wel-
come., CDL A Req.,
877-258-8782
www.Ad-Drivers.com
Classifieds Work!
Employment
ACCESSION CLERK
needed Must be a
quick learner, excel-
lent typing skills re-
quired Mon-Fri 1p-5p
Call 920-2255
CDL DRIVER TRAINEES!
Become a driver for
Roehl Transport !
Roehl is a Certified
"Top Pay Carrier"!
NEW Drivers can
earn $750/ week! No
CDL? Roehl can help
you get t rai ned!
1-888-528-7112.
COMPANY DRIVERS &
Owner Operators
Wanted! No touch
freight, 90% drop &
hook, dedicated op-
portunities available.
Call 888-710-8707
Also seeking Recent
Grads. Call Lavonna
877-440-7890 Apply
online: www.drivefor
pamtransport.com
DENTAL ASST NEEDED
Please call
Dr. Fusilier’s office @
922-6700 or fax resume
to 501-922-6357
EVENING Janitorial
Position. No Exp
Needed, Ref. Req.,
Must be able to pass
Drug Test & Back-
ground Check. Call
Mon-Fri, 8a-5p
501-617-4567
EXPERIENCED COOK
/ WAITSTAFF
CALL HOME PLATE
DINER ASK FOR
RICK 813-4423
TECHNOLOGY SALES
Associates needed.
Part-time. Flexible
hours. Apply in per-
son: Office Depot.
1621 Military Rd.
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Employment
MIG WELDERS
Must have a minimum
2 years MIG welding
experience with refer-
ences and be able to
pass a welding test.
Pay package i n-
cludes: competitive
starting wage, 401-K,
health & dental insur-
ance, paid vacation.
Apply in person at
DLM, 10912 Highway
270 East, Malvern.
Take exit 99 off I-30
right to our door. DLM
is an EOE.
Animal Services
Manager
The City of Benton is
currently taking appli-
cations for Manager
of the Animal Control
Department. Job
function is to plan, co-
ordinate and manage
animal control serv-
ices and operations of
the City. Employee
must possess a valid
Arkansas driver's li-
cense. Interested
persons may obtain
an application and a
complete job descrip-
tion at City Hall, 114
S. East Street, Ben-
ton, AR, Monday
through Friday,
between the hours of
8:00 A.M. and 5:00
P.M. or by visiting
the City of Benton
website at
www.bentonar.org
Consideration will
begin after 5:00 P.M.,
Wednesday, January
22, 2014. EQUAL OP-
PORTUNITY EMPLOYER
Employment
WATER TREATMENT
OPERATOR II
Benton Utilities is tak-
ing applications. Job
function is to assist in
the operation and
maintenance of the
water plant facilities,
equipment, buildings,
and grounds. Appli-
cants should have a
basic knowledge of
regulations regarding
water quality, work-
pl ace safety and
ADEQ training; ability
to wear a respirator
and SCBA. Require-
ments are the ability
to obtain Arkansas
Water Treatment and
Distribution License.
Employment applica-
tion and complete job
description are avail-
able at Benton Mu-
nicipal Complex, 114
S. East Street, Ben-
ton, AR, Monday
through Friday, be-
tween the hours of
8:00 A.M. and 5:00
P.M. or from the City
of Benton website at
www.bentonar.org .
Consideration will be-
gin on January 24,
2014. Salary DOE.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY
EMPLOYER
TRUCK SALESPERSON
MHC Kenworth in LR,
We offer the BEST
benefits, BEST com-
pensation and BEST
training. Apply online
www.mhctruck.com/jobs
or send resume to
kevin.tackett@mhctru
ck.com
Classifieds Work!
Instruction
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
Operator Training!.
Bul l dozers, Back-
hoes, Excavators.
Lifetime Job Place-
ment 3 Week Hands
On Program, Local
Job Placement Assis-
tance. National Certi-
fications. GI Bill Bene-
f i t s El i gi bl e!
1-866-362-6497.
HIGH SCHOOL DI-
PLOMA FROM
HOME. 6 - 8 weeks.
ACCREDITED Get a
Diploma. Get A Job!
No Computer Needed
FREE Br ochur e.
1-800-264-8330. Ben-
jamin Franklin High
School
www.diplomafromhome.com
MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED!
Become a Medical
Office Assistant now!
Online job training
gets you ready. Job
placement when pro-
gram completed. Call
ACC for details! HS
Diploma/GED
Needed.
1-888-734-6717
Child Care
CHILDCARE
Infants to 5 B •L• S
Vouchers
562-0691 • 951-2923
6:30a -5:30p
IN-HOME DAYCARE
Spotless - Non-smoking
Drop-ins Welcome!
778-2920
Services
DISH TV Retailer
- SAVE! St ar t i ng
$19.99/month (for 12
months.) FREE Pre-
mium Movie Chan-
nels. FREE Equip-
ment, Installation &
Act i vat i on. CALL,
COMPARE LOCAL
DEALS!
1-800-278-8081
DISH TV Retailer.
Starting $19.99/month
(for 12 mos.) Broad-
band Internet starting
$14.95/month (where
available.) Ask About
SAME DAY Installa-
ti on! CALL Now!
1-800-593-2572
EXP. CAREGIVER
with exc. references.
Will cook, clean, run
errands. Call
501-860-1624
REDUCE YOUR CA-
BLE BILL! Get a
whole-home Satellite
system installed at
NO COST and pro-
gramming starting at
$19.99/mo. FREE
HD/DVR Upgrade to
new callers. CALL
NOW 1-800-474-0423
Apartments
Unfurnished
2 BR Apts, kit. appl.,
W&D conn., $500 &
up. Handicap access.
317-5190 / 317-5192
2BR 1BA Newl y
Renovated 407A N.
Fourth St Benton
$525mo $250dep. No
Pets Call 315-0674
BRYANT - Nice
Townhome. 3 BR, 2
BA, 1300 sq. ft., $695
mo., 501-847-5377
MOVE IN NOW!
1 & 2 BR Apts & Houses
Super clean & well main-
tained Move in by 2-14
& receive 1/2 mo. Free
rent. Must Qualify.
New applicants only!
Castle Properties
Call Connie
501-626-4596
Let the
Courier Classifieds
work for you.
Call Cathy or Kim
to place your
Classified Ad.
Mon.-Fri. 8am-5pm
315-8228
or come by
321 N. Market St.
Looking for a good
deal? Search the
Courier Classifieds!!
Apartments
Unfurnished
CAMRY COURT
in Bryant
501-804-0125
is Proud to announce
Newly open sister prop-
erty in Hot Springs
FORREST HILLS
APARTMENTS
201 South Rodgers Rd
1, 2 & 3 bedrooms
24/7 state of the art fit-
ness center, Pool, Play-
ground, fishing pond.
Private balconies
CONTACT: Savannah
OFFICE: 501-767-2626
After hours cell:
501-545-8563
Email:  forresthillsa
partments@yahoo.com
Visit our web-sites
www.arkansas
apartments.net
OR
www.apartmentguide
.com
NOTICE: All real es-
tate advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to the Fair Housing
Act which makes it il-
legal to advertise any
preference, limitation
or di scr i mi nat i on
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or in-
tention to make any
such preference. We
will not knowingly ac-
cept any advertising
for real estate which
is in violation of the
law. All persons are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis.
Houses for Rent
1103 B ALCOA
(DUPLEX) 3BR
No Pets, $625mo
$625dep
501-860-5073
3 & 4 BEDROOM
$825 -$1400 mo.,
Haskell, Benton &
Bryant. 315-9370
3 BR 1 BA carport,
stove, dishwasher, re-
fri g. new carpet.
CH/A, fenced yard, no
pets, good location,
$650mo+$400dep.
Please call 562-0691
or 951-2919
3 BR 2 BA, 2 car garage,
4 yrs. old, $1050.mo. No
Ho u s i n g Ac c e p t e d
607-3229 or 414-6430
3 BR, 1 ba , CH/A,
kitchen appli.$675 mo
+ $500 dep. 1502
Sorrell. 612-8848
3 BR, 2 BA, 2 car ga-
rage, 1800 sq. ft., Val-
ley Crest Subdv.,
$1150 mo., $800 dep.
501-840-1278
Classifieds Work!
Houses for Rent
519 PEARSON 2Br
1BA $575mo + $375
Dep. No Pet s
326-3907
BRYANT: 111 Short
St., 3 BR, 2 BA. $650
mo., $ 650 dep., 1 yr
lease. No cats/dogs.
Scott 501-580-7190
Eagle Properties
LLC
315–2075
Nice 2 & 3 BR Homes
from $500 to $925
Apartments
1 BR’s from $415
2 BR’s from $475
*based on availability
Deposit & References
Required
eaglepropsaline.com
FOR LEASE/SALE
New 3 & 4 BR, 2 BA,
brick, FP, ceiling fans,
carpet, 2 car garage,
patio. Go to: www.
catalyst-residential.com
or 501-697-6342
FOR RENT 4Br 2Ba
Sardis Rd. $875mo
plus dep. Please call
944-9476
FOR RENT or Lease
to Buy Brand New
1600 sq. ft 3Br 2Ba
will finance in Mars
Hi l l l Area on a
cul-de-sac $1113mo
Please call 944-4976
HOUSE FOR RENT
(Bryant) 2000 Sq. Ft.
2 Story $900mo.
$900dep. Near
Interstate Call
860-0279
NEW 4BR 2BA
Fenced yard Vaulted
Ceilings 1800sq.ft.
$1150mo - $1250mo
Bent on School s
Please call 326-8000
Mobile Homes
For Rent
2BR 1BA STOVE
REFRIG NO PETS
317-6426 778-1993
Firewood
PREMIUM
FIREWOOD
Green/Seasoned Mix
Pick up or Delivery
840-1436
Musical
Merchandise
Cushing
Piano Service
Tune • Repair
Player Pianos & Pump Organs
778-6584
Pets & Supplies
BENTON ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
501-776-5972
benton.petfinder.com
Pets & Supplies
BRYANT ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
www.bryant.petfinder.com
www.1-800-save-a-pet.com
www.1888pets911.org
Hay For Sale
HAY FOR SALE
Round Bales
Net Wrapped. Call
501-317-1365
HAY
FOR SALE
Mixed grass clean.
Fertilized. 4X5 net
wrapped. In the field
cutting now.
$
35.00 loaded
1 to 400 bales
available
Buy as many as you
need. Great horse hay.
501-840-1529 or
501-860-8080
Sport Utility
Vehicles
JEEP WRANGLER
1989 automatic
71,357 miles $1890
662-336-1039.
Autos Wanted
C A $ H F O R
CARS/TRUCKS: Get
A Top Dollar IN-
STANT Offer! Run-
ning or Not. Dam-
aged? Wrecked? OK!
We Pay Up To
$20,000! Call Toll
Free: 1-800-871-9712
Houses For Sale
HOUSES & LAND for
Sale in Benton/Saline
County Call Adm. of
Estate 501-838-2874
Mobile Homes
For Sale
RENT TO OWN
'94 16x64 2br $530
'95 16x72 2br $560
'99 16x80 3br $580
'00 16x80 4br $590
Lake • Fish • Walk Trail
Sunset Lake • 951-2842
Legal Notices
PUBLIC HEARING
The Bauxite School
District will be pre-
senting the 2014 Six
Year Master Plan
that will be submitted
to the Division of the
Public School Aca-
demic Facilities and
Transportation; for
public viewing on
January 27, 2014.
All comments to be
presented in para-
graph form to the
board. Locat i on:
Bauxi t e Mi ddl e
School Professional
Development Room
Time: 6:00 p.m.
Classifieds - a
shopping center
delivered to your home
CLASSIFIEDS
Friday, January 3, 2014
class@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page 9
Moderately Confused Herman
Crossword Challenge
Kit ‘n’ Carlyle
Celebrity Cipher
Here’s How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken
down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the
numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and
box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out the order in which
the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues
already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you
name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!
Astro•graph
BERNICE BEDE OSOL
www.bernice4u.com.
Alley Oop
Big Nate
Born Loser
Thatababy
Frank and Ernest
Grizzwells
Monty
Arlo and Janis
Soup to Nutz
MONDAY, JANUARY 20, 2014
You may be inclined to spread
yourself too thin this year. Instead,
focus on your strengths and stay
within the realm of possibility.
Avoiding impulsivity and taking
thoughtful and cautious steps for-
ward will be the key. Think before
you act.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) --
You will have all sorts of lucrative
opportunities today, but the possi-
bility of choosing the wrong deal is
apparent. Don’t think that bigger is
better. Take the most conservative
option.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- Don’t worry about ongoing
concerns. You would be better off
communicating about what needs
to happen to allow an important
relationship to thrive. Take on a
personal challenge.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- Much can be achieved today,
especially regarding job prospects.
An interview or chat with someone
who has the power to place you in
a better position will prove fortu-
itous.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- Love and romance will likely be
on your mind today. Decide what
you really want, and make a move.
Creative projects should not be
neglected. Aesthetic changes will
work out favorably.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
-- Restlessness will be your enemy
today. Don’t make adjustments that
are unlikely to improve matters.
Real estate and investment oppor-
tunities are present, but you need
to be realistic about your finances.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) --
It’s time to clear up any misconcep-
tions about who you are and what
you want to do. If you share your
plans, you will find the support and
encouragement you need.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Business
matters should be your focus today.
Search for a new position or a pro-
motion at your current job. Expand
your knowledge, your network and
your future prospects.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- You
won’t have a hard time being practi-
cal today. Proceed cautiously. You
may want to reflect carefully on your
work as well as your personal affairs.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Make
an effort to iron out matters that
involve the government, banks or
other institutions. Talk to an adviser
about your finances. Home improve-
ment plans can begin today.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) --
Partnerships that will help you carry
out your plans can be established.
Opportunities to make new friends
are evident. Love is likely on your
mind.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- You may find yourself caught
in an emotional quagmire. You may
prefer to avoid personal confron-
tations, but it’s wise to face your
dilemma. Let go of the past and move
on.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- Your insightfulness and ability to
offer excellent solutions will land you
in the spotlight at any group func-
tion you attend. Communication and
travel will be the primary concerns of
your day.
Monday, January 20, 2014
news@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier Page 9
COMICS
10 The Saline Courier
Monday, January 20, 2014
‘Freezin’ for a Reason’ ... without a doubt
BRENT DAVIS / The Saline Courier
ABOVE: Stephanie Dillavou, center, walks with her sons, Samuel Krallman, left, and
Clayton Dillavou, right, during the costume judging constest. Dillavou and her sons were
sponsored by McCauley Services in Benton. LEFT: A dog is reluctant to strut his stuff
during the constume contest. The dog did not plunge into the lake with the group.
On Saturday, the Benton Police
Department held its annual fund-
raiser for Special Olympics. The
event, known as the Polar Plunge,
was held at Hurricane Lake in
Benton.
Individuals, businesses and
other organizations participated by
collecting money and sponsoring
teams that jumped into the cold
water of the lake. The temperature
at the time of the event was in the
low 40s with winds gusting upwards
of 10 mph.
Approximately $15,000 was raised
for Special Olympics. A contest was
conducted for best costumes by a
group, best individual costume and
an award was given for the group
that raised the most money.
A group from the Bryant School
District won the best group cos-
tume prize for its “Grapes on a
Vine” design. Tamra Gore won best
individual costume for her rendi-
tion of Abraham Lincoln. A group of
Benton Police Department officers,
each dressed in a suit, tie and mask
representing several presidents of
the United States, raised the most
money as a group. Lt. Kevin Russell
collected the most donations by an
individual.
“We had another great year due
to all the great citizens of Saline
County who donated their time and
money to make this happen. We
couldn’t be more proud to help out
a group like Special Olympics of
Arkansas.”
By Brent Davis
bdavis@bentoncourier.com
BRENT DAVIS / The Saline Courier
A team sponsored by the Benton Police Department, dubbed ‘The Justice League’ dressed as U.S. presidents, is joined by Rep. Ann Clemmer as they enter the lake water.
BRENT DAVIS / The Saline Courier
Members of the Benton MYAC, joined by Chick-fil-A owner Guy Parker, second from the left, express surprise as they run into the cold
water.
BRENT DAVIS / The Saline Courier
The winner of the prize for Best Group Costume was awarded to a team from the Bryant School District for its “Grapes on a Vine” design.
BRENT DAVIS / The Saline Courier
The shock of entering cold water on a windy day is evident on the faces of two women as they plunge.
BRENT DAVIS / The Saline Courier
ABOVE: Misty Bedsole, left, and her son Michael Joe, 4, enjoy a
moment with the mascot from Chick-fil-A, a sponsor of the Polar
Plunge.
BELOW: The team from Civitan Services Inc., hits the water and
appears to enjoy their jump.
This document is © 2014 by editor - all rights reserved.
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