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E-edition October 12, 2013

October 12, 2013

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Courier
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Volume 136
Number 284
1 Section 16 Pages
50¢
Home of Ted Newman
and Robert Wood
The Saline
INDEX
OBITUARIES .............................. 3
EDITORIAL ................................. 4
SPORTS .................................. 5,6
OLD FASHIONED DAY ............ 8,9
CHURCH ............................. 10,11
www. bent oncouri er. com
Saturday, October 12, 2013
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Get in a workout.
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SCRAPBOOK
Firefighters run drills
Classic performance planned
Beavers tame Lions, 50-0
PAGE 2
PAGE 7
PAGE 5
Saline County’S newS SourCe SinCe 1876
Vigil marks domestic violence awareness
CROWING ACHIEVEMENT
GEORGE COBB/Special to The Saline Courier
Bauxite senior Amy Etheridge is crowned Homecoming Queen on Friday night by senior football player Brady
Thompson. The Miners fell in a dog fight to Pulaski Robinson, 47-40, at “The Pit”.
Seventeen women and children in Arkansas
have lost their lives as a result of domestic vio-
lence thus far in 2013. They are being remem-
bered especially during October, which is
Domestic Violence Awareness Month.
As part of the observance, Saline County Safe
Haven will conduct a candlelight vigil at the gaze-
bo of the Saline County Courthouse. The event is
scheduled for 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 15.
Safe Haven is an organization that provides
shelter to victims of domestic abuse in the
county.
The vigil marks the start of a series of events
planned by the group as part of Domestic
Violence Month.
Beginning at 11 a.m. that day, the Clothesline
Project and the Silent Witness Project will be
open for viewing. The Clothesline Project will dis-
play 500 T-shirts representing victims of domestic
violence.
Families of victims of this crime are given
white shirts and are asked to decorate them in
memory of their loved ones.
The Silent Witness Project will display life-size
wooden figures to commemorate the women
whose lives were lost in 2012 as a result of
domestic abuse. Attached to the back of each
wooden figure is the story of a victim.
Lajuan Legate, a domestic abuse survivor and
founder of Women’s Own Worth, will share her
story. Legate suffered physical abuse and eventu-
ally shot her abuser.
“The Clothesline Project is a powerful display
of the deadly reality of violence against women.
More than three women die per day in the
United States as a result of domestic abuse,” said
Collette Collatt of Safe Haven.
She noted that the shelter provides support
services for their clients, including group meet-
ings on Thursday, which help victims with orders
of protection and basic day-to-day life activities.
“Many of the women we serve have been so
beaten down that their parenting skills have suf-
fered. Other times we have to teach these victims
how to take care of themselves again,” she said.
At present the shelter is housing 10 people
to protect them. Safe Haven does not reveal the
location of its facility in order to provide security
for the women and children who need this assis-
tance.
The events during Domestic Violence Week
are open to the public and residents are encour-
aged to attend. Contribution boxes will be located
on the lawn for donations of paper products, laun-
dry detergents, cleaning supplies and basic items
needed to keep a home running smoothly.
Saline County Safe Haven Inc. is a non-profit
organization. Individuals in need of services from
the facility may call the crisis line at 501-315-
SAFE (7233).
SALINE COUNTY
WEATHER FORECAST
SATURDAY: Sunny with highs
in the lower 80s.
SATURDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
lower 60s.
SUNDAY: Cloudy with highs in
the lower 80s.
SUNDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
upper 60s.
MONDAY: Chance of rain with
highs in the lower 70s.
MONDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
lower 60s.
TUESDAY: Mostly sunny with
highs in the lower 80s.
Benton Panther Softball
has scheduled a special
event for Saturday, Oct.
26.
“Just Kickin’ It!” is a
kickball tournament that
will follow the completion
of the ACT tests at Benton
High School.
Students are encour-
aged to get their co-ed
teams together for a fun
day of kickball to benefit
the Benton High School
softball teams. Divisions
have been planned for
middle school, junior high
and adults.
Also planned is a best
team costume contest that
will offer prizes.
‘Be creative,” organiz-
ers encouraged.
Registration packets
are available at the Sports
Shop and at the offices
of Benton High School,
Benton Middle School
and Benton Junior High.
Registration is due back
to one of these locations
no later than Oct. 18.
Benton High School will be celebrating
homecoming Friday, Oct. 25, with a football
clash against the Lake Hamilton Wolves at
the Benton Sports Complex, but related fes-
tivities will precede the game.
In keeping with tradition, the school will
hold a homecoming parade, but this year’s
parade will take a different route from previ-
ous years. The parade is set to begin at 5:30
p.m.
Kali Hardig, who has been recovering
from a life-threatening, brain-eating disease,
will serve as grand marshal for the event,
according to organizer Christy Fleeman.
Fleeman noted that a new stadium neces-
sitated a new parade route. She noted that
the current plan calls for staging on the
Benton High School Arena parking lot.
“We’ll be pulling out of the arena park-
ing lot and taking a left onto Border Street,
then turning left onto Hoover Street in front
of Angie Grant Elementary School,” she
said.
The procession then will cross over Cox
Street and enter the sports complex via
the Algood Street entrance and then travel
through the complex to the end at the
main gate on the Benton Parkway side, she
added.
Fleeman said floats will be required to
exit the complex via Benton Parkway and
travel back to the arena for drop-off.
Entry forms will be available in all school
offices beginning Wednesday, Oct. 16, and
are due back no later than Wednesday, Oct.
23.
Judges will be provided and a trophy will
be presented to the float winner, Fleeman
said.
Allyson Reynolds has been named home-
coming queen and will be featured along
with other members of the homecoming
court.
Several school organizations are expect-
ed to participate in the parade.
Co-ed kickball
tourney to benefit
softball program
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
Homecoming parade route
changes due to new stadium
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Nearly 1,600
state employees whose positions are paid
for with federal funds will be furloughed
next week if the government shutdown
continues, Arkansas finance officials said
Friday.
The Department of Finance and
Administration estimated that 1,594 state
workers will be idled starting Monday
because of the federal shutdown that began
Oct. 1. The number rose from the 1,460 fur-
loughs Gov. Mike Beebe said he expected
earlier Friday, and state officials said the
figure could change as the department con-
tinued reviewing requests from agencies to
keep workers on the job.
"They're still talking to state agencies,
they've still got agencies coming to them
who think they might have found some
other places to get money from to keep
people on a little longer, so that number
could still flux," Beebe spokesman Matt
DeCample said.
DeCample said other employees' hours
may be cut or they may have to work with-
out being paid during the shutdown.
The state has furloughed hundreds of
workers since the shutdown started Oct. 1.
Beebe told agency directors on Wednesday
that the state no longer had the resources
to cover for the lack of federal funds for the
positions and programs.
Richard Weiss, director of the Arkansas
Department of Finance and Administration
said his department was reviewing each
agency's federal grants to see if leftover
money from previous years could be used to
pay for the positions. Weiss said the number
could change as those reviews continue.
Officials expect
1,600 furloughs
Associated Press
By Brent Davis
bdavis@bentoncourier.com
2 The Saline Courier
Saturday, October 12, 2013
JJ’s Restaurant
Sunday, October 13, 2013....Only
$
11.99
Sunday Buffet 11:00 am to 7:30 pm
Meats
Hickory smoked Ribs
southern Fried Chicken
Meatloaf
Grilled Hamburger steaks
w/Homemade Gravy
Hickory smoked Chicken
VeGetables
Corn on the Cob
Candied Yams
Green beans w/New
Potatoes
steamed Cabbage
Pinto beans w/Ham
VeGetables continued
Homemade Mashed
Potatoes & Gravy
seasoned turnip Greens
Fried Okra
baked beans
FResH HOMeMade salads
deviled eggs
Waldorf Fruit salad
Marinated tomatoes &
Cucumbers
Cole slaw
Potato salad
Fresh Garden Green salad
HOMeMade desseRts
Pineapple Upside-down
Cake
Peach Pound Cake
Chocolate Walnut brownies
Homemade banana Pudding
Hot Peach & apple Cobblers
Homemade sugar Free
desserts
bRead
Hot Yeast Rolls
Homemade Cornbread
JJ's Restaurant
“We remember what Mama’s Cooking was like.”
I-30 EXIT 106 • BENTON • 501-778-2295
ReseRvations available
501-778-2295 salinecountylibrary.org
BOSWELL LIBRARY - BRYANT
201 Prickett Road
M W F-9-5:30; T Th-9-8; Sat-9-4
501-847-2166
HERZFELD LIBRARY - BENTON
1800 Smithers Drive
M W Th-9-8; T F-9-5:30; Sat-9-4
501-778-4766
HALLOWEEN
COSTUME CLOSET
The Saline County Library
Halloween Costume Closet will
open at 9 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 5
at both library locations.
Costumes are available for checkout in a variety of
children’s sizes through Halloween or while supplies
last. Call 778-4766 or 847-2166 for more information.
Visit Our Website
www.jeffselfpoolsandspas.com
•Above ground pools
•Inground pools
•lIners
•repAIr & servIce
•chemIcAls
•pArts
•sAles
Jeff Self
pools & spas
(501)847-6990
phone
(501)847-8816
FAx
Antiques & Collectibles
22430 I-30 • Exit 123
Bryant • 847-7117
Open 7 Days a Week
SALINE COURIER SCRAPBOOK 1987
Courier Photo
Using only their sense of touch, Benton firefighters Lanny Lovell, left, and Richard Childress “res-
cue” a dummy from a house next to the Central Fire Station on Tuesday.
SALINE COUNTY EVENTS
Email calendar items to news@bentoncourier.com or call 501-315-8228 ext. 236.
Calendar items are intended for nonprofit organizations.
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13
RURAL DALE SCHOOL
REUNION: 1 p.m., Sunday,
October 13, 2013 at Ten Mile
Baptist Church on Hwy. 70.
Lunch will be served at $12.
per person. If you have ever
attended or taught, please
join us at the reunion.
28TH ANNUAL SALINE
COUNTY HUNGER HIKE will
be Sunday, Oct. 13 at 2 p.m.
Registration for the hike will
begin at 1:30 p.m. The hike
will start and end at First
United Methodist Church and
will take place rain or shine.
Proceeds benefit Churches
Joint Council on Human
Needs. Call Anne Carpenter
at 501-315-0599 for more
information.
MONDAY, OCTOBER 14
DR. WENDY RICHER, head of
archives at Ouachita Baptist
University in Arkadelphia and
former Arkansas state histo-
rian, will present a program
on Arkansas Baptist records
housed at Ouachita Baptist
University on Monday, Oct.
14 at 6:30 p.m. The program
will be held at Herzfeld
Library, 1800 Smithers Drive
in Benton. Call 778-4766 for
more information.
SALEM FIRE DISTRICT BOARD
of Commissioners will meet
on Monday, Oct. 14 at 7 p.m.
at Station No. 1 located at
1785 Salem Road.
TEEN READ WEEK 2013:
Ages 13-18 are invited to
celebrate Teen Read Week
2013: Seek the Unknown at
both Saline County Library
locations Oct. 14-19. The
Saline County Library will cel-
ebrate with several individual
activities and a month-long
1-Sentence Horror Story
Writing Contest. Applications
can be picked up at either
library location (children’s
or teen desk) beginning Oct.
1 and must be turned in by
Oct. 31. Top three entries will
receive a prize. Call 778-4766
or 847-2166 for more infor-
mation.
BENTON BOOK CLUB: The
Benton Book Club will meet
at 5 p.m. Monday, Oct. 14 at
Herzfeld Library to discuss
its chosen title. The group is
open to adults 18 and older.
Call 778-4766 for more infor-
mation.
TEEN READ WEEK CUPCAKE
PARTY: Ages 13-18 are invit-
ed to stop by and decorate
a cupcake-or two at the Out
of this World Cupcake Party
at 4 p.m. Monday, Oct. 14 at
Herzfeld Library and at 4 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 15 at Boswell
Library. Learn how to make
your cupcake into one eyed
aliens and spaceships and
much more. The program is
part of Teen Read Week 2013
activities. Call 778-4766 or
847-2166 for more informa-
tion.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15
PUPPET SHOW: All ages are
invited to a family-friendly
puppet show at 4 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 15 at Herzfeld
Library. Call 778-4766 for
more information.
SALINE CROSSING REGIONAL
PARK & RECREATION AREA,
INC. will meet at 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 15 in the Gene
Moss building at Tyndall
Park. The public is welcome
and urged to join as the plan
for the 200th anniversary of
the first pioneer settlement
(Saline Crossing - circa 1815)
of Saline County is presented
and help Save Our Bridge -
The Old River Bridge.
WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 16
BLOCK PARTY: LIBRARY LEGO
CLUB: Ages 4-14 are invited
to create a Lego masterpiece
from 3:30-5 p.m. Wednesday,
Oct. 16 at Boswell Library
during the monthly Block
Party. A new theme is
explored each month. Call
847-2166 for more informa-
tion.
 
INTRODUCTION INTO
COMPUTERS: Ages 18 and
older are invited to attend an
introductory computer class
at 1 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 16
at Boswell Library. This class
includes information such as
learning to use a mouse and
keyboard. No registration
required. Call 778-4766 for
more information.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17
TEEN READ WEEK SCI-FI
MOVIE EXTRAVAGANZA:
Ages 13-18 are invited to
watch a sci-fi movie as part
of Teen Read Week: Seek the
Unknown activities Thursday,
Oct. 17 at both Saline County
Library locations. The movie
starts at 3:30 p.m. at Boswell
Library and at 4 p.m. at
Herzfeld Library. Call 778-
4766 or 847-2166 for more
information.
INTRODUCTION TO THE
INTERNET: Ages 18 and older
are invited to attend a basic
computer class regarding
use of the internet at 1 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 17 at Boswell
Library. No registration
required. Call 778-4766 for
more information.
 
GENEOLOGY/LOCAL HISTORY
HELPSteve Perdue, head of
genealogy/local history at
the Saline County Library, will
be available to answer your
genealogy questions from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday,
Oct. 17 at Boswell Library
in Bryant. Call 778-4766 to
make an appointment.
SHARON EXTENSION
HOMEMAKERS Club will meet
10:00 a.m. October 17 at the
home of Sylvia Nalley, 6902
Highway 5, Benton. 
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18
5TH ANNUAL BOO BASH:
Ascent Children’s Health
Services is presenting the
5th Annual Boo Bash on
Oct. 18 at 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Free food, door prized, jump
castles, games and more
will be some of the activities
available. Wear costumes.
The public is encouraged
to come. The event will be
located at 3214 Winchester
Dr. in Benton. For more infor-
mation call 501-326-6160.
MOVIE IN THE PARK: “Hotel
Transylvania” will be
shown at the Tyndall Park
Amphitheatre on Friday, Oct.
18 and will begin at 8 p.m.
Admission is free.
MONDAY, OCTOBER 21
GAME ON!: Tweens and teens
are invited to play video and/
or board games from 3:30-
5 p.m. Monday, Oct. 21 at
both Saline County Library
locations. The program is for
ages 8-18 at Boswell Library
and ages 13-18 at Herzfeld
Library. Call 778-4766 or 847-
2166 for more information.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22
CREATIVE OUTLET: Teens
are invited to participate in
a book club and make-and-
take craft from 4-5:15 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 22 at Boswell
Library in Bryant. Call 847-
2166 for more information.
WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 23
BENTON LITERARY GUILD
opened the fall session
Wednesday, Sept. 25.  The
meeting was held at the
home of Bonnie Hoffman. 
The book review program
was given by Carolyn
Moore. She reviewed the
book “The Paris Wife” by
Paula McClain. This is a story
of ambition and betrayal,
“The Paris Wife” captures the
love story
between two unforgettable
people: Ernest Hemingway
and his wife Hadley. The
October meeting of the Guild
will be Wednesday, Oct. 23
at the home of Mary Jean
Busken.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24
ARKANSAS HISTORIC
PRESERVATION COMMISSION
will present a program on
Arkansas’ historic haunted
sites at Boswell Library in
Bryant on Thursday, Oct. 24
at 6:30 p.m. For more infor-
mation call 847-2166.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25
BENTON HIGH SCHOOL Class
of 1958 reunion is set for
Friday and Saturday, Oct.
25-26 at the Benton Panther
Homecoming game on the
Benton Athletic Complex at
7 p.m. Saturday’s event will
be at Benton High School to
tour the new building begin-
ning at 12:15 p.m. Dinner will
be available for purchase for
$12.
ARKANSAS HISTORIC
Preservation Commission
will present a program on
Arkansas’ Historic Haunted
Sites at the Bob Herzfeld
Memorial Library, 1800
Smithers Drive in Benton on
Monday, Oct. 25 at 6:30 p.m.
Call 778-4766 for more infor-
mation.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26
ALL YOU CAN EAT FISH FRY:
3 to 7 p.m. Saturday, October
26, at Congo Masonic Lodge.
Corner of Steel Bridge and
Thompson Dairy Road.
American raised catfish,
homemade hushpuppies,
beans with ham, river bank
fried taters and more. $12 for
adults, $5 for children 9 to
12, 8 and under free. Money
raised goes to area charities.
Public invited.
THEOS, A SUPPORT
GROUP FOR WIDOWS AND
WIDOWERS will meet for
lunch at 11:30 a.m. on
Saturday, Oct. 26 at Riverside
Grocery.
SPOOK CITY will be held
in Downtown Benton on
Saturday, Oct. 26 from 5 - 8
p.m. Admission is free to the
public. Spook City wristbands
can be purchased in advance
at Books & Baubles or
Paradise Pets or at the event
the day of for $5. For more
information call 501-315-
0450 or 501-317-9199.
MONDAY, OCTOBER 28
ARKANSAS HISTORIC
PRESERVATION COMMISSION
will present a program on
Arkansas’ historic haunted
sites at Herzfeld Library in
Benton on Monday, Oct. 28
at 6:30 p.m. For more infor-
mation call 847-2166.
MONDAY, OCTOBER 28
AND
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29
BENTON JUNIOR VOLLEYBALL
TRYOUTS will be held
on Monday, Oct. 28 and
Tuesday, Oct. 29 at 6 p.m. at
Fitness Unlimited in Benton.
To register for tryouts visit
www.bentonjuniorsvolley-
ball.com or email at benton-
LITTLE ROCK — A
Democratic group is airing
a television ad in Arkansas
criticizing Republican Senate
hopeful and U.S. Rep. Tom
Cotton over the federal gov-
ernment shutdown.
Senate Majority PAC on
Friday announced that it was
spending about $100,000 to
air the 30-second spot on
Little Rock television over
the next month. It's the
second ad the group has
aired targeting Cotton, who
announced in August he was
challenging Democratic Sen.
Mark Pryor next year.
The ad calls Cotton reck-
less for supporting the
push to tie spending bills to
defunding the federal health
care law, a move that has
resulted in the standoff that's
shut down the federal gov-
ernment.
PAC launches
ad criticizing
Tom Cotton
Associated Press
LITTLE ROCK — A
company that specializes in
using data to personalize
offers and promotions for
customers through their
mobile devices and other
technology announced
Friday it is expanding into
Arkansas with a new facility
that will hire more than 35
people.
NGage Labs announced
that it planned to begin
hiring immediately for its
"analytics innovation cen-
ter," which will be located
in downtown Little Rock's
River Market District. State
officials said the average
salary for the jobs with the
Arizona-based firm will be
more than $100,000.
"When we have an oppor-
tunity to announce jobs that
are tomorrow's jobs based
upon really high levels of
skill and education, that
creates a different kind of
buzz, and that's what we're
here to announce today,"
Gov. Mike Beebe said at a
news conference at the state
Capitol.
Rod Ford, nGage's chief
executive officer, said the
center will work on deliver-
ing "personalized digital
experiences" for customers
of retailers, restaurants,
campuses and sporting
events. For example, he
said, retailers can use the
technology to target shop-
pers through their cell-
phones with offers based on
customers' shopping habits
or past purchases at a store.
The Arkansas Economic
Development Commission
said the company is receiv-
ing $1.05 million from a
state incentive fund to
go toward infrastructure,
equipment, training and
recruitment for the center.
Company to open in LR
Associated Press
Saturday, October 12, 2013
The Saline Courier 3
517 Bird St., Benton
501-315-7213
www.northsidepower.com
Sales • Installation • Service • Maintenance
Since 1978 501-778-3717
115 E. Cross Street in Benton
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Tuxedo Rental
Flowers for
All Occasions
Your Wedding
Headquarters
Shutters • Blinds • Shades
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Lincoln Square, Ste. 9
2202 Military Rd.
315-7728
INC.
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(501) 315-6497 Benton, AR 72015
4013 Springhill Rd., Bryant
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501-847-6888
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PAID OBITUARIES
OBITUARIES
BISMARCK — A North
Dakota farmer who discov-
ered an oil spill the size of
seven football fields while
out harvesting wheat says
that when he found it, crude
was bubbling up out of the
ground.
Farmer Steve Jensen says
he smelled the crude for
days before the tires on his
combines were coated in it.
At the apparent break in the
Tesoro Corp.'s underground
pipeline, the oil was "spew-
ing and bubbling 6 inches
high," he said in a telephone
interview Thursday.
What Jensen had found
on Sept. 29 turned out it
was one of the largest spills
recorded in the state. At
20,600 barrels it was four
times the size of a pipeline
rupture in late March that
forced the evacuation of
more than 20 homes in
Arkansas.
But it was 12 days after
Jensen reported the spill
before state officials told the
public what had happened,
raising questions about how
North Dakota, which is in
the midst of an oil boom,
reports such incidents.
The spill happened in a
remote area in the north-
west corner of the state. The
nearest home is a half-mile
away, and Tesoro says no
water sources were contami-
nated, no wildlife was hurt
and no one was injured.
The release of oil has
been stopped, state environ-
ment geologist Kris Roberts
said Thursday. And the spill
— spread out over 7.3 acres,
or about the size of seven
football fields, — has been
contained.
Jacob Wiedmer, who was
helping Jensen harvest his
wheat crop, likened the Sept.
29 discovery to the theme
song from "The Beverly
Hillbillies" television show.
"It was just like Jed
Clampett shooting at some
food ..." he said of the oil
coming from the ground.
"Except we weren't hunting,
we were harvesting."
Gov. Jack Dalrymple, who
says he wasn't even told
about what happened until
Wednesday night, said the
state is now investigating
its procedures for reporting
spills.
"There are many ques-
tions to be answered on
how it occurred and how it
was detected and if there
was anything that could
have been done that could
have made a difference,"
Dalrymple said Thursday,
when questioned at a news
conference on a separate
topic.
"Initially, it was felt that
the spill was not overly
large," Dalrymple said.
"When they realized it was
a fairly sizable spill, they
began to contact more peo-
ple about it."
Jensen said he had har-
vested most of his wheat
before the spill, but the land
is no longer usable for plant-
ing.
"We expect not to be able
to farm that ground for sev-
eral years," he said.
Tesoro Logistics, a sub-
sidiary of the San Antonio,
Texas-based company that
owns and operates parts of
Tesoro's oil infrastructure,
said in a statement that the
affected portion of the pipe-
line has been shut down.
"Protection and care of
the environment are funda-
mental to our core values,
and we deeply regret any
impact to the landowner,"
Tesoro CEO Greg Goff said
in a statement. "We will con-
tinue to work tirelessly to
fully remediate the release
area."
Wayde Schafer, a North
Dakota spokesman for the
Sierra Club, said the spill
is an example of the lack of
oversight in a state that has
exploded with oil develop-
ment in recent years.
"We need more inspectors
and more transparency,"
Schafer said. "Not only is
the public not informed, but
agencies don't appear to be
aware of what's going on
and that's not good."
Eric Haugstad, Tesoro's
director of contingency
planning and emergency
response, said the hole in
the 20-year-old pipeline was
a quarter-inch in diameter.
Tesoro officials were investi-
gating what caused the hole
in the 6-inch-diameter steel
pipeline that runs under-
ground about 35 miles from
Tioga to a rail facility out-
side of Columbus, near the
Canadian border.
Roberts said state and fed-
eral regulators are monitor-
ing the cleanup, and Tesoro
estimated it would cost $4
million.
A natural layer of clay
more than 40 feet thick
underlies the spill site and
has "held the oil up" so
that it doesn't spread to
underground water sources,
Roberts said.
"It is completely contained
and under control," Roberts
said Thursday. "They got
very lucky."
Farmer finds oil spill while harvesting
Young
D. Williams
M. Williams
Associated Press
A woman was arrested
Wednesday in connec-
tion with a robbery that
occurred on Pearl Street at
the end of September.
On Sept. 29, two victims
told police officers an
acquaintance — later iden-
tified as Chandra Todd,
34 — had broken into their
homes and assaulted them.
Todd fled the the scene
before officers arrived, said
Lt. Kevin Russell, public
information officer for
Benton police.
After an investigation,
officers obtained a warrant
for Todd’s arrest.
She was charged with
third-degree battery and
residential burglary.
Woman
arrested for
residential
burglary
By Sarah Derouen
sderouen@bentoncourier.com
Ernest E. ‘Gene’ Ballard
Ernest E. “Gene” Ballard, 84, on
Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013, had a special meet-
ing with his Lord Jesus, it was Face to Face.
Gene was born March 12,
1929, in Benton, Ark.. He is
survived by his wife of 64 years,
Vonceille; three sons, Glenn
(Paige) Ballard of Little Rock,
and Sam (Becky) Ballard, Steve
(Debbi) Ballard and daughter-in-
law, Cindy Ballard, all of Benton.
He enjoyed his five grandchil-
dren, Jason Ballard, Brook Neufer, Kelsey
Schramko, Anna Ballard, and Harrison
Ballard; and seven great-grandchildren.
Preceding Gene in death were his par-
ents, Sam and Mary Ballard of Benton; two
brothers, Benjamin and Rowland Ballard;
and a sister, Maudie Posey.
Gene served as a veteran of the U.S.
Army, retired from the U.S. Postal Service
after 32 years of service, was an avid fisher-
man, and loved to play and coach.
Join the family in the celebration of his
life at the First Baptist Church in Benton
at 11 a.m. Monday, Oct. 14. Officiating are
Ministers Greg
Kirksey and Edd Spurlock and Frances
Raley.
Visitation will be held Monday one hour
prior to service. Interment is at Sharon
Cemetery.
Memorials may be made to First Baptist
Church, 211 S. Market St., Benton, AR
72015.
Online guestbook: www.rollerfuneral-
homes.com/ballard
Family comments: Special thanks is
extended to Hospice Home Care of Little
Rock and the First Baptist Church of
Benton.
Christine Enfield
Christine Enfield, 50, of Benton passed
away on Sept. 28, 2013. She was born Dec.
24, 1962, to Charles and Viann Kueber in
Flint, Mich.
Christine always had a kind
word for everyone she met and
a ready smile that could make
you feel better just by seeing it.
She had a passion for cake deco-
rating and a passion for travel
and loved all of her extended
family equally, from her friends
in school to the friends she made every-
where we moved. From Alaska to Phoenix
to Denver, then to Arkansas, she was sup-
portive and always made the most out of our
lives together. If she had things her way, we
would never have left Arizona the first time
since having a home that we could raise our
kids in their whole life was important to her.
This makes it all the more astounding that
she stuck with me. Chrissy was the light of
my life for 25 years.
She was preceded in death by her mother,
Viann Kueber.
Chrissy is survived by her loving husband
of 25 years, Rick Enfield; two sons, Jesse and
John Enfield; her father, Charles Kueber;
two brothers, Kevin and Kim Kueber; a sis-
ter, Diann Mallette; and many family mem-
bers and friends who all loved her and will
miss her dearly.
A celebration of life will be held at 2 p.m.
today, Oct. 12, at Dial and Dudley Funeral
Home in Bryant.
Online guestbook: www.dialanddudleyfu-
neralhome.com.
(Picture)
Ronald George ‘Ronnie’ Young
Ronald George “Ronnie” Young, 65,
of Bauxite passed away Oct. 10, 2013, in
Benton. He was born Oct. 24, 1947, to the
late George O. and Anna (Barchoni) Young
in DuBois, Pa. He worked for Union Pacific
Railroad as a signalman and was a member
of APA and the Brotherhood of Railroad
Signalman and a Catholic.
Besides his parents, he was preceded in
death by one sister, Patricia Nelson.
He is survived by his wife,
Sherry Sue Ryles Young; two
daughters, Amanda Leigh Hays
and husband Bill of Benton,
La., and Angie Gabbard and
husband Richard of Kokomo,
Ind.; five grandchildren,
Courtney Hays, Cami Hays,
Zachary Crowe, Samantha
Turner and Roxie Wray; one sister, Judy
Lewis of Locus Grove, Ga.; and other nieces,
nephews and friends.
Funeral service will be held at 11 a.m.,
Monday, Oct. 14, at Roller-Ballard Funeral
Home with Brother Jerry Melton (Bro.
Punkin) officiating. Burial will follow at
Pinecrest Memorial Park in Alexander.
Serving as pallbearers will be Jonathan
Rickard, Clint Vocque, Jamie Cockrum, Bill
Hays, Preston Vandiver and Michael Nelson.
Honorary pallbearers are Bobby Bryant,
Larry Coger, B.J. Patterson, Eldon Moore
and Gordon Palmer
Visitation will be held from 3 to 5 p.m.
Sunday, Oc. 13, at the funeral home.
Online guestbook: www.rollerfuneral-
homes.com/ballard
Michael Ray Williams
Michael Ray Williams, 46, passed away
Oct. 6, 2013. Michael was born May 1,
1967, in Little Rock to Odell and Christine
Williams. He worked as a
mechanic for the Pulaski
County Road and Bridge
Department.
Michael is survived by his
devoted wife of 11 years, Sondra
Willfong Williams; three sons,
Cody Ray and Jason Michael
Williams and Justin Michael
Hogue; two brothers, Robert Wayne and
Victor Paul Williams; and his parents, Odell
and Christine Williams, all of Mabelvale.
He also had a deceased brother, Donald
Odell Williams.
Funeral service will be held at 11 a.m.
Saturday, Oct. 12, at Smith Family Funeral
Home, 322 N. Market St. in Benton.
Visitation was held from 6 to 8 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 11, at the funeral home. For
information, call 501-778-7100.
Online guest book: www.
SmithFamilyCares.com.
Donald Odell Williams
Donald Odell Williams, 49, passed away
Oct. 6, 2013. Donald was born Aug. 19, 1964,
in Little Rock to Odell and
Christine Williams.
Donald worked as a fore-
man for the Pulaski County
Road and Bridge Department.
Donald was preceded
in death by his daughter,
Samantha Williams.
Donald is survived by his
devoted wife of 15 years, Lisa Williams; two
sons, Jonathan and Chris Williams; a daugh-
ter, Hannah Logan; his mother and father,
Christine and Odell Williams; two brothers,
Robert and Victor Williams, all of Mabelvale;
grandchildren, Kaylynn and Taylor Cole
of Mabelvale and Madison and Johnny
Williams of Benton; his in-laws, Becky
Welch and Doyle Stogner of Mabelvale; and
many extended family members and friends
who loved him dearly and will miss him
always.
He also had a deceased brother, Michael
Ray Williams
Funeral service will be held at 11 a.m.
Saturday, Oct. 12, at Smith Family Funeral
Home, 322 N. Market St. in Benton. Burial
will follow at McPherson Cemetery in the
Sardis Community.
Visitation was held from 6 to 8 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 11, at the funeral home. For
information call 501-778-7100.
Online guestbook: www.
Ballard
HOT SPRINGS — The
Museum of Contemporary
Art on Hot Springs'
Bathhouse Row couldn't
make it financially and is to
permanently shut down at
the end of the month.
Museum board chair-
man Charlie Canterberry
said Thursday the museum
has struggled to raise
money and can't sustain
operations. Canterberry
said he's grateful for the
support he received from
Hot Springs National
Park Superintendent Josie
Fernandez and her staff.
He said that like many
other nonprofits, the muse-
um has struggled to raise
capital, which it needs to
bring quality exhibitions to
Hot Springs.
The Sentinel-Record
reports the museum signed
a 60-year lease with the
National Park Service in
2008 to operate in the Ozark
Bath House. The park ser-
vice has supported renova-
tions of the historic bath
houses to turn them into
viable commercial proper-
ties.
"We have notified them
and will be discussing it
with them and working
together as we go through
the procedure," Canterberry
said.
The museum board
formed in 2003, and the
museum opened in the
Ozark Bath House in 2009,
drawing thousands of visi-
tors over the past four years.
The space hosted numer-
ous exhibitions, including a
show of portraits by photog-
rapher Mike Disfarmer that
illustrate the lives and emo-
tions of rural people during
the early days of struggling
America.
Other shows included Liu
Miao Chan's leather figure
sculptures, Gib Singleton's
bronze sculptures and Ansel
Adam's landscape photo-
graphs.
The museum also hosted
weddings, wine, food and art
fundraisers, private parties
and barbecue events.
The museum will fulfill
its commitments to host its
events in October.
"We are very thankful to
our members who took the
time to join and participate
in our functions. We will
continue to support the arts
in the community, a major
part of the city," Canterberry
said.
Bathhouse useum to close
Associated Press
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LETTER TO THE EDITOR POLICY
State Sen. Jeremy Hutchinson, District 33,
201 E. North St., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 773-
3760, jeremy.hutchinson@senate.ar.gov.
State Sen. David Sanders, District 27 Room
320 State Capitol, Little Rock, AR 72201, (501)
682-6107, davidjamessanders@gmail.com.
State Sen. Alan Clark, District 13 P.O. Box
211, Lonsdale, AR 72087, (501) 262-3360, alan.
clark@senate.ar.gov.
State Rep. Ann Clemmer, District 23, 7415
Camille Drive, Benton, AR 72015, (501) 316-
0364, avclemmer@sbcglobal.net.
State Rep. Andy Davis, District 31 P.O. Box
30248, Little Rock, AR 72260, (501) 837-5109,
andy.davis@arkansashouse.org.
State Rep. Andy Mayberry, District 27 3022
E. Woodson Lateral Road, Hensley, AR 72065,
(501) 888-3522, andymayberry@windstream.net.
State Rep. Kim Hammer, District 28, 1411
Edgehill Dr., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 840-3841,
kimdhammer@yahoo.com.
Circuit Judge Bobby McCallister, 22nd
Judicial District, Division 1, Saline County
Courthouse, 200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015,
(501) 303-5635.
Circuit Judge Gary Arnold, 22nd Judicial
District, Division 2, Saline County Courthouse,
200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 303-
5664.
Circuit Judge Grisham Phillips, 22nd
Judicial District, Division 3, Saline County
Courthouse, 200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015,
(501) 303-5628.
Circuit Judge Robert Herzfeld, 22nd
Judicial District, Division 4, Saline County Annex,
321 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 303-
1584.
District Judge Michael Robinson, Benton
District, 1605 Edison Ave., Benton, AR 72019,
(501) 303-5670.
District Judge Stephanie Casady, Bryant
District (Bryant, Alexander, Bauxite, Haskell,
Shannon Hills), Boswell Municipal Complex, 210
SW Third St., Bryant, AR 72022, (501) 847-5223.
Saline County Judge Lanny Fite,
Courthouse 200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015,
(501) 303-5640.
Prosecuting Attorney Ken Casady, 22nd
Juicial District, 102 S. Main St., Benton, AR
72015, (501) 315-7767.
Saline County Sheriff Cleve Barfield, Saline
County Detention Center, 735 S. Neeley St.,
Benton, AR 72015; (501) 303-5609.
news@bentoncourier.com
HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS
“Congress shall make no law ... abridging the freedom
of speech, or of the press ... .”
— From the First Amendment to Constitution
Today is the 285th day of 2013 and the 21st day of
autumn.
TODAY’S HISTORY: In 1492, explorer
Christopher Columbus’ expedition made landfall in
the Bahamas.
In 1945, the Allied Control Council in Germany
decreed that the Nazi political party be dissolved.
In 1960, Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev inter-
rupted a session of the U.N. General Assembly by
banging his shoe on a table.
In 2000, a suicide bomb attack on the USS Cole in
Yemen killed 17 sailors and wounded 39.
TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS: Dick Gregory (1932- ),
comedian/author; Tony Kubek (1935- ), broadcast-
er/baseball player; Luciano Pavarotti (1935-2007),
opera singer; Chris Wallace (1947- ), TV journal-
ist; Hugh Jackman (1968- ), actor; Kirk Cameron
(1970- ), actor; Marion Jones (1975- ), track and field
athlete; Bode Miller (1977- ), Olympic skier; Josh
Hutcherson (1992- ), actor.
TODAY’S FACT: The United Nations Population
Fund estimated that the world’s population reached
7 billion at the end of October 2011, but according
to U.S. Census Bureau demographers, that number
was not reached until four months later.
TODAY’S SPORTS: In 1982, Paul Molitor had
five hits in Game 1 of the World Series, helping
the Milwaukee Brewers win 10-0 over the St. Louis
Cardinals.
TODAY’S QUOTE: “If it is a mistake of the head
and not the heart don’t worry about it, that’s the way
we learn.” -- Earl Warren
TODAY’S NUMBER: 5 -- medals track-and-field
athlete Marion Jones was awarded in the 2000
Summer Olympics. All were returned in 2007, after
she admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs.
TODAY’S MOON: Between first quarter moon
(Oct. 11) and full moon (Oct. 18).
T
hirty-two years ago, Ronald
Reagan gave his first
Inaugural Address. His
words still illuminate.
“We are a nation that has a govern-
ment -- not the other way around,”
he said. “And this makes us special
among the nations of the Earth.”
For the past nearly two weeks,
some of the temporary custodians
of our government -- President
Barack Obama and Senate Majority
Leader Harry Reid,
to name two -- have
impressed upon the
nation their scorn for
this same founding
principle. That, of
course, means their
scorn for Us, the
People. Above all, in
trying to force House
Republicans to fund
Obamacare against
the wishes of the
voters who elected
them, they want us to understand
that we don’t “have” a government,
the government has us.
And not only us, but everything
else. That’s why, for the first time, I
feel like a tenant in my own country
as President Obama has assumed the
role of landlord.
Meanwhile, House Republicans
passed at least 10 “mini” bills to fund
services from the National Institutes
of Health, including cancer trials
for children (“Listen, why would we
want to do that?” as Senate Leader
Reid notoriously asked), to Veterans
Affairs, to national parks, to the
District of Columbia. The Democrat
majority in the Senate, however,
refused to approve them. In alliance
with the White House, theirs is the
strategy of the monolith: all or noth-
ing.
Why? If Congress funds the more
popular or relied-upon parts of the
federal government, the American
people won’t mind a bit not funding
or even defunding the unpopular or
unnecessary parts, and that includes
Obamacare. Conversely, Democrats
really seem to believe that only in a
total shutdown will Americans feel
“maximum pain.” According to such
thinking, in our pain lies Democrat
gain.
It makes a great party motto: “In
pain they trust.” Engender enough
of it and the Democrats think they’ll
drive right over the Republicans to a
virtual one-party state.
But maybe the grand strategy
backfired. Something’s wrong when
Landlord Obama, his administra-
tion busy ordering up “barrycades”
and roadblocks for everything from
the Grand Tetons to the Smoky
Mountains, ekes out just a 37 percent
approval rating this week.
It rankles. I don’t think Americans
will ever forget this president for
using the 2013 budget battle shut-
down - the 18th in three decades -- to
lower booms and erect “keep out”
signs all over the country just as
though he owns it. It started at the
World War II Memorial, where our
veterans have been barricaded out
of the open-air plaza they fought for
and even built, since much of the pri-
vate funds that constructed it came
from veterans groups. From that
symbolic spot on the Washington
Mall -- where, also symbolically,
illegal aliens have received special
privileges as when an “amnesty” rally
on the National Mall was permitted
to proceed despite the shutdown -- a
New Obama Order has taken shape.
Unexpectedly, this federal flexing
has been most visibly enforced by
a thuggish National Park Service
(NPS).
Incredibly, we have now seen
NPS, in the name of the shutdown,
block access to everything from
1,100 square miles of prime fishing
in Florida Bay to scenic overlooks
along the Potomac River. We’ve seen
kids prevented from practicing soc-
cer on a field deemed “the govern-
ment’s,” and the privately run, pri-
vately staffed Claude Moore Colonial
Farm shuttered (though it finally
reopened just this morning), both
in McLain, Va. We’ve seen the NPS
drop orange road cones to prevent
drivers from pulling over to catch a
glimpse of Mount Rushmore; tourists
hustled out of Yellowstone by NPS
and ordered not to snap pictures of
bison on their way out (no “recreat-
ing” allowed in a shutdown). We’ve
seen “barrycades” go up around the
famed geyser Old Faithful to obstruct
the view from a nearby lodge.
Walking through Rock Creek Park,
the national parkland in Washington,
D.C., I’ve seen a massive concrete
barrier, courtesy of the NPS, block-
ing access to a tiny parking lot (four
slots) adjacent to a foot trail through
the woods.
Since when is the manpower
required to block four parking spaces
by the woods considered an “essen-
tial” government service? Since
rubbing the nation’s face in the shut-
down became the president’s policy.
It’s little wonder, then, that Twitter
has taken to calling the White House
the “Spite House.” From such petty
tyrannies -- look out.
Fortunately, the answer lies in
the very next lines in Reagan’s 1981
Inaugural address: “Our government
has no power except that granted it
by the people. It is time to check and
reverse the growth of government,
which shows signs of having grown
beyond the consent of the governed.”
Diana West can be contacted via
dianawest@verizon.net. Follow her on
Twitter @diana_west_.
The 2013 shutdown:
What would Reagan say?
EDITORIAL CARTOON
B
ack when the earth was cooling
and dinosaurs were roaming the
Saline River bottoms, I had a
12th-grade government teacher who was
probably the best teacher I ever had, bar
none.
She was somewhat
old-timey, however. She
would say with a curled
lip that she didn’t believe
in a “method.” She said
that with a blackboard and
a good text, her students
would learn some govern-
ment. And did we ever.
But that was a special
teacher. And a special time,
the early to mid-60s. And
a special place, Little Rock
Central. Lo these many
decades later, there are a
few – very few – oases of
quality, but for the most
part, Little Rock public
schools are Third-World pigsties. We
do not know how lucky we are as Saline
Countians.
The simple fact is, our schools are some
of the best in the United States. But even
our schools can improve. That’s why our
districts have enthusiastically embraced
the Common Core state standards.
It is important to note what Common
Core is not about. As you might imagine,
the wacked-out tea-bagging wing-nut right
has descended upon Common Core like
a plague of locusts. First, they contend
that it is a not-so-secret plot by the federal
government (or maybe even the United
Nations!) to take over the public schools.
That’s nuts.
After years of work and study by dis-
tinguished educators, Common Core
was developed and promulgated by (get
ready) the National Governors Association
Center for Best Practices and the Council
of Chief State School Officers. The reason
that doesn’t sound very federal is because
it isn’t.
Second, they contend that Common
Core is a left-wing scheme to control
thoughts of our young people by con-
trolling what gets taught in the public
schools. That’s even more nuts.
Common Core deals with the two major
areas of the intellectual growth of our
children in K through 12 education: math-
ematics and English language arts. That’s
a high-sounding way of saying readin’, wri-
tin’ and ‘rithmetic. Teachers are not told
what to teach or how to teach it. Common
Core simply establishes an assessment
level that schools will strive to meet, much
like the benchmark system that it will
replace.
It is not content-driven, so propaganda
will not be in the cards. And besides,
what can be indoctrinating about math?
There is not a liberal or conservative, left
or right, Democratic or Republican, way
to understand the Pythagorean theorem
regarding a right triangle: a-squared plus
b-squared equals c-squared.
I know of two different ways to under-
stand that equation. My suspicion is that
there are more than two. Common Core
proponents would argue that a student
is better off if he or she learns all of the
ways to understand the equation. It would
be hard to argue with that approach, but I
assure you there are those who will try.
So what is Common Core about? First,
it promotes and assures local control of
the way our schools strive for excellence.
Second, it will eventually be internation-
ally benchmarked, so that our math
and English language arts students can
be evaluated against and compared to
students from other countries (right
now Japan eats our lunch in math and
Germany –yes, Germany – eats our lunch
in English language arts).
Third, Common Core will establish
a coast-to-coast standard in K through
12, serving as a more accurate predictor
of post-secondary success regardless of
where a student lives.
And finally, it will bring about a huge
pool of students for assessment purposes.
Arkansas is part of a 25-state group that
will participate in common assessment of
its Common Core student population.
We here in this area have had little
to say about the sorry state of education
in this country generally because our
schools are of such high quality. But no
one can deny that, nationally, schools are
in trouble and things are getting worse
fast.
Common Core, while it may not be per-
fect, is a great start in the right direction.
Just be careful whom you listen to.
George D. Ellis is chairman of the
Democratic Party of Saline County and a
practicing attorney.
Common Core:
It’s a move in the
right direction
Today in history
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The Saline Courier
Founded in 1876
Phone: (501) 315-8228 • Fax: (501) 315-1230 • Email: news@bentoncourier.com
Vicki J. Dorsch
Business Manager
vdorsch@bentoncourier.com
DaViD Wills
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anDreW stoVall
circulation director
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Patricia stuckey
coMposing director
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ricky Walters
press ForeMan
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steVe Boggs • Publisher
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Brent DaVis • editor
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Diana
West
Page 4 – The Saline Courier
news@bentoncourier.com Saturday, October 12, 2013
OpiniOn
GeorGe D.
ellis
In My
HuMble
OpInIOn
WEB POLL OF THE WEEK
Do you feel the selection
of Clive Barfield as interim
sheriff of Saline County
was a good choice?
Results:
74% YES
9% NO
17% No Opinion
*Poll began on October 4 and closed October 11.
A total of 23 votes were cast. This is not a scientific poll.
Next week’s poll:
What is your favorite part of the Arkansas State Fair?
Food? Rides? Shows? Rodeo?
The poll is open, but will close at noon, October 18.
Results of the poll will be published here on October 19.
To participate in our weekly web poll, go to our website at
www.bentoncourier.com to cast your vote.
The web poll is located on the right side of the page.
Breaking
news
www.bentoncourier.com
SportS
Saturday, October 12, 2013
news@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page 5
saline
scoreboard
FRIDAY
Benton def. Sheridan 42-6
Bryant def. Fair 49-0
Robinson def. Bauxite 47-40
BHG def. Jessieville 42-7
Glen Rose def. Bismarck 50-0
TODAY
Volleyball
Benton and Bryant at Lady Cat
Tourney (Conway)
Cross Country
Benton at Cyclone Inv.
(Russellville)
Dance
Benton Dance Competition
sec football
schedule
TODAY
25 Missouri at 7 Georgia, 11 a.m.
14 S. Carolina at Arkansas, 11:21
W. Carolina at Auburn, 1 p.m.
17 Florida at 10 LSU, 2:30 p.m.
1 Alabama at Kentucky, 6 p.m.
Bowl. Green at Miss. St. 6:30 pm
9 Tex. A&M at Ole Miss, 7:30.
Hornets demolish War Eagles
BRYANT – The Bryant
Hornets make quick work of
the outgunned Little Rock
Fair War Eagles, racing to
a 20-0 first-quarter lead en
route to a 49-0 win Friday
night.
The Hornets (3-3, 2-1
South) were able to sub-
stitute freely by midway
through the second quarter.
They led 33-0 at halftime,
and added a safety early
in the third quarter to lead
35-0 and keep the clock run-
ning continuously through-
out most of the second half.
About the only bad news
for the Hornets happened
before the game began,
when standout kicker Alex
Denker aggravated a knee
injury. Head Coach Paul
Calley said Denker’s injury
happened during pre-game
warmups, and that he might
miss next week’s game at
Sheridan.
Before the starters left
the game, they scored on all
three first-quarter posses-
sions and piled up 266 yards
in the first half. Brendan
Young capped the opening
drive with a 9-yard touch-
down run just 1:34 into the
game.
Brushawn Hunter scored
on a 16-yard run to make
it 13-0 after a failed extra
point.
The War Eagles man-
aged just 42 yards and one
first down in the first half.
Their third drive failed on a
fumbled punt attempt, and
the Hornets scored on just
one play – an 18-yard touch-
down run by Austin Vail to
make it 20-0. Denker’s sec-
ond PAT in three attempts
was also his last kick of the
evening.
Young added a one-yard
touchdown run early in the
second quarter to make
it 27-0 before the Hornet
reserves took over.
Madison Schrader play
the rest of the way at quar-
terback, but not before
starter Brandan Warner
connected on 6 of 7 passes
for 94 yards.
Ryan Hall and Hunter
Barksdale tackled War
Eagle quarterback Juan
Dukes in the end zone on
Fair’s first possession of
the second half to make it
35-0. From that point on, the
clock did not stop and the
game ended just after 9 p.m.
Kylon Boyle and Sevante
Turner added 1-yard touch-
down runs in the second
HASKELL ― Of all the things
the Harmony Grove Cardinals
(4-2) have accomplished since
getting a football program, beat-
ing the Jessieville Lions (1-5)
is not one of them; until Week
6 this season. Picked fourth,
just behind the Lions, to start
the season, the Cardinals came
out hard and heavy on Friday,
thumping the Lions 42-7 on
Jimmy Red Parker Field in
Haskell.
“We are always happy to
win,” Head Coach Red Parker
said. “[Jessieville] always does
a great job of running the traps
and we did not do a good job
stopping them tonight. They
ran some jet sweeps that
hurt us and ran off-tackle and
knocked us around a little bit.
Everything considered, thanks
to the turnovers, we did OK.”
Harmony Grove forced five
turnovers on the Lions a week
after snatching four takeaways
from Bismarck in a 36-22 win.
But the biggest headline from
the Cardinals’ victory on Friday
was the performance from
first-year quarterback, Landen
Lewis.
The senior ran for 120 yards
and three touchdowns in the
win, adding 66 yards through
the air and another score on 3
of 7 passing to add to the Lions
miserable night.
“For a guy that never has
played, I’d say he is doing
pretty good,” Parker said about
his quarterback.
Harmony Grove opened
the game with a forced three-
and-out on the Lions before
getting the scoring started
with a 6-play, 48-yard drive
capped with an 8-yard plunge
from senior running back Nic
Johnson to put the Cardinals up
6-0 with 8:02 left in the opening
frame.
The Cardinals were given
a gift on the ensuing kickoff,
recovering a high wobbler
and taking over on the Lions
30-yard line. With good field
position once again, the
Cardinals could not come away
with any points, stalling on the
7-yard line with a turnover on
downs.
Despite coming away with
nothing on their last series,
the Cardinals used some more
good defense to take the ball
away on another punt from
Jessieville to leave the score at
6-0 early in the second quarter.
Harmony Grove returned the
favor with a punt, setting the
Lions up on their own 34-yard
line. This time Jessieville finally
broke through the Cardinals
defense, putting together a
9-play drive, ending with a
1-yard run from quarterback
Brandon Garner. A good point
after and the Lions were up 7-6
Panthers jump on Jackets
BENTON – Benton
Panther Coach Scott
Neathery stressed to his
team the importance of
jumping on the Sheridan
Yellowjackets early on
Friday, especially after the
Jackets stung the Panthers
for a 17-14 upset last season
in which Neathery said his
team should have won.
The Panthers were listen-
ing as senior quarterback
Tarek Beaugard hit senior
receiver J.V. Davis down
the middle of the field for
a 45-yard touchdown pass
on Benton’s first offensive
play of the game. Just 14
seconds had ticked off the
clock that first series as
the Panthers cruised to a
42-6 victory over Sheridan
on Friday night at Panther
Stadium.
“We wanted to try to get
some momentum quick and
we were able to do that,”
Neathery said. “I basically
told the team it’s kind of the
same scenario here, they
[were blown out] two games
before us and they’re going
to get all jacked up to play
us and we need to know
that. That’s why we needed
to start quick. I talked all
week about that.”
But it wasn’t just the
offense that was clicking
on Friday night as the
defense played strong all
night long forcing five
punts, three turnovers and
three turnover-on-downs,
including Sheridan’s last
drive of the game when the
Yellowjackets were stuffed
at the Panther 1-yard line
to hold them to just the six
points.
“I was proud of our
defense,” Neathery said. “I
thought they played well.
They tackled well tonight.”
The Panthers (4-2, 2-1
South) gave up 245 yards
of total offense, but 125 of
those came on Sheridan’s
last two possessions of the
night after Benton caused
the sportsmanship rule
(clock continuously runs
when a team is up by 35
points in the second half)
with Panther senior Shaun
Carey’s 4-yard TD run to put
Benton up 35-0 with 5:44 left
in the third quarter. Carey
missed most of the Salt
Bowl and last week’s game
with an ankle injury, and
finished with 43 yards on 8
carries and 4 catches for 73
yards.
“Shaun has a little speed,”
Neathery said. “I was glad
to see Shaun come back.
He’s had a couple weeks
off with his ankle deal and I
thought he ran the ball well
tonight.”
Sheridan (1-5, 0-3)
responded on the very
Benton Panthers
running back
Shaun Carey
carries the ball
during Benton’s
42-6 win over
the Sheridan
Yellowjackets
on Friday
at Panther
Stadium. Carey
caught 4 balls
for 73 yards and
ran 8 times for
43 yards and a
touchdown after
being sidelined
basically the
past two games
with an ankle
injury.
STEVEN LOVELL/Special to
The Saline Courier
RICK NATION/Special to The Saline Courier
Junior Hornets QB Brandan Warner is behind senior center Kurt
Calley in the Hornets’ 49-0 win over Little Rock Fair on Friday.
by steve boggs
sboggs@bentoncourier.com
by Josh briggs
jbriggs@bentoncourier.com
Lewis has big night in win
Harmony Grove
senior quarterback
Landen Lewis
looks for a hole in
the Magnet Cove
defense during the
Cardinals 30-20
win in Week 3.
Lewis rushed for
120 yards and
three touchdowns
in Harmony
Grove’s 42-7 win
over Jessieville on
Friday. Lewis also
completed three
passes for 66
yards and a TD in
the win.
STEVEN LOVELL/Special to The
Saline Courier
Miners’
comeback
too late on
homecoming
BAUXITE - Homecoming
week in Bauxite signaled the
halfway point of the regular
season and it was a tremen-
dous affair. Joe T. Robinson
came to town and brought
along a scrappy football team
with a powerful running
game. Both school’s entered
this game needing to secure
their first conference win, and
both desperately needing a
second victory on the season.
Robinson would ride their
powerful running game to
escape this game with a score
of 47 to 40.
Bauxite opened this game
with hard running by their
quarterback Trent Rooks.
Strong offensive line play by
the Miners allowed Rooks
to get Bauxite their first two
scores of the night by repeat-
edly running the keeper.
Robinson scored once in the
first, also on a quarterback
keeper.
The second quarter began
with excellent defensive play
by the Miners. At the 11:50
mark, three Bauxite defensive
player’s broke through the
Senator offensive line and
proceeded to collectively
knock the Senator fullback for
a 3-yard loss. Thirty seconds
later, that same defensive
unit recovered a bad snap by
by a.J. russenberg
Special to The Saline Courier
HORNETS, page 6
by tony lenahan
tlenahan@bentoncourier.com
PANTHERS, page 6
CARDINALS, page 6
MINERS, page 6
BENTON – The Benton
Lady Panthers improved
to 16-2 overall and 10-0 in
the 7A/6A South confer-
ence with another sweep
of a conference opponent
on Thursday at Benton
Arena. The Lady Panthers
defeated Texarkana 3-0
(25-12, 25-13, 25-14) and
have swept every South
opponent this season.
Junior setter Braxton
Chumley had 13 assists
and four kills, junior
Taylor Lindberg had 11
assists, three kills and two
assisted blocks,
senior Allison
Reynolds, who
was named
Homecoming
Queen on
Friday, had 10
kills and two
assisted blocks,
junior Ashlie
Dintleman had seven kills
and three aces, and senior
Xandra Lock had six aces
and five kills.
Lady
Panthers
win again
Reynolds
by tony lenahan
tlenahan@bentoncourier.com
6 The Saline Courier
Saturday, October 12, 2013
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Hogs must get running game going, tackle
FAYETTEVILLE - Both
the Arkansas Razorbacks
and South Carolina
Gamecocks have cause
to have felt better about
themselves earlier this
season than perhaps they
do now heading into their
Saturday clash marking
Arkansas’ homecoming
game at Reynolds Razorback
Stadium.
Coach Steve Spurrier’s
14th-ranked Gamecocks, 4-1,
2-1 in the SEC East, and first-
year Coach Bret Bielema’s
Razorbacks, 3-3, 0-2 in the
SEC West, kick off at 11:21
a.m. Saturday on the SEC-TV
network.
South Carolina began
the preseason ranked sixth
by the Associated Press so
its fall to No. 14 obviously
shows the Gamecocks so
far not meeting expecta-
tions. Their lone loss,
41-30 in Athens, Ga. to the
nationally No. 5 and now
seventh-ranked SEC East
rival Georgia, dropped the
Gamecocks.
But it’s the unimpressive
victories thereafter, 35-25
and 35-28 at home over cus-
tomary SEC East doormats
Vanderbilt and Kentucky
sandwiching a 28-25 noncon-
ference squeaker at Central
Florida keeping Carolina out
of the Top 10.
Gamecocks junior defen-
sive end Jadeveon Clowney
entered the August pre-
season the most heralded
defensive player in the coun-
try having helped South
Carolina to an 11-2 record
with an Outback Bowl vic-
tory over Michigan including
his ESPY Award winning hit
of Michigan running back
Vincent Smith that dislodged
both Smith’s helmet and the
football.
Clowney recovered the
football setting up a South
Carolina touchdown.
But Clowney missed
Saturday’s Kentucky
game with a rib injury, not
announced by the South
Carolina trainer. It caused
wondering, possibly includ-
ing Spurrier by statements
early in the week, if Clowney
was saving himself for the
2013 NFL draft when he will
be draft eligible.
By Wednesday, Spurrier
backtracked as fast as he
could with as close to apolo-
gies as the veteran fabled
Hall of Fame coach could
muster.
“We all handled it
poorly,” Spurrier said
on Wednesday’s SEC Media
Teleconference. “All of us
did. The proper protocol
when a player is hurt he tells
the trainer or doctor, ‘Hey,
I can’t go. There’s too much
pain. And the trainer tells the
head coach, “He’s out. He’s
not ‘ playing and I say, ‘OK,
he’s out. He’s not playing.’
We all didn’t do that and it
caused some confusion. We
didn’t handle it well.”
Spurrier said Clowney
indeed ailed and has
worked hard to rehab this
week. South Carolina defen-
sive coordinator Lorenzo
“Whammy” Ward, Arkansas’
cornerbacks coach in 2008
under former Arkansas
Coach Bobby Petrino, on
Thursday termed Clowney
“probable” to play against
Arkansas.
However even with
Clowney, it hasn’t been the
defense but offense butter-
ing South Carolina’s bread,
Spurrier said.
“Hopefully our defense
can play a lot better than we
have lately.”
The South Carolina
offense features tailback
Mike Davis, 92 carries
for 614 yards and eight
touchdowns, receiver
Bruce Ellington, also a
Gamecocks star basketball
point guard, 15 catches for
236 yards; and run-pass quar-
terback Connor Shaw, 60
carries for 282 yards rushing
and 66 of 96 for 927 yards
and seven touchdowns pass-
ing.
Most importantly, Shaw,
no interceptions, doesn’t turn
it over.
“He’s really good at avoid-
ing the fumbles and the care-
less plays and all this that
and the other,” Spurrier said.
“It is the reason we have
won a bunch of games. We
are not winning by dominat-
ing anybody on defense and
special teams. We have been
winning because we have
not been giving anybody
careless scores.”
Arkansas quarterback
Brandon Allen has been
victimized for two pick-6s,
interceptions returned for
touchdowns, in successive
weeks.
Though losing the last
three Saturdays at Rutgers,
the final nonconference
game for 2013, and in the
SEC to Texas A&M in
Fayetteville and Florida
in Gainesville, Fla., the
Razorbacks felt better about
themselves and were more
competitive losing 45-33 two
Saturdays ago at home in
a shootout with A&M and
Aggies Heisman Trophy
quarterback Johnny Manziel,
than losing 30-10 to No. 18
Florida in Gainesville.
Arkansas’ defense actually
played pretty well, holding
Florida to a season-low 115
yards rushing , but poor
tackling on short pass-
es became 51- and 38-yard
touchdowns from Florida
quarterback Tyler Murphy
to receiver Solomon Patton
undid Arkansas.
Florida’s SEC leading
defense snuffed Arkansas’
running game. The Gators
forced Allen to attempt 41
passes.
South Carolina’s defense
isn’t Florida’s. So Bielema
seeks to reestablish the
strong running game
that young running backs
Alex Collins and Jonathan
Williams have led.
By Nate Allen
Razorback Report
with 5:39 left in the half.
After a 15-yard unsports-
manlike conduct call against
the Lions at the end of their
drive, the Cardinals were sure
to get good starting position
again on the ensuing kickoff.
But sophomore running back
Jon Johnson had other plans,
taking the ball 65 yards to
house for the TD to put the
Cardinals up 12-7 after anoth-
er botched 2-point attempt.
Still with all of the momen-
tum, the Cardinals forced
the game’s first turnover
on a fumble by Lions run-
ning back Nick Marshall on
Jessieville’s first play of the
series. Waisting minimal
time, Lewis scampered 33
yards before getting knocked
out of bounds at the 1-yard
line by Garner. One play later
and Lewis and company were
up 20-7 still with five minutes
to go until halftime.
The Cardinals continued
to pile on when senior Ben
Barber collected another
turnover, this one an intercep-
tion, setting the Birds up for
another TD.
Starting 64 yards from the
end zone, Harmony Grove
counted on Lewis once again
to get the Cardinals to the
promised land. Faced with
a first-and-25, Lewis hooked
up with senior receiver Zane
Anderson for a 51-yard TD
strike to put the Cardinals up
28-7 at the break.
The second half didn’t get
much better for Jessieville as
Harmony Grove scored right
out of the gate again, this
time on a 35-yard scamper
from Lewis, his second rush-
ing TD of the night, putting
Harmony Grove out way in
front, 36-7 with 8:38 left in the
third quarter.
Jessieville couldn’t get
anything to go its direction,
fumbling the ball again back
to the Cardinals with senior
Tristyn Williamson recover-
ing. After punting the ball
back, Harmony Grove forced
its fourth turnover (third
fumble) of the night on the
Lions’ next drive.
“I am proud for our
defense,” Parker said. “The
name of the game needs to
be ‘win the kicking game and
win the turnover battle’ and
if we can do that then we are
going to be OK.”
Needing to score to force
the mercy rule, Harmony
Grove used 9 plays to go 44
yards, capping the drive on
the legs of Lewis once more,
this time from 4 yards out,
putting his team up 42-7 with
7:39 left in the game.
With the clock running,
Harmony Grove forced its
third straight fumble to end
the game in a Cardinals vic-
tory to get to 4-2 overall on
the season and 2-1 in 5-3A
conference play.
Before Friday’s win, the
Cardinals had been outscored
69-26 in two previous losses
to Jessieville.
Aside from Lewis’ huge
night, Nic Johnson added 42
yards on 10 carries and a TD
in the win. Harmony Grove
combined for 275 yards on 42
plays while allowing the Lions
to gain 259 on 48 snaps.
Harmony Grove travels to
Centerpoint in Week 7 to spar
with the Knights. Kickoff is
set for 7 p.m.
Glen Rose wins big
Glen Rose
senior Kyle
Peterson
makes a
move in the
Beavers’ 50-0
win over
the Lions in
Bismarck
on Friday.
Glen Rose
has won five
consecutive
games since
its season-
opening loss
to Malvern.
JAY MANNING/jayspho-
todesign.com
the Senators. And with 4:30
remaining in the first half,
the Miner defense held the
Senator offense to a three-
and-out. The Miner defense
worked very hard throughout
the first half and entered the
locker room at halftime trail-
ing by only a single point with
the score 27-26.
The second half of this
game began with the Senators
attacking the Miner defense
right between the tackles.
Robinson utilized the lead
dive play, time and time
again, gaining “3 yards and a
cloud of dust” on consecutive
attempts. Robinson half back
Chase Samlin followed his
fullback closely to yard after
additional yard. When Bauxite
Miner defensive player Forest
Simmerman began to sniff
out the dive play, the Senators
struck on a quick pass over
the middle. The third quarter
ended with the Miners trailing
by a score of 34-26.
The final quarter began
with a spectacular punt block
by Bauxite’s Matt Bentley, but
before the next drive could
really get started, the Senators
recovered a bad snap in the
Miner end zone. This would
result in a seventh touchdown
for the Senators. The Miner
defense would stand tough
once again late in the fourth
forcing the Senators to turn
the ball over on downs at the
9:20 mark. When suddenly
trailing by three touchdowns,
the Miner offense, led by the
hard running Trent Rooks,
played with tremendous inten-
sity to fight back to within one
score of a win. Time would
run out on this game with the
hard-playing Miners needing
only one more possession.
The final was 47-40.
This game proved to be
one of the more closely
matched of the season. The
Senators brought a tough
running game. Bauxite led
this game for only a short
time in the second quarter.
The Miners’ efforts were
somewhat hampered by three
interceptions, one bad punt,
and four critical penalties.
Bauxite has only won the
matchup with Robinson one
time since moving up to 7-4A
classification three seasons
ago. Though this one was
very close. Following the loss,
the Bauxite Miners chances
at postseason play become
further diminished.
next offensive play when
sophomore quarterback
Dustin Reid pitched it to
sophomore Brady Bibb, who
found senior receiver Cody
Thompson wide open on the
right side for a 62-yard TD
pass to make it a 35-6 game
after the extra point was
blocked. But by then it was
too late for the Yellowjackets
as Benton had already did
its damage.
Back to the first quarter
when the Panthers forced
Sheridan to punt, Benton
would need just two plays
when Beaugard hit Dyer,
who was bowling over tack-
lers, for a 27-yard gain, and
Beaugard capped the 21-sec-
ond drive with a 9-yard TD
run to make it 14-0 with 4:19
left in the first.
Beaugard finished the
game 10 of 13 passing for
210 yards and two TDs, and
ran for 57 yards and a TD.
“He’s doing a good job,”
Neathery said of his QB. “As
long as he plays within the
system, man he makes some
plays.”
The Panther defense
would continue its success
when senior safety Jesse
Benton would pick a pass
off on Sheridan’s next pos-
session, and force punts
the Yellowjackets’ next two
drives before Benton would
strike again.
Beaugard found sopho-
more receiver Colten Nix
for a 44-yard gain and Nix
would finish the Panthers’
80-yard drive, which lasted
1:04, with a 13-yard TD
catch from Beaugard.
After Benton recovered a
Sheridan fumble on the next
possession, Dyer would
rumble in from 25 yards to
put the Panthers up 28-0,
which would be the halftime
score. Dyer had 5 carries
for 71 yards and a TD and
caught 3 passes for 35 yards.
“Dyer is a good, hard run-
ner,” Neathery said. “He’s
tough to bring down.”
The Panthers, which out-
gained Sheridan 457-245 in
total yardage, were called
for 9 penalties for 73 yards,
but Neathery, and many
of the Panther fans, didn’t
agree with several of them.
“Some of them were
bogus,” Neathery said. “I
don’t ever talk about offi-
cials, but some of them were
phantom calls, so I’m going
to have to watch the film on
some of them.”
One play in particular
was a pass interference call
on senior cornerback Ryan
Rodriguez, which looked
like blatant offensive inter-
ference.
“The other guy has Ryan
by the arm and they call
Ryan, so I didn’t know what
they were doing,” Neathery
said.
There were also holding
calls on Panther receivers
which Neathery said he’s
getting used to, unfortu-
nately.
“Our receivers are always
going to get holding calls
because they block so well.
We really stress blocking
with our receivers and the
(officials) are just going to
call it on us because they’re
not used to seeing receivers
block. That sounds weird,
but it’s true. It happens all
the time.”
The Panther bench would
see some action when the
sportsmanship rule went
into effect as Benton used 15
plays and took up roughly
11 minutes (with the con-
tinuous clock) capped by
sophomore QB Cason
Maertens’ 6-yard TD pass
to junior receiver Casey
Green. Junior running back
Brandon Black had 7 car-
ries for 35 yards during the
drive. Maertens was 5 of 6
for 28 yards and the TD.
“I thought they had a
good drive on offense,”
Neathery said. “They went
down and scored. I was
pretty proud of them.”
The Panthers hit the road
to Texarkana when they
continue 7A/6A South con-
ference action against the
Razorbacks on Friday.
half to round out Bryant’s
scoring. Bryce Denker,
Alex’s brother and the
team’s punter, booted both
second-half PATs for the
Hornets.
Young led Bryant with 72
yards on 8 carries. Hunter
added 60 yards on 4 carries.
Demaja Price also scored a
touchdown for the Hornets
late in the second quarter, a
2-yard dive that made it 33-0
at halftime.
Little Rock Fair managed
just 62 yards of total offense
and three first downs on the
night. Starting quarterback
Ja’Quan Smith was injured
early in the second half and
did not return.
Bryant travels to Sheridan
next week before return-
ing home in two weeks for
Homecoming.
Panthers
From page 5
Hornets
From page 5
Cardinals
From page 5
Miners
From page 5
Saturday, October 12, 2013
The Saline Courier 7
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501-315-8340
We GroW our oWn Sod
Delivery or Pick-Up
at
3000 Lilac Circle, Benton Farm Tif
green
5405 Hwy 5
Bryant
847-2577
5405
Walk-ins Welcome or call for appointment
Tues - Fri 9-6 & Sat 9-2
• Precision Cuts for the Entire Family
• Specialized Color Services
• Shampoo Sets/Styles
• Perms
Professional
Products
Available
Classic horror play opens Friday at Royal Theatre
The Royal Players’
upcoming production of
“Frankenstein 1930” will
open Friday night, Oct.
18, at the Royal Theatre in
Downtown Benton.
Randall Earnest is direct-
ing the show, which he
described as “a Halloween
classic with a new version of
Mary Shelley’s book.” It is
adapted for the stage by Fred
Carmichael.
Performances will con-
tinue at 7 p.m. Saturday,
Oct. 19, and at 2 p.m. the fol-
lowingn Sunday. Additional
shows are scheduled Oct.
25-27 at those same times
with a bonus performance set
for 7 o’clock on Halloween
night, Oct. 31.
The Oct. 26 performance
will be included the activities
being held in conjunction
with Downtown Benton’s
Spook City celebration.
Middlebrooks Electric is
sponsoring the production.
Serving as assistant direc-
tor is Krista Hancock, and
Jacan Earnest and James
Allen are student directors.
“Frankenstein 1930” stars
Brian Roberson as Victor
Frankenstein, Amber Combs
as Elizabeth, Chris Counts
as Henry Lovitz, and Maxx
Blanford as the creature.
The cast also includes
Cassandra Lovell, Ray Rush,
Matthew McCallister, Tim
Sopel, Vivian Murray-Colyer,
Daniel Lieblong, Ray Rush,
Susan Whitley, Rayne Burns,
Meg Amason, DeLaney
Leslie and Taylor Cook.
The box office opens 30
minutes prior to show time.
Tickets for all performances
are $10 for adults, $8 for
seniors 60 and older, and
$5 for students (college and
younger).
Tickets may be purchased
online at www.theroyalplay-
ers.com or by calling 501-
315-5483 to reserve seats.
The Royal Players also is on
Facebook.
The Royal Theatre is at
111 S. Market St.
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
LYNDA HOLLENBECK/The Saline Courier
Above: Chris Counts as Henry Lovitz speaks with Amber Combs as Elizabeth in this scene from “Frankenstein 1930.” Right: Chris Counts
(Henry Lovitz), Amber Combs (Elizabeth) and Daniel Lieblong (Dr. Hellstrom) enter the laboratory of Victor Frankenstein where they find a
shocking scene. Below: Rayne Burns as Maria and Maxx Blandford as the creature play a game of jacks.
LYNDA HOLLENBECK/The Saline Courier
Left: Cassie Lovell as the maid expresses a concern in this scene. Above: Brian Roberson as Victor Frankenstein checks for a heartbeat
in the creature while Gorgo (Tim Sopel) and Dr. Hellstrom (Daniel Lieblong) observe. Below: Gorgo (Tim Sopel) observes as Victor
Frankenstein (Brian Robertson) prepares to place the brain in the creature.
8 The Saline Courier
Saturday, October 12, 2013
MAP
BUICK • GMC
501-425-3796
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Home or Business
HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING
Installation, Maintenance
and 24 Hour Service
501-425-3796
Residential &
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BROWN’S SMALL ENGINE
704 EDISON · 315-7120
Serving Saline County for 22 years
AYP
20
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discount on all parts – Old Fashion Day only
John Deere and Honda Parts excluded. Discount good October 12, 2013 only
S
&
S Sparks Jewelers
Sarah Sparks
Sherman Sparks
109 North Market St.
Downtown Benton
501-315-2178
JEWELRY & WATCH REPAIR
Hours: Tuesday-Friday 9-5
Jewelers
501-776-0406
Your local
Retailer
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Exede Internet ‡ HughesNet
116 N. Market º Benton
776-3500
Tropical Fish
Saltwater Fish
"IRDSs2EPTILES
Small Animals
Dog & Cat Supplies
INC.
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U Senior and Military
Discounts available
Humane Society of Saline
County
Come by 7600 Bauxite Hwy,
We have many pets ready
for adoption.
Check them out at
www.hssaline.org
501-557-5518
BO’S BAR-B-Q
16925 I-30
Benton, AR
315-2431
Rockin B
Horse & Mule Logging
501-317-6788
We are looking for logging jobs to do this winter,
we will give good money for your trees and
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DAVID BURTON, SR.
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501-778-4270
119 N Market St, Ste A, Benton
Merle Norman Cosmetics
A more beautiful you
Kathy Pelton
and Wanda McAdoo
Owners
Market Street
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Main Street
East Street
Sue’s
Pawn & Tack Shop
Dixie Car Club Kids Rides
Tractors
Parking
Food
Booths
B
o
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t
h
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Police
Ponies
Odd
Fellows
First United
Methodist
Church
Main
Stage >
< Kids
Stage
Booths
Booths
Parking
Parking
AUCTION Live Auction by Bob Ramsey
Cliff Lee items
Best Buy TV • McClendon Microwave
White Furniture Solid Wood Rocker
Guitar • Golf Clubs • Awning
Camo Rain Barrel
Johnston’s Home Center Floor Cleaner
FOOD: Funnel Cakes, Kettle Corn, Ribs,
Burgers, Fish Tacos, Nathan’s Hot Dogs,
Fried Pies, Fried Okra, Cotton Candy,
Deep Fried Snickers & Oreos, Fresh
Squeezed Lemonade, Catfish……..
VENDORS:
Scroll Saw art, Hair Bows, Face
Painting, Bag holders, Towels & Aprons,
Crocheted Scarves, Jewelry, Quilts, Wood
Crafts, Wreaths, Yard Signs, Flower
Arrangements, Woodworking, 31 bags,
Wood Signs, Furniture, Tupperware,
Razorback Paintings, Bird Houses, Car
Tags, Grace Adele, Velata, Scentsy , Soup
Mixes, Handmade Décor, Dolls, Candles,
Hoodies, Dog Collars, Pottery, Honey,
Sorghum, Old Fashioned Day T’Shirts,
Informational booths, SMH and more.
Grand Sponsor:
Saturday, October 12, 2013
The Saline Courier 9
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I-30 Alcoa Exit Next to Target
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Cell: 501-860-4621
1920 Congo Ste. A
Benton, AR 72015
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Cell: 501.840.3175
1016 W. South Street
Benton, AR 72015
Specializing in you with Southern Hospitality
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Walk-in’s Welcome!!
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benton, ar ˆ 501.778.2420
Moderne Salon
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811 W. South St., Benton, Arkansas 72015
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Appliance
“Serving Central Arkansas since 1947”
Richard May’s Lawn Care
10 years Local Experience
Average yard cut & weed: $25-30
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1200 Ferguson Dr. Ste. #5 Benton
“Your Computer Man”
501-776-7577
www.A-1ComputerRepair.Net
Facebook.com/A1ComputerRepair
Bull Painting Co.
“Where Quality Meets Afordability”
Quality Work GUARANTEED
• Interior/Exterior Painting
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• Wallpaper & Popcorn Removal
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• All Insurance Claims Welcome
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39
TH
ANNUAL OLD FASHIONED DAY
ENTERTAINMENT
MAIN STAGE
9:00-9:30 Opening/Prayer/Pledge
9:30-10:00 “America the Beautiful”
10:00-10:30 Old Fashioned Day King & Queen
10:30-12:30 “The Country Ramblers” Band
12:30-2:30 Old Fashioned Day Auction
2:30-3:55 Willie Nelson Tribute Concert
4:00 Drawing for OFD Quilt
Most Unique Vendor Booth Recognition
KID’S STAGE
10:00-11:00 Laura Stilwell dancers
11:00-3:30 Kids Karaoke
12:00 Skillet Throw (Gazebo)
ALL DAY EVENTS
Antique Tractor Show
Dixie Car Club
Fire House
Food Vendors
Games
Inflatables
Mollie (Antique Fire Truck)
Ponies
OFD Quilt Tickets & T-shirts
Benton Police Department
FUN:
Inflatables
Pony Rides
Karaoke
Willie Nelson Tribute
Shelby Mustang
(signed by Shelby)
Benton Police Department
Investigation Unit
Benton Fire Department
Smoke House
Skillet Throwing Contest
Most Unique Booth contest
you never know what else,
so be there.
WORSHIP
Page 10 – The Saline Courier
news@bentoncourier.com Saturday, October 12, 2013
CHURCH HOUSE
INSURANCE AGENCY
A SUBSIDIARY OF ROBERSON & ASSOCIATES INSURANCE,
REAL ESTATE AND INVESTMENT, INC.
Del Roberson
501-315-8011
droberson@robersoninsurance.com
Steve Romine, CIC
866-315-8011
sromine@robersoninsurance.com
315 N. Market, Benton, AR 72015
Providing All Forms of Insurance Coverage for your Church
Benton Women’s Clinic
Obstetrics and Gynecology
1220 Military Road | Benton, AR 72015 | 501-778-1000
John V. Baka,
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Wendy West, APN-WHNP, B.C
778.2838
2408 Military Rd
Benton AR
1515 Hwy 5 North • Benton
www.harpsfood.com
Serving Families Since 1882
Narroway & N. Main Street
Benton, Arkansas 72015
778-2544 • 847-3371
www.ashbyfuneralhome.com
Member of the Arkansas Association
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Funeral Home & Insurance
APOSTOLIC
Apostolic Christian Center
20121 I-30, Benton
501-315-2100
Pastor: Scott & Bobby McElroy
Apostolic Tabernacle Church
2314 Military Road, Benton
501-315-1855
Pastor: Rev. J. Emerson
ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Abundant Life Center
23790 I-30 N., Bryant
501-847-4357
Rev. Sam & Tami Crenshaw
Assembly of God
1020 East Grand, Haskell
Pastor: Jason Keisler
Benton First Assembly of God
1801 Hot Springs Hwy., Benton
501-778-7597
www.bentonfirst.com
Pastor: Rev. Gene Huskey
Calvary Assembly of God
3420 Military Rd., Benton
501-778-2884
Pastor: Randy Roach
www.calvarybenton.com
BAPTIST
Avilla Missionary Baptist Church
10582 Avilla Road West
501-316-1623
Pastor: Kirby Caple
Bethel Missionary Baptist
501 S. Border St., Benton
501-778-3396
Pastor: Bro. Carl Higgs
Berean Baptist Church
353 Jay St., Haskell
501-776-2571
Pastor: Larry Mattingly
Brooks Bethel Baptist Church
20020 S. Alexander Rd.,
501-557-5350
Pastor: Buddy Fowler
www.brooksbethelmbc.com
Calvary Baptist Church
612 Valley View Rd., Benton
501-778-4762
Pastor: Frank Thurman
www.cbcbenton.com
Celebration Baptist Church
4601 Hwy 229 in Haskell-Benton
Pastor: Allan Eakin
Congo Road Baptist Church
7193 Congo Road, Benton
501-794-3844
Pastor: Rev. Jeff Langley
www.congoroadbaptistchurch.org
Cross Bar C Cowboy Church
10895 Hwy. 70 - Exit 111
Pastor: Greg Spann
Cross Roads Missionary
Baptist Church
10019 Lily Dr., Benton
Pastor: Larry Campbell
Discover The Joy Baptist
410 S. East St., Benton
501-837-8058
Pastor: Perry Robinson
Eastside Baptist Church
Fifth & Hoover St., Benton
501-778-8443
Pastor: Steve Raines
Fairplay Missionary Baptist
8516 Fairplay Rd., Benton
Pastor: Kenny Mitchell
501-778-5755
First Baptist Church
211 S. Market St., Benton
778-2271/315-2270
Pastor: Rick Grant
www.fbcbenton.org
First Baptist Church (ABA)
401 N. Reynolds Rd., Bryant
501-847-0365 www.fbcbryant.net
Pastor: Phillip Miller
First Southern Baptist
604 S. Reynolds Rd., Bryant
501-847-3014
www.1stsouthern.org
Forest Hills Missionary Baptist
1119 Alcoa Rd., Benton
501-315-4403
Pastor: Marcus W. Blakley
Geyer Springs 1st Baptist Church
12400 Hwy I-30, Little Rock
501-455-3474 www.gsfbc.org
Pastor: Jeff Williams
Gospel Light Baptist
910 W. Hazel St., Benton
Grace Baptist Church
21941 I-30, Suite 10 Bryant
Pastor: Joel Prickett
501-249-0869
Gravel Hill Baptist Church
6259 Hwy 9
Benton, AR 72019
Pastor: Nathan Nalley
www.thechurchatgravelhill.com
Highland Heights Baptist
1421 Alcoa Rd., Benton
501-315-7204
Pastor: Bro. Brian Moore
Holland Chapel Baptist Church
15523 I-30, Benton
501-778-4546
Pastor: Jason Tallent
Hurricane Lake Baptist
2516 Springhill Rd., Bryant
501-847-2864
Pastor: Benny Grant
Indian Springs Baptist Church
23581 I-30, Bryant
501-847-2915
Pastor: Tom Williams
Kentucky Missionary Baptist
7070 Hwy. 5, Benton
Pastor: Rev. Donny Haynes
Landmark Missionary Baptist
215 E. Main St., Traskwood
Pastor: Rev. James Floyd
Lighthouse Baptist Church
4163 Salt Creek Rd.
Pastor: Morgan Flagler
Mars Hill Missionary
Baptist Church
128000 Mars Hill Road
Pastor: Rev. Davy McCool
Mountain View Missionary Baptist
1552 Mountain View Road,
Benton
Pastor: Phillip Batchelor,
501-909-9090
Mt. Olive Missionary Baptist
3700 Mount Olive Rd., Bauxite
Pastor: Doug Hammonds
Mt. Harmony Missionary Baptist
245 Mt. Harmony Dr.,
Haskell-Benton (off Hwy 229)
501-776-0821 Pastor: Ben Palmer
Mt. Vernon Baptist Church
5408 Alcoa Rd., Benton
Mulberry Missionary Baptist
5838 Salt Creek Rd., Benton
Pastor: Martin Lamb
New Friendship Missionary Baptist
7400 Friendship Rd., Benton
Interim Pastor Tyler Askew
501-317-0855
New Life Baptist Church
10765 Samples Rd., Alexander
501-316-1985
Pastor: Dr. Sid Sample
www.nlbcavilla.org
New Life Missionary Baptist
126 West Dr., Benton
Pastor: Rev. Scotty Nalley
New Prospect Missionary Baptist
Peeler Bend Rd.
Pastor: David Standridge
Oak Grove Missionary Baptist
2907 Congo Rd.
501-315-5279
Pastor: Vance Nutt
Old Union Baptist Church
12641 Hwy 298
501-794-2215
Pastor: Rev. Joseph Cornelison
Palestine Missionary Baptist
Hwy 35 S.
Pastor: Rev. J. Clyde Chenault
501-778-4177
Park Place Baptist Church
22208 I-30 N., Bryant
Pastor: Gary Lambright
Pleasant Hill Baptist Church
24310 N. Sardis Rd.
501-557-5153
Pastor: Rick Porter
Ridgecrest Baptist Church
900 Ridge Rd., Benton
501-778-6747 501-249-5049
Pastor: Bro. James Coward
Salem Baptist Church
3069 Salem Rd., Benton
501-316-5352
www.salem-baptist.com
Saline Missionary Baptist
8210 N. Main St., Tull
Pastor: Rev. Kim Hammer
Sharon Missionary Baptist
402 Shenandoah Dr., Benton
501-778-4103
Pastor: Richard Hamlin
Social Hill Missionary Baptist
2021 Hwy. 35 S., Benton
Pastor Bro. Bill Williams
Spring Creek Baptist
19200 I-30, Benton
Pastor: Dr. Terry Parrish
Springhill Missionary Baptist
8602 Springhill Rd. 501-316-1345
Pastor: Bro. Steven Sewell
501-455-1065 • 501-778-7270
SINCE 1957
Evans Auto Parts
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Benton, AR 72015
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BENTON AUTOMOTIVE
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1123 Highway 5 North • Benton
501-776-2292
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307 Office Park Dr. in Bryant
501.847.3200
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4500 Hwy 5 N. , Suite 6 • Bryant
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3300 Military Rd.,
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501-778-8282
Our philosophy is simple...
Focus on quality and results will follow.
This Directory is made possible by these businesses who encourage all of us to attend worship services.
The Church Listings are provided at no charge to our area churches in Saline county.
If your Church is not listed, please contact The Saline Courier at 315-8228 ext. 229 or email composing@bentoncourier.com
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St. Matthew’s Episcopal
Church
The annual Blessing of
the Animals sponsored by St.
Matthew’s Episcopal Church
will take place today, Oct.
12, as part of the activities
at Old-Fashioned Day in
Downtown Benton.
The event is set for 10 a.m.
on the courthouse lawn.
The Rev. Lorrie
Slaymaker, pastor of St.
Matthew’s, invites people of
all faiths to participate.
All types of pets are wel-
come, she said. She noted
that dogs should be leashed
and cats should be confined
to carriers.
Benton Foursquare
Church
“Pickin’, Grinnin’ and
Praise” (western night) is
scheduled from 7 to 9 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 5, at Benton
Foursquare Church, located
at Military and Thomas
roads.
Those attending are asked
to dress in western wear,
including cowboy/cowgirl
hats, bonnets, boots and
belts.
Participants are invited to
sing western songs, gospel
or non-gospel, if the songs
are suitable for families.
Western-style snacks
should be brought to the
event to be held in the
church fellowship hall.
The Rev. David Brewer is
pastor of the church.
St. Paul Missionary
Baptist Church
A citywide revival will be
held Oct. 16-18 at St. Paul
Missionary Baptist Church.
Services will begin at 7 p.m.
The speaker schedule will
be:
•Oct. 16, guest preacher
DeSean Jarrett, pastor of
St. John Baptist Church of
Lonoke.
•Oct. 17, guest preacher
Derick Easter, pastor of
Bailey Chapel Baptist Church
of North Little Rock.
•Oct. 18, guest preacher
Learthur Shelton, pastor
of Lampkin Chapel Baptist
Church.
Special music will be pre-
sented each night by guest
artists.
The Rev. Jefferson D.
Walker Jr. is pastor of the
church, which is at 1200
Dixie St. in Benton. Other
information is available by
calling 501-837-0745.
Cumberland Presbyterian
Fellowship
A weekly Bible study
will resume Wednesday
night at Cumberland
Presbyterian Fellowship,
3100 Marketplace in Bryant.
People of all faiths are
invited.
The study begins at 7 p.m.
and is led by
Other activities on Sunday
will include Bible study at 10
a.m. followed by the morning
worship service at 10:45.
A mid-week Bible study
is scheduled for 7 p.m.
Wednesday. The The Rev.
Jack Ryan, director of the
chaplaincy program for the
Veterans Administration
Hospital at Fort Roots in
North Little Rock and a chap-
lain in the Army Reserve, is
teaching the study.
Activities on Sunday will
include a 10 a.m. Bible study
led by Ryan followed by the
morning worship service at
10:45.
The Rev. Buster Guthrie is
pastor of the congregation.
Music for the services is
under the direction of Betty
Kettles, songleader, and
Lynda Hollenbeck, pianist.
**********************
The Saline Courier wel-
comes news from Saline
County churches.
Please send announcements
about special events to news@
bentoncourier.com.
Additional information is
available by contacting Josh
Briggs or Lynda Hollenbeck at
315-8228.
SALINE CHURCH EVENTS
VATICAN CITY -- The
Vatican put a German dio-
cese on notice Tuesday
that it disapproves of its
challenge to church teach-
ing on whether Catholics
who remarry can receive
Communion, saying the
issue will be discussed by
the whole church at a meet-
ing next year of the world's
bishops.
The diocese of Freiburg
issued an official set of
guidelines this week explain-
ing how such divorced and
remarried Catholics could
receive the sacrament. It
said if certain criteria are
met - if the couple was try-
ing to live according to the
faith and acted with laud-
able motivation - they could
receive Communion and
other sacraments of the
church.
Church teaching holds
that Catholics who don't
have their first marriage
annulled, or declared null
by a church tribunal, before
remarrying cannot par-
ticipate fully in the church's
sacraments because they are
essentially committing adul-
tery. The issue has vexed
the Vatican for decades
and has left generations of
Catholics feeling shunned by
their church.
Annulments are often dif-
ficult - if not impossible to
obtain - and can take years
to process when they do
come through.
But the Vatican said
Tuesday that Freiburg's
local initiative "risks caus-
ing confusion." It said the
issue will be discussed in
2014 at a major meeting of
bishops that was announced
Tuesday. And in a polite but
unsubtle jab at Freiburg's
one-off decision, the Vatican
issued a reminder that it
was "important to undertake
such a path in the full com-
munion of the church com-
munity."
Vatican cool to challenge
Associated Press
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Temple Baptist Church
8601 Hwy 67, Benton
778-1295
Temple Missionary Baptist
3215 Coats Rd., Benton
501-860-8907
Pastor: Rev. David Harris
Ten Mile Missionary Baptist
17510 Church Rd.
Lonsdale, AR 72087
(501) 939-2227
Bro. Wesley Howard
Trinity Baptist Church
702 Church St., Benton
501-778-9146
Pastor: Mike Titsworth
United Missionary Baptist
3810 Salem Rd.
501-794-2139
Tyndall Park Missionary Baptist
Corner of Cox and Hoover St.
501-993-9029
Pastor: Cecil Hyde
Vimy Ridge Immanuel Baptist
12214 Germania Rd.,
501-847-2322
Pastor Timothy Vanya
Vimy Ridge Missionary Baptist
14823 Vimy Ridge Road
Alexander, 455-2947
Pastor: Bro. Dennis Mitchell
Victory Baptist Church
5386 Hwy 67 S., Benton
501-315-5005
Pastor: Ken Graham
West Bauxite Miss. Baptist
5701 Hwy 183, Bauxite
501-557-5691
Pastor: Rev. Melvin Burris
Wright’s Chapel Baptist
2150 S. Market St., Benton
CATHOLIC
Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church
900 W. Cross St., Benton
Rev. Chinnaiah Irudayaraj
Yeddanapalli (Fr. YC)
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Northside Church of Christ
917 N. East St., Benton
501-315-1128
Pastor: Jim Gardner
New Bethel Church of Christ
3777 Kruse Loop, Alexander
501-794-1994
Church of Christ
305 East Smith St., Benton
501-317-5113 or 317-6900
Church of Christ
4232 Edison Ave., Bauxite
501-794-1604
Haskell Church of Christ
Haskell
501-315-0173
Hwy 5 Church of Christ
1500 Hwy 5 N.
Benton, AR 72019
501-303-0465
Evangelist James Hamilton
Highway Church of Christ
18514 I-30, Benton
501-315-3303
Pastor: Steven Ford
Johnson Street Church of Christ
101 W. Johnson St., Benton
501-315-9034 or 501-315-7896
Paron Church Of Christ
17212 Hwy 9, Paron
501-594-8373
River Street Church of Christ
415 River St., Benton
501-778-4042
Pastor: Bro. Dennis Gage
Salem Road Church of Christ
2700 Salem Rd.
501-316-1415
CHURCH OF GOD
Benton Pentecostal CoG
4023 Gattin Rd., Benton
501-778-8664
Pastors: Elizabeth & Dave Witt
Bryant Pentecostal Church of God
5094 Highway 5 North
Bryant, AR 72022
501-847-8140
Pastors: Henry Hunt & Ruth Hunt
Grape Chapel Church of God
7100 Hwy 298 (Kirk Rd.)
501-794-0206
Pastor: Scott L. Planck
www.gccog4u.com
New Life Church of God
Chambers Rd., Bauxite
501-249-3330 Pastor: Roy Willis
New Summit Church of God
3916 Silica Heights Rd., Benton
Pastor: Bryan Hughes
Walnut Street Church of God
520 W. Walnut
Benton, AR 72016
EPISCOPAL
St. Matthew’s Episcopal
1112 Alcoa Rd., Benton
501-315-1516
Priest Lorrie Slaymaker
www.stmatthewsar.org
LUTHERAN
First Lutheran Church
18181 I-30 S., Benton
Pastor: James D. Burns
Friends in Christ Lutheran Church
4305 Hwy 5 N., Bryant
501-213-6521
Pastor: Emil Woerner
www.bryantlutheran.com
Zion Lutheran Church
300 Avilla Road East
501-316-1100
Pastor: Michael Schleider
www.zionlutheranavilla.org
METHODIST
Benton First United Methodist
200 N. Market St., Benton
501-778-3601
Sr. Minister Rev. David Jones
www.fumcbenton.org
Bryant First United Methodist
508 N. Reynolds Rd., Bryant
501-847-0226
Pastor: Rev. Hamett Evans
www.fumcbryant.org
Congo United Methodist
2903 Steel Bridge Road
Pastor: Polly Burton
Ebenezer United Methodist
Church
8319 N. Main Tull
501-778-6242
Pastor Rev. Randy Reed
Mt. Carmel United Methodist
2005 Hwy 5, Benton
501-794-2451
Pastor: Rev. Bob Warlord
New Hope United Methodist
1705 New Hope Road, Benton
501-860-2302
Rev.Walt Garrett
Parkview United Methodist
514 Border St., Benton
501-778-2145
Pastor: Rev. Walt Garrett
www.pumcbenton.org
Salem United Methodist
1647 Salem Rd., Benton
501-316-2282
Pastor: Rev. Carlton Cross
Sardis United Methodist
10715 W. Sardis Rd., Bauxite
501-602-2129
Pastor: Rev. Stephen Dickinson
www.thesardischurch.net
Traskwood United Methodist
Hwy. 229 and Main Street.
Pastor: Danny Dunlap
www.traskwoodumc.org
NAZARENE
Cornerstone
Church of the Nazarene
25799 I-30, County Line Exit #126
501-653-2886
Pastor: Rev. Tim Evans
First Church of the Nazarene
1203 W. Sevier St., Benton
501-315-9600
Pastor: Rev. Brady Lane
PENTECOSTAL
First Pentecostal Church
16412 I-30, Benton 501-778-6974
Pastors: Rev. Burl Crabtree
and Bishop O.D. Crabtree
First Pentecostal Church
4212 Hwy 5 N., Bryant
Pastor: Rev. Jerry Whitley
Lawson Rd. Pentecostal Church
807 E. Lawson 501-821-3542
PRESBYTERIAN
Cumberland Presbyterian
Fellowship
3600 Market Place, Bryant
315-0355/888-4190
Pastor: Rev. Buster Guthrie
First Presbyterian Church
501 N. East St., Benton
501-315-7737
www.fpcbenton.com
Pastor: Rev. Dr. Dari Rowen
7th-DAY ADVENTIST
Seventh-Day Adventist
2615 Lincoln Rd., Benton
501-778-0641
Pastor: Michael Wolford
DISCIPLES OF CHRIST
First Christian Church
16218 I-30 at Pinewood Dr.,
Benton
Pastor: Rev. Joe Jorgensen
OTHER CHURCHES
Benton Foursquare Church
Military & Thomas Roads, Benton
501-315-2229
Pastor: Rev. David Brewer
Centerpoint Church
20383 I-30, in Benton
501-776-2570
Pastor: Rev. Pat Dezort
Christ Church
11800 Vimy Ridge Road
455-6275/455-1506
Pastor: G.A. & Joyce Dudley
Faith Fellowship
608 S. Marion, Benton
501-794-1683
Family Church
21815 I-30, Bryant
501-847-1559
Pastor: Rev. Perry Black
Fellowship Bible Church
5724 Alcoa Rd., Benton
501-315-1560
www.fbclr.org
First ChristianChurch
16218 interstate 30
501-778-8237
Pastor Joe Jorgensen
Gateway Church
1201 W. Longhills Road
501-680-9043
www.salinegateway.org
Grace Church
5205 W. Sawmill Rd.
501-804-0371
Pastor: Tommy Jones
www.thegracechurch.net
The Lighthouse Church
2800 Military Rd., Benton
Pastor: Barbara Allred
Midtowne Church
4037 Boone Rd, Benton
501-315-0992
Pastor: Doug Pruitt
Pleasant Hill AME Church
302 Reed St., Benton
Pastor: Rev. Byron Miller
Victory Fellowship
407 Prickett Rd., Bryant
501-847-1855
www.victoryfellowshiplr.com
World Bibleway Fellowship
1214 Liberty St., Benton
Pastor: Rev. Hank Smith
This Directory is made possible by these businesses who encourage all of us to attend worship services.
The Church Listings are provided at no charge to our area churches in Saline county.
If your Church is not listed, please contact The Saline Courier at 315-8228 ext. 229 or email composing@bentoncourier.com
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The Saline
“For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the
LORD, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you,
plans to give you hope and a future. Then you will
call upon me and come and pray to me, and I will
listen to you. You will seek me and find me when
you seek me with all your heart.”
Jeremiah 29:11-13 (NIV)
There is a Yiddish saying
about the mysteries of faith,
family and fellowship that,
loosely translated, proclaims:
“You can-
not make
Shabbat by
yourself.”
“The
point is
that you
need the
presence of
other Jews
around
you to live
out the
dictates of
your Jewish
beliefs,”
said sociologist Steven M.
Cohen of the Jewish Institute
of Religion at Hebrew Union
College.
Shabbat creates that
circle of support. Beginning
minutes before sundown
on Friday, it involves a
day of rest, prayer, ritual
feasting and ties that bind.
Some of these traditions are
defined by faith while oth-
ers are rooted in ethnicity
and culture. But the whole
ancient package assumes
that Shabbat brings Jews
together.
So what does it mean
when the first major study
of American Jews in more
than a decade shows that
-- even among Jews who call
themselves religious -- only
33 percent believe being part
of a Jewish community is
“essential to being Jewish”?
Only 23 percent of these
“Jews by religion” consid-
ered it essential to follow
Jewish laws.
The results in this Pew
Research Center study
were, of course, even more
sobering among the rising
number of Jews -- one in five
-- who said they had “no reli-
gion at all.”
“In theory, Jews who
answer ‘none’ when asked
about their religion can still
be part of the wider Jewish
community. There’s nothing
new about that,” said Cohen
in a telephone interview.
In practice, however, this
“none” trend is viewed as
negative by many Americans
who consider the practice of
Judaism to be a crucial part
of Jewish identity, he said.
Thus, the rising number of
Jewish “nones” has many
of the same serious implica-
tions as the much-discussed
national rise in the number
of religiously unaffiliated
among people in general.
This national survey of
Jews, by Pew’s Religion and
Public Life Project, is the
first conducted by an insti-
tution outside the Jewish
community. Jewish surveys
in recent decades have con-
sistently caused controversy
because of fierce debates
about how to define who is,
and who is not, Jewish.
Among its headline-grab-
bing findings, this survey
noted:
-- The percentage of
adults who are “Jews by
religion” has declined by
about half since the 1950s.
While 93 percent of “G.I.
Generation” Jews call
themselves religious Jews,
only 68 percent of young
“Millennial” Jews make that
claim.
-- Only 15 percent of
those surveyed said being
Jewish is “mainly a matter
of religion,” as opposed to
62 percent who said Jewish
identity is primarily about
ancestry and culture. Two-
thirds said it isn’t necessary
for Jews to believe in God.
-- Among “Jews of no reli-
gion,” 79 percent have a non-
Jewish spouse, compared to
36 percent of religious Jews.
This is crucial, since 96 per-
cent of Jews married to Jews
raise their children in the
faith, while only 20 percent
of intermarried Jews do so.
And Orthodox Jews continue
to have much higher birth-
rates than other Jews.
In addition to raising
demographic questions
about the future, the grow-
ing divide between secular
and religious Jews can cause
sparks in daily life, said
Naomi Zeveloff of the Jewish
Daily Forward. In a recent
article, she noted that when
Chabad-Lubavitch activists
go “bageling” -- approaching
New Yorkers to ask if they
are Jewish -- they have an
unusual way of verifying that
they are on target.
One “surefire way” to
know someone is Jewish,
she wrote, is that “they react
to your question with anger,”
like one subway rider who
replied, “I’m not religious”
when approached by Jews in
typically Orthodox garb.
“If you are a secular Jew,
anything goes,” said Zeveloff
in a telephone interview.
“Many secular Jews assume
that religious Jews, especial-
ly the Orthodox, don’t think
they are Jewish enough and
that their Judaism is some-
how invalid or inferior.”
Jewish community
leaders, said Cohen, must
face a growing hole in the
middle of American Jewry as
“nones” surge on one side,
and the Orthodox hold firm
on the other. However, they
can take comfort in the fact
that Jews have “invented
new ways to be Jewish”
through the ages.
“You can be Jewish by
being religious, but you can
also say that you are a Jew
because your politics are
liberal,” he said. “We have
Zionists. We have secular
Zionists and we have reli-
gious Zionists, we have
left-wing Zionists and we
have right-wing Zionists. ...
Judaism has always been a
kind of cottage industry.”
Terry Mattingly is the director
of the Washington Journalism
Center at the Council for
Christian Colleges and
Universities and leads the
GetReligion.org project to
studyreligion and the news.
THE HOLE IN THE MIDDLE OF AMERICAN JEWRY
TERRY
MATTINGLY
ON
RELIGION
12 The Saline Courier
Saturday, October 12, 2013
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WASHINGTON — Janet
Yellen, the White House’s
choice to lead the Federal
Reserve starting next year,
is known as a meticulous
perfectionist, an unusually
accurate prognosticator and
a firm believer in the use of
Fed policy to reduce unem-
ployment.
She also owns a substan-
tial stamp collection. She
met her future husband in
the Fed’s cafeteria. And in
graduate school, she took
such precise notes that they
later became a textbook of
sorts for future students.
Here’s a look at the public
and private Yellen:
A SHARP FORECASTER
In the nearly 12 years that
Yellen has expressed her
views in statements and pol-
icy meetings and provided
economic forecasts, she’s
built an enviable batting
average.
From the damage that
a bursting housing bubble
could cause the U.S.
economy to the steps the
Fed needed to take to fight
the Great Recession, Yellen
often saw more accurately
into the future than many
others. Transcripts of the
Fed’s policy meetings docu-
ment the trend.
One example: In
December 2007, the Fed’s
official forecast was for con-
tinued growth. Yellen was
unconvinced. The transcripts
show she pushed her col-
leagues to take unusually
aggressive action against the
threat of a downturn. She
lost the argument. The Fed
approved a small quarter-
point cut in a key short-term
interest rate rather than the
bolder half-point cut Yellen
favored.
“Any more bad news
could put us over the edge,
and the possibility of getting
bad news — in particular,
a significant credit crunch
— seems far from remote,”
Yellen argued.
December 2007, it later
turned out, was the month
when the Great Recession
officially began. Less than
a year later, the financial
system was engulfed by its
worst financial crisis in 70
years.
THE PRIVATE AND
PUBLIC SIDE
Shy and quiet outside the
classroom. Firm and direct
when making a point in
class.
That’s how former stu-
dents and colleagues recall
Professor Janet Yellen, who
spent more than a quarter
century teaching econom-
ics at the Haas School of
Business at the University of
California, Berkeley.
When Victor d’Allant took
Yellen’s introduction to mac-
roeconomics class in 1986,
his first impression was of a
“tiny” woman facing down a
room of 125 opinionated stu-
dents. Many were eager to
challenge her on economic
theory. Yet d’Allant recalls
that Yellen would disarm
her most forceful intellectual
antagonists with confidence
and the ability to reason.
“She was always very
good about staying calm,”
d’Allant said. “She said,
‘Let’s think about this care-
fully.’ That is an art that not
so many professors have,
not so many professionals
have. To force this other per-
son to go deeper into their
thinking and understand the
consequences of their think-
ing.”
FROM STAMPS TO
STOCKS
Yellen and her husband,
Nobel Prize-winning econo-
mist George Akerlof, have
held a mix of big-company
stocks and investment funds
in a trust.
And they share a fondness
for stamps.
The two held between $4
million and $13 million in
assets as of Yellen’s financial
disclosure report for 2012.
Their stamp collection was
valued at between $15,000
and $50,000
Their individual stock
holdings included Conoco
Phillips, DirecTV Group, E.I.
DuPont, Pfizer, Office Max
and Raytheon.
Through the University
of California, they also hold
retirement accounts in funds
invested in bonds, stocks
and insurance company con-
tracts.
In addition, Yellen
and Akerlof receive pay-
ments from a University
of California pension, or
defined benefit plan. And
Yellen owns retirement
funds managed by TIAA-
CREF dating to her days
as an assistant professor at
Harvard in the 1970s.
Last year, Yellen earned
$179,700 from the Fed. As
chairman, she would be paid
$199,700, the same as for a
Cabinet secretary.
AN ACADEMIC STAR
Yellen is familiar with
success. Born in Brooklyn,
N.Y., in 1946, she grew up
with a father was a family
doctor who worked from the
ground floor of their home.
Her mother was an elemen-
tary school teacher who quit
work to take care of Janet
and her older brother.
Yellen graduated as vale-
dictorian from her public
high school, then summa
cum laude from Brown
University with an econom-
ics degree in 1967. Four
years later, she earned a
Ph.D. from Yale University.
At Yale, Yellen became a
legend of sorts. At least her
class notes did. The Yellen
Notes, as they became
known, served as an unoffi-
cial textbook for generations
of graduate students study-
ing economics at Yale.
A mentor at Yale, the late
Nobel laureate James Tobin,
once said of Yellen, “She has
a genius for expressing com-
plicated arguments simply
and clearly.”
LOVE IN THE
CAFETERIA
Yellen not only found
career satisfaction at the
Fed. She also met her future
husband in the cafeteria.
In 1977, she was a staff
economist at the Fed in
Washington and Akerlof was
a visiting economist. After
they married the following
June, they began a long and
highly successful partner-
ship that produced numer-
ous academic papers while
both taught at Berkeley.
“We liked each other
immediately and decided to
get married,” Ackerlof wrote
in essay published when he
won the Nobel Prize in 2001.
“Not only did our personali-
ties mesh perfectly, but we
have always been in all but
perfect agreement about
macroeconomics.”
Yellen revisited the Fed’s
cafeteria when she returned
to Washington as one of
seven Fed board members
in the 1990s. She took her
lunches there as a way to
subvert the hierarchical
system that limited contact
between top Fed officials
and hundreds of staff econo-
mists.
“It was a real cultural
shock,” remembers Kevin
Hassett, a staff economist
at the time. “There was a
serious bureaucratic divide
between the political appoin-
tees and the staff. She found
a way around that.”
CONSENSUS BUILDER
Yellen’s supporters say
one of her main advantages
over her chief rival for the
Fed post, former Treasury
Secretary Lawrence
Summers, was this: She’s
been able to build consensus
among the seven Fed board
members and 12 regional
bank presidents who meet
eight times a year to set
interest-rate policies.
They note, for example,
that Yellen moved the Fed,
after years of discussion, to
endorse a statement of infla-
tion policy. In the statement,
the Fed for the first time
agreed in January 2012 to an
inflation target of 2 percent
It was something
Chairman Ben Bernanke
had long advocated. But it
had been resisted by other
officials who feared setting
too rigid a goal.
The statement was devel-
oped by a communication
committee Yellen led. It gave
equal weight to the Fed’s
other mandate: to foster
maximum employment.
Princeton economist Alan
Blinder, a former Fed vice
chair, said he was amazed
that Yellen could forge such
an agreement after years in
which officials had debated
the issues.
“It was a testament to her
ability to listen to different
points of view and arrive at a
consensus,” Blinder said.
What you might not know about
Obama’s choice for Federal Reserve Chair
Associated Press Minn. — After more than
a week in action, is a key
feature of President Barack
Obama's health care over-
haul a success or a bust?
Judging by the dearth of
data, it's virtually impossible
to say.
The federal government
has released no comprehen-
sive data on how many peo-
ple have enrolled for health
insurance using federally
run exchanges, the online
marketplaces being used
in 36 states for residents to
compare and buy insurance.
In the 14 states running
their own exchanges, the
situation isn't much better.
As a result, a nation
obsessed with keeping score
to determine winners and
losers is finding it difficult to
pass immediate judgment on
a law that will in large part
define the president's legacy.
"Obamacare has a lot of
cynics in this country, and it
needs to get off to a better
start than what we see so
far if it's going to be a suc-
cess," said Bob Laszewski,
a Washington, D.C.-based
health care industry consul-
tant.
Laszewski suspects the
lack of data conceals an
extremely slow start thanks
to widely reported technical
problems.
MNsure, Minnesota's
online insurance market-
place, reported more than
10,000 accounts had been
initiated as of Thursday,
said April Todd-Malmlov,
the exchange's director. But
enrollment figures won't be
available until Wednesday.
She said some users inad-
vertently submitted multiple
applications that need to be
consolidated.
Similar problems abound.
Many states running their
own exchanges haven't
released initial enrollment
data, and only a handful are
providing a detailed picture
of applicants and the plans
they are choosing.
Oregon, another state that
embraced the law, hasn't
even opened enrollment
because its software can't
determine eligibility for
Medicaid or for tax credits
that help pay for insurance.
Vermont's system is so
buggy that officials are issu-
ing paper applications, even
though the thinly populated
state received $171 mil-
lion — among the largest
amounts in federal grants
— to run its exchange and
upgrade technology.
The U.S. Department of
Health and Human Services,
which is overseeing the
federally run exchanges,
doesn't expect to release
enrollment data until mid-
November. But scattered
reports from those states
aren't encouraging. For
example, Delaware had yet
to confirm a single enroll-
ment by Thursday, and
many Florida groups desig-
nated to help people sign up
say they still can't complete
the enrollment process
online.
The Obama administra-
tion has worked feverishly to
fix the website delays, frozen
screens and other glitches
that they attributed to the
high level of consumer inter-
est, not software or design
issues. But independent
experts said it's probably
a combination of all those
factors, noting that a high
volume of users tends to
expose software issues unde-
tected by testing.
The federal exchanges,
for instance, require users to
create accounts before they
can browse for insurance
plans, adding to website
volume. Most e-commerce
sites, and several state-run
health insurance market-
places, allow consumers to
window shop without an
account. An HHS spokes-
woman said the agency
required consumer accounts
so people would know
whether they were eligible
for subsidies before shop-
ping.
Data is coming from
insurance companies in
some states, though it
largely shows only a trickle
of enrollment. Those include
Vantage Health Plan, one
of four companies offering
plans through Louisiana's
exchange that reported
enrolling 12 people, and
CoOportunity Health, which
reported five enrollees in
Iowa and nine in Nebraska
as of mid-week.
One major exception is
Kentucky, where 18,351
people had enrolled by
Wednesday. Despite
relentless criticism from
Kentucky Republican Sens.
Mitch McConnell and Rand
Paul, Democratic Gov.
Steve Beshear has been an
enthusiastic adopter of the
Affordable Care Act. He
believes providing medical
coverage can only benefit a
state that ranks among the
worst in nearly every health
measure.
"These people are our
friends and neighbors,"
Beshear said. "They roll the
dice and pray they don't get
sick."
Kentucky is among the
few states that have released
information about enrollees,
such as their age, family size
or employment status. Also
largely unknown is what
types of coverage are being
purchased: lower-end plans
with affordable premiums
but high deductibles, or
more expensive plans with
lower deductibles?
A few other state-run
exchanges have reported
early activity, with the leader
being New York, where
40,000 applicants processed
by Wednesday. In California,
the nation's most populous
state, 16,300 applications had
been completed by Tuesday
— but that was less than in
Kentucky, a state with one-
tenth the number of unin-
sured people than California.
But industry insiders
say the enrollment system
is starting to work more
smoothly.
ACA a success so far? It’s hard to say
Associated Press
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Gravel
Fill
SB-2
Topsoil
Sandy Loam
Sands
Donnafill
Pick-Up
or
Delivery
Build & Remodel
35 Years Experience
10% Sr.Citizens Discount
We Do It All!
Large or Small
Remodel • Add Ons
Roofs Metal/Shingles
References Provided
939-2217
Southfork
Construction
Parish 
Construction
BUILDING AND
REMODELING
*31 yrs experience
Small or Large
Jobs Done to
Your Satisfaction
tFree Estimates
tReasonable
Prices
Licensed
501-231-9230
501-316-2994
Carpentry
EXPERIENCED
CARPENTER
- Out of Work -
Home Maintenance
& Remodeling
of All Kinds
Vinyl Siding Installation
Call TIM
778-5171
OVER 30 YEARS
EXPERIENCE
- Free Estimates -
No job too LARGE
or small
Satisfaction Guaranteed!
DAVID BURTON, SR.
794-2563
Classifieds Work!
Chimney Cleaning
Royal
Flush
Servicing
Central Arkansas
since 1988
316-1536
Chimney Cleaning
Insured for
Your Protection
Rusty “Rooster”
Pelton - Owner
Computer Services
A-1 COMPUTER
REPAIR
A+
Certified
Repair
Technician
•Desktop /Laptop
Repairs & Cleanup
•Virus-Spyware Removal-
Starting at $80.
1200 Ferguson Dr.
Ste. 5 • Benton
501-776-7577
Drywall Repair
DRYWALL
REPAIR
SERVICE
• Cracks & Holes
• Discolored Ceilings
• Water Stains
• Small Remodels
Valid References
40 Yrs. Experience
!!!!!!
Steve Burrow - Owner
337–4525
Handgun Classes
Arkansas
Concealed
Permit Class
George Brooks, Instructor
License No. 12-763
501.413.2393
email:
georgebrookstheshooter@gmail.com
website:
www.georgebrookstheshooter.com
3470 Quapaw Rd., Benton
Advanced Shooting instruction available
Time to get your own
place? Check out the
Rental Section in to-
day!s Classifieds...
Handgun Classes
CONCEALED
HANDGUN
CLASSES
Course completed
in one day.
All
paperwork
provided.
Tim Bragg, Instructor
#95-055
501-776-7419
Handyman
W::: ur
Hz×nvmz×
Tree trimming
!""#$%&
Bush & garden
trim & clean up
Brick
Junk hauling
Decks
Flower Bed
clean out
Block
Stump Grinding
Leaf Blowing
Painting
Any Yard Work!
FREE
ESTIMATES!
Owner
Deanna Massey
O×r Cz:: Dors I1
A:: Lzw×cznrt
501-326-2839
and ask for
Damon Massey
Horses
Clinic’s Certified
HOLTZMAN
Riding Academy, LLC
BIRTHDAY PARTIES
10 & UNDER
FREE COLT STARTING CLINIC
316-1141
Looking for love in all
the wrong places????
Check out the Freebie
section in today!s
classifieds. You will
fi nd uncondi ti onal
love there FREE!
Furry & Free!!
Landscaping
L.W. Lawn &
Landscaping
Services, LLC
www.lwlawnandlandscaping.com
lwlawnandlandscaping@yahoo.com
501-350-9137
870-942-9641
fax 501-847-6683
Lawn Maintenance, Trimming,
Sprinkler Installation, French
Drains, Shrub & Tree Pruning,
Leaf Removal, Landscaping,
Gutter Maintenance and more
But my God shall supply all your
needs according to his riches in
glory by Christ Jesus.
Phil. 4:19
Lawn Care
Richard
May’s
Lawn Care
10 years Local
Experience
Average yard:
Cut & Weed
Eat $25-$30
317-8966
316-6655
Flawless
Lawns
Flawless
Lawns
Spring Clean-Up
Leaves, Beds & Mulch
Mowing, Trimming, Edging
Odd Jobs and Light Hauling
Ryan Harmon 860-8789
MaRK 8:36
Painting
SUPERIOR
PAINTING
Satisfaction Guaranteed
!"#$%&'((")*+*,-"
& Repair
!".+/0$*1$"2"34/0$*1$
!""504/6$0
!"7$0,,6$0"8',-*+9
FREE ESTIMATES
INSURED
Kelly Hill – Owner
501.840.1470
501.316.3328
Painting
Pressure Wash-
!"#$
!"#$$%"#&'($)&*&+,"#
-#./&0#1(2"
3#4.#$
5%66#"&78#(4249
:(;4&<#"=2.#
(4>&+,"#
%&'()*+(*,'%
Roofng
ROOFING
Wagner
Residential
Commercial
&
VOTED
“Best of the Best”
2009
Free Estimates
847-6630
ARKANSAS SERVICE CO.
Roofing & Waterproofing
YRS %XPERIENCEsFREE Estimates
501.425.2995
Toll Free 877.942.1977
Senior & Veteran Discounts
Roofng
K & L
ROOFING
• Don’t Wait For
Roofing Repair
• All Insurance
Claims Welcome
• 40 years exp.
• Financing Avail.
w/approved credit
Upgrade to a metal roof with
a class 4 fire rating & you
may qualify for a discount on
your homeowners insurance
501-249-7735
501-778-7600
210 W. SEVIER
ST. • BENTON
Tree Service
M00ߣ
ñFF0ßßñ8l£
Tߣ£ 8£ß¥l8£
501-778-8071
501-860-5911
28-Years
Experience
Insured &
Licensed
*Stump Grinding
*Take Downs
*Trimming
*Pruning
*Storm Cleanup
CRITES
& TACKETT
TREE SERVICE
~ Free Estimates ~
Workman's Comp
& Liability Insured
•Stump Removal
501-337–1565
501-337-9094
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Tree Service
Parsons & Son
Tree Service LLC
“The Total Package”
Call us about
Tree Health Care
º 1rinning
º 1ake Lowns
º Pruning
º Renovals
º Stunp Renoval
º lirewood
º Oreen vaste lauling
Conplete
lnsuranoe Coverage
Owned 8 Operated
by an
lSA Lioensed Arborist
SO·L"PGA
840-1436
602-2959
Let the
Courier Classifieds
work for you.
Call Cathy or Kim
to place your
Classified Ad.
Mon.-Fri. 8am-5pm
315-8228
or come by
321 N. Market St.
Looking for a good
deal? Search the
Courier Classifieds!!
Tree Service
501.317.6788
ROCKIN B
TREE SERVICE
B
TRIMMING
PRUNING
STUMP GRINDING
REMOVALS
large & small
FREE ESTIMATES
Insured for
Your Protection
Excellent Clean up
Senior and
Military Discounts
available
Check out the
Garage Sales
this week!
Service Directory
Living Room To Go! Sofa, Love Seat, 2 End Tables,
Coffee Table, Rug and 2 Lamps
Mon.-Fri.
10-6
Sat. 10-4
“Arkansas’ Original & Leading Mattress Warehouse”
My Furniture Warehouse
3614 Marketplace Avenue, Suite 5 • Bryant
premieremedicalsupplyinc@yahoo.com
Offce: 501-847-7800
Fax: 501-847-7804
• Power Wheel Chairs • Back and Knee Braces
• Diabetic Supplies • Hospital Beds
Serving all of Arkansas 24/7
Janet Friday
Order#: 55-167015 DDS Dentures
55-167015 05 jf
$
39 $
395
per
set
Per Tooth
$100.
00
off
Any
Immediate
Denture Set!
1-DAY
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
STARTING AT JUST
$
395 pet Set
WITH WARRANTY
CROWNS
STARTING AT JUST
$
695
Per Unit
FREE
X-RAY
WITH THE PURCHASE
OF AN EXAM
$65 Value
Expires in 30 days
866-217-9901
23239 I-30 Bryant, AR www.denturesbryant.com
Invest in your quality of life
EXTRACTIONS
STARTING AT JUST
$
39 Per Tooth
With Denture Purchase
Auto
*
Home
*
Life
*
Commercial
507 Oak Hill Road
P.O. Box 1530
Benton, AR 72018
Phone: 501.315.3118
Fax: 501.860.6187
sales@insladies.com
Dale Miller and Kellie Sturm
Agents
Business & service Directory
Saturday, October 12, 2013
The Saline Courier - Page 13
get ready for football season
with the best deal in town.
$
29-3 mos. •
$
53-6 mos. •
$
95 year • Wknd.Only
$
30-6 mos. •
$
55 year
Don’t miss a play.... Subscribe Today! 501-315-8228
Sa
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e
Classifieds
PLACE AN AD
FIND AN AD
Listings are divided by category.
To get your ad in the Courier,
call 501-315-8228 Monday
through Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.,
online at bentoncourier.com,
come by the offce at 321 N.
Market St. in Benton or mail
to: PO Box 207, Benton,AR
72018. We accept Visa,
MasterCard, Discover, and
American Express.
WHEN TO CALL
FOR ADS APPEARING | CALL BEFORE
Tuesday –––––––––––– Mon Noon
Wednesday –––––––––– Tues. Noon
Thursday ––––––––––– Weds. Noon
Friday –––––––––––––– Thurs. Noon
Saturday –––––––––––– Thurs. Noon
Sunday ––––––––––––– Fri. Noon
Monday –––––––––––– Fri. Noon
GET ONLINE
WHAT
IT
COSTS
YARD
SALES
4 lines – 3 days – $18.68*
4 lines – 7 days – $29.28*
4 lines – 14 days – $ 45.44*
Extra lines available
4 lines – 2 days – $15.64*
4 lines – 3 days – $18.48*
Extra lines available
Cost includes ad and yard
sale packet including signs.
You can place your ad
on our website....
bentoncourier.com
Just go to website and
follow the steps.
Email us at:
class@bentoncourier.
com
}
}
}
}
}
*Price doesn’t include charge for graphic, TMC
rate, or internet. Price is subject to change.
Page 14 – The Saline Courier
class@bentoncourier.com Saturday, October 12, 2013
Garage Sales
Y
A
R
D
S
A
L
E
HURRICANE LAKE
ESTATES
Neighborhood
YARD SALE
Saturday
October 12
8am-Noon
Rain Date Sat., Oct. 19
We’re handing out tips and treats to help you
enjoy a safe and happy Halloween!
Halloween Safety Page
2x2 Ad in Full Color!
$40.00
Publishes Oct. 30
Deadline Oct. 26
Let us include
you in our special page
Call Today
315-8228
S
A
M
P
L
E
118 Valderrama (exit 114)
Fri 7-2 Sat 7-12 Name
Brand G(24-2T & AS-AM)
B(YL-AM) Electronics Wii
access, sheets, bks, golf
clubs
4014 EDGEWATER
Dr. Coldwater Creek
Subdivision. Saturday
Oct. 12, 7am - ?
4030 HERMITAGE
Dr. Fri, Sat, & Sun!
7a-2p, Multi fam, HH,
cothing, kids & etc
4033 Robinwood Cir,
Sat. 7a-?, Multi Fam,
Baby items, HH, Furn
Lawncare, & etc
5900 FAIRPLAY Rd.
Exit 106 2 Miles Sat
7a-2p Tires, jeep
seats, boat stuff, HH,
carport full of misc.
7519 PEACH Blos-
som 3 Family Fri &
Sat 8a-12p Furn LR &
DR Sui tes, Baby
items NB-2T, Toys,
Household Items
805 CEDAR Dr. Fri &
Sat. 8a-3p Antiques,
Furn, Misc. Cash
Only
806 CANTERBURY
Fri 8a-6p & Sat
8a-12p Infant to large
si ze men/womens
clothes, HH, & tools.
ANOTHER
MAN'S TREASURE
Wed-Sat/ 10am-6pm
Sunday/ 1pm-6pm
Across from
Old Reynolds Plant
Bauxite
501-557-5565
J&S STORAGES
across from the Baux-
ite Cutoff Road off of
Hwy 35 Storage clear
out Sale Sat. 7:30a-?
Arbonne, furn., home
decor, toys, Hallow-
een, little girls clothes
NB-6yrs, ladies &
mens clothing, dirt
bi ke, 20” wheel s
w/tires, hunting gear,
& lots more!
LG GARAGE Sale Fri
& Sat, 6:30a-4:30p,
213 S. Conrad, Furn,
clothes, everything
MULTI FAM Garage
sale Fri & Sat 7a-11a
4417 Mandy circle
(emerald valley sub)
MULTI FAM, Sat only
8a-12p, HH, & much
more 544 Northgate,
Northgate Subdivsion.
1312 PINEWOOD Dr.
Brownwood Subd. Sat.
8a-12p 2 Fam. Furn,
Toys, Clths, Cedar toy
chest, small appl.
303 MADRID Benton, Fri
& Sat, Golf clubs, baby &
adult clothes, Wii, baby
items, board games
3409 PELTON Rd
Fri Sat 7a Huge Sale
Furn, Lg Rugs, Decor,
HH, Seasonal, Toys,
Clothes, Antiques
600 MILLER Cove
Sat . John Deere Rid-
i ng Lawn Mower,
Cr af t sman wor k
bench, gas edger,
weed eater, l eaf
blower, leaf sweeper,
Antique Radio/Record
player, Niloak, Snow
Village, clothes, &
Household items
5918 Riveria Dr. Hur-
ricane Lake Estates.
Sat. 8a-12p Largest
Fishing equip Ever!
Reels, Rods, Lures.
Bikes & accs. Golf, of-
fice, baby bed, stroll-
ers, Tools, Ping pong
table, Rain date 10/19
Slightly early birds ok.
MOVING SALE Rain
or Shine 4120 Scenic
Mountain Dr. Sat.
8a-12 Furn, Mirrors,
Chri st mas Decor,
Patio Furn, Family
Clthg, & misc.
Bryant
516 B South Street
Sat 8a-2p Sun 10a-2p
Furn, HH, jewelry,
clothes, ant. armoire
w/ dresser & more!
Freebies
FREE, 2 Geese,
1 fem Mallard Duck,
Electric wheelchair
needs batteries,
50-315-0322
Health & Beauty
30-80% OFF Pre-
scription Drugs! Wide
range of Products &
Services. Licensed
Pharmacists Avail.
For Consult. Able to
fulfill ALL of your Pre-
scr i pt i ons. CALL
1-800-267-2688 NOW
for info
www.TotalCareMart.com
Health Services
CANADA DRUG
CENTER Safe and af-
fordable medications.
Save up to 75% on
your medi cat i on
n e e d s C a l l
1-800-304-6217
$10.00 off first pre-
scription and FREE
Shipping
Employment
ADON NEEDED Must
be RN to apply. Full
time position with
benefits available.
Insurance & Vacation
Please apply in per-
son at: 113 South Bri-
arwood, Sheridan,AR.
AT HOME CARE
OF ARKANSAS
seeking non-medical
caregivers & CNA's for
our senior care registry.
We provide in-home
careto the elderly. Must
have 2+yrs. exp. & clean
background record.
Leave info:
501-472-7585
Customer Service
Representative
needed for local
Insurance Company
Will be responsible for
answering phone assist-
ing clients making phone
calls and appointments for
agent. Skills needed are
Multi-Line phones and
computer . Spanish
speaking is a plus.
Please send resumes to
PO Box 625 • Benton AR
72018 • Attn: HR Dep
DENTAL OFFICE
needs employee
for 3 days a week.
Dental exp. is a plus
but all resumes will be
considered. Send
resume to: PO Box
338 Bryant,AR
72089-0338
EXPERIENCED
COOK/WAITSTAFF
CALL HOME PLATE
DINER ASK FOR
RICK 813-4423
Employment
FLAKEBOARD
MALVERN MDF
Malvern, AR
Flakeboard America,
Mal vern MDF, i s
seeking highly moti-
vated individuals to
work in full-time entry
level production posi-
tions at our Malvern
MDF facility. Appli-
cants must possess a
high school diploma
or G.E.D., have a sta-
ble work history and
clean background. In-
dustrial experience
preferred. Successful
candidates will be
able to work rotating
shifts, including week-
ends and holidays in
a production environ-
ment. Drug screening
and backgr ound
checks are manda-
t or y. Fl akeboar d
Ameri ca provi des
competitive pay and
comprehensive bene-
fit packages. Benefit
eligibility begins on
first day of employ-
ment. Applications ac-
cepted from October
10-16, 2013 at Flake-
board, 1275 Wi l -
lamette Road, Mal-
vern, AR 72104. !No
phone calls please.
Equal Opportuni ty
Employer
Grams House
Now Hiring
TEACHERS
Health & Life
Insurance, Retirement
Call Melba or Jessica
501-794-4726
HELP WANTED!!!
Make $1000 weekly
mai l i ng brochures
from HOME! NO ex-
perience required-
Start Immediately!
www.TheMailingHub.com
INVENTORY SPECIALIST
Responsible for man-
aging all aspects of
I nvent ory Cont rol
throughout our facility.
This includes cycle
counti ng, Kanban,
data entry, physical
inventory and other
duties as assigned.
Two/Four year col-
lege degree or 3-5
years of experience in
a manufacturing envi-
ronment preferred.
Working knowledge of
MRP, TCM, SAP or
other ERP systems a
plus. Interested candi-
dates should e-mail
their resume and sal-
ary history to mlo-
bel@dlminc.net
MIG WELDERS
Must have a minimum
2 years MIG welding
exp.with references
and be able to pass a
welding test. Pay
package i ncl udes:
competitive starting
wage, 401-K, health &
dental insurance, paid
vacation. Apply in
person at DLM,
10912 Highway 270
East, Malvern. Take
exit 99 off I-30 right to
our door. DLM is an
EOE.
Multiple Openings!
AP/AR - SALES
- DATA ENTRY -
ASST LEASING MGR -
WORD PROCESSOR (45K)
2 years min exp req'd.
Email resume:
melissa@employ
ment-solution.com
Multiple Openings!
MAs - LPNs - RNs
-MEDICAL BILLERS -
CODERS - FRONT DESK
(LR/Benton/Bryant)
2 years min exp req'd.
Email resume:
pamw@employment-
solution.com
Ready to take the
Real Estate Plunge?
Check out the Homes
for Sale in the Classi-
fieds daily.
Employment
TAX SCHOOL
Earn extra income
after course.
Benton & Bryant call
501-847-7774
No Tuition!
TECHNOLOGY SALES &
COPY & PRINT Associ-
a t e s n e e d e d .
Part-time. Flexible
hours. Apply in per-
son: Office Depot.
1621 Military Rd.
Business
Opportunities
GPS TRACKING Af-
filiation Program
Turnkey Operation,
BE YOUR OWN
BOSS! Join Multi-Bil-
lion $$$ industry!
125k+ Fi rst Year
Pr of i t Pot ent i al
W/Daily Residual In-
come Full Training
Capital Investment
Req.Only $4,995
Call 1-877-556-9872
ext.3005
(This is NOT a job op-
portunity)
Instruction
AIRLINES ARE HIR-
ING – Train for hands
on Aviation Mainte-
nance Career. FAA
approved program.
Housing and Finan-
cial aid for qualified
students –CALL Avia-
tion Institute
of Mai nt enance
1-800-335-9129
Child Care
CHILDCARE
Infants to 5 B •L• S
Vouchers
562-0691 • 951-2923
6:30a -5:30p
IN-HOME DAYCARE
Spotless - Non-smoking
Drop-ins Welcome!
778-2920
Services
CALL EMPIRE To-
day® to schedule a
FREE in-home esti-
mate on Carpeting &
Flooring.Call Today!
1-800-858-0126
SEE THE SATELLITE
TV Difference Pack-
ages as LOW as
$19.99/month! FREE
DVR Upgrade. FREE
HD Upgrade. FREE
Professional Installa-
tion! Call NOW and
Start SAVING!
1-866-725-5135
STOP MORTGAGE &
Mai ntenance Pay-
ments TODAY! CAN-
CEL YOUR TIME-
SHARE. NO Risk
Pr ogr am 100%
Money Back Guaran-
tee. FREE Consulta-
tion. Call Us NOW.
We Can Hel p!
1-800-282-3206
Apartments
Unfurnished
1 BR, 1 BA efficiency
apt., $350 mo., $200
dep. and 2Br 2Ba
$490mo 860-1144
2 BR Apts, kit. appl.,
W&D conn., $500 &
up. Handicap access.
317-5190 / 317-5192
BRYANT: 200 Prick-
ett Rd., 2 BR., 1 BA
apt., Nice. $595 mo.,
$200 dep., 847-5377
NOTICE: All real es-
tate advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to the Fair Housing
Act which makes it il-
legal to advertise any
preference, limitation
or di scr i mi nat i on
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or in-
tention to make any
such preference. We
will not knowingly ac-
cept any advertising
for real estate which
is in violation of the
law. All persons are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis.
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Apartments
Unfurnished
YOU’LL LOVE Us!
Move in Special on
1 BR & 2 BR
Apartments
Limited time only!
Must qualify.
Castle Properties
Call Connie @
501-626-4596
CAMRY COURT
Now Open
in Bryant
New Construction
2 BR, 2 BA or 2.5 BA
off Wilkerson Rd.
on Sadie Dr.
(By Hill Farm Elem.)
Call Terri the on-site
manager for appt.
501-804-0125
Bldg. 1225 #2
or call Dale King
501-539-1935
Visit our web-site
www.arkansas
apartments.net
Houses for Rent
1 BR, 1 BA house,
403 S. Third. No pets.
$450 mo., $300 dep.,
501-326-3907
1015 WOOODLAWN
3Br 2Ba Fenced Yard
Cal l f or det ai l s
501-821-2767
1103 A ALCOA 2BR
No Pets, $625mo
$400dep Please call
501-860-5073
3 & 4 BEDROOM
$825 -$1400 mo.,
Haskell, Benton &
Bryant. 315-9370
3BR 2BA Benton
Schools $915mo and
$800dep. Please call
840-7626
3BR 2BA Like New
New Appl. No Pets
864 Montclair
$850mo+Dep Please
Call 501-840-3694
Looking for a good
deal? Search the
Courier Classifieds!!
Houses for Rent
3BR 2BA home for
rent 3989 Mountain
Crest, Shannon Hills
Call 501-743-0930
BRYANT - Nice
Townhome. 3 BR, 2
BA, 1300 sq. ft., $750
mo., 501-847-5377
Eagle Properties
LLC
315–2075
Nice 2 & 3 BR Homes
from $500 to $925
Apartments
1 BR’s from $415
2 BR’s from $475
*based on availability
Deposit & References
Required
eaglepropsaline.com
EXECUTIVE HOME -
Hurricane Lake Es-
tates very roomy,
$1,950 mth, $750
dep. Avail Oct. 1st.
Call for appointment
315-2075
FOR LEASE/SALE
New 3 & 4 BR, 2 BA,
brick, FP, ceiling fans,
carpet, 2 car garage,
patio. Go to: www.
catalyst-residential.com
or 501-697-6342
FOR RENT 4Br 2Ba
Cedar Ridge in Ben-
ton $950mo + Dep,
Call 944-4976
HASKELL 204
GLENN OAK 3BR, 2
BA, 2 car garage.
Nice. $750 mo. $600
dep. 501-847-5377
NEWER Home in Emerald
Valley! 3/2, Fenced yard,
$1300 mo $1300 dep,
Avail end of October, Call
501.326.7407
NICE 2BR 1Ba Re-
cently updated. Stove
& Refrig Furn. Ready
to occupy.No house
pets, no large dogs,
fenced yard.$660mo,
dep, & refences req.
Call Del Roberson,
Owner/Agent,
315-8011, 317-5944)
evenings-315-2321.
Housing accepted.
NICE 3BR $925mo
and $925dep No Pets
1315 Hwy 35 Call
303-8717
NICE 3BR 2BA, 2 car
garage, 348 Meadow
Creek Dr. Haskell,
Call 501-732-6075
VERY NICE 4BR
3BA, $1,550 mo, 5
Mountain Vista, Call
501-732-6075
Classifieds Work!
Houses for Rent
TAKING RENT Appli-
cat i ons Peacef ul
country setting 3Br
2Ba 1900 Sq. ft.
$750mo Appl. Incl.
Call 501-249-4240
Mobile Homes
For Rent
2 BR, 1 BA, Quiet
park, Benton Schools.
No Pets! Call any-
time. 501-315-1281
2BR 1BA STOVE
REFRIG NO PETS
317-6426 778-1993
RENT TO OWN
CLEAN/GOOD SHAPE
‘00 16x80 3BR $570
‘95 16x72 2BR $550
Includes lot Rent & Ins
Lake • Fish • Walk Trail
Sunset Lake • 951-2842
Miscellaneous
For Rent
SEE THE SATELLITE
TV Difference Pack-
ages as LOW as
$19.99/month! FREE
DVR Upgrade. FREE
HD Upgrade. FREE
Professional Installa-
tion! Call NOW and
Start SAVING!
1-866-795-9295
Miscellaneous
For Sale
SEE THE SATELLITE
TV Difference! Pack-
ages as LOW as
$19.99/month! FREE
DVR Upgrade. FREE
HD Upgrade. FREE
Professional Installa-
tion! Call NOW and
Start SAVING!
1-866-725-5125
VENT FREE Propane
Gas Heater Never
Used $150, 12 inch
Delta portable planer
used 2 times $175,
100 gallon Propane
tank $50 315-8442
VERA WANG Wed-
ding Dress Size7/8
Never worn or altered
Accessories Included
Cost $800, sell for
$500 Pl ease cal l
501-607-0268
Music Instruction
LESSONS: Guitar,
Piano, Vocals. &
Drums. Roan Music.
501-315-2600
Musical
Merchandise
Cushing
Piano Service
Tune • Repair
Player Pianos & Pump Organs
778-6584
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Pets & Supplies
BENTON ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
501-776-5972
benton.petfinder.com
BRYANT ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
www.bryant.petfinder.com
www.1-800-save-a-pet.com
www.1888pets911.org
Hay For Sale
HAY
FOR SALE
Mixed grass clean.
Fertilized. 4X5 net
wrapped. In the field
cutting now.
$
35.00 loaded
1 to 400 bales
available
Buy as many as you
need. Great horse hay.
501-840-1529 or
501-860-8080
Heavy Equip-
SURPLUS EQUIP-
MENT. Online auc-
tions HUGE selection.
BIG savi ngs. NO
Buyer fees Low Seller
f ees BARGAI NS!
Register FREE Use
Promo Code cnhi313.
LIVE support.
www.SurplusOnThe.NET
334-215-3019
Autos Wanted
DONATE A CAR
Humane Society of
the United States
FREE Next-DAY
TOWING! Running or
Not. Tax Deductible.
Call Before Tax Year
Ends!
1-800-418-1562
Recreational
Vehicles
06 FEMA Gulfstream
$3,995 8x32 set up in
Sunset Lake 951- 2842
Lake • Fish • Walk Trails
2006 26FT. Keystone
Camping Trailer Real
Good cond. Selling
due to health Call
501-939-2055
Let the
Courier Classifieds
work for you.
Call Cathy or Kim
to place your
Classified Ad.
Mon.-Fri. 8am-5pm
315-8228
or come by
321 N. Market St.
Want to Downsize
Your Gas Guzzler?
Sell it in the Courier
Classifieds. Call to
place your ad today!
315-8228
Recreational
Vehicles
Due to our record
breaking year, we would
like to say Thank You
Saline County!
And to show our appre-
cialtion we are discount-
ing all of our inventory for
the rest of October. Save
thousands on Motor
homes, Travel trailers,
Fifth wheels and Pop up
campers. Now is the time
to act if you have been
thinking about purchasing
a RV. Stop by and check
us out. RV City Benton
800.578.2489
www.rvcity.biz
Open Sundays 12-5
Mobile Homes
For Sale
RENT TO OWN
CLEAN/GOOD SHAPE
‘00 16x80 3BR $570
‘95 16x72 2BR $550
Includes lot Rent & Ins
Lake • Fish • Walk Trail
Sunset Lake • 951-2842
Lots & Acreage
10 ACRES for
$90,000 OR, 5 Acres
for $45,000 west of
Benton off 70 West,
Call 501-882-6331
Real Estate
CANCEL YOUR
TI MESHARE. NO
Risk Program STOP
Mortgage & Mainte-
nance Payments To-
day. 100% Money
Back Guarant ee.
FREE Consultation.
Call Us NOW. We
C a n H e l p
1-888-356-5248
1055 DOWNING
(Wellington Pt.)
Fri & Sat. 7a-?
Organ, Furniture
Indoor & Outdoor,
HH items, Linen,
Antiques, Clothing,
Too Much To List!
Moderately Confused Herman
Crossword Challenge
Kit ‘n’ Carlyle
Celebrity Cipher
Here’s How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken
down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the
numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and
box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out the order in which
the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues
already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you
name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!
Astro•graph
bernice bede osol
www.bernice4u.com.
Alley Oop
Big Nate
Born Loser
Thatababy
Frank and Ernest
Grizzwells
Monty
Arlo and Janis
Soup to Nutz
SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 12, 2013
Keep life simple and cost-
effective in the coming months. You
should save for a rainy day and avoid
anyone who tends to disrupt your
life. Emotional matters will escalate,
making this a year of unavoidable
change. Keep your options open and
your money in a safe place.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Focus
on what’s ahead instead of living in
the past. The present is what will
count if you want to achieve a bright-
er future. Avoid emotional confronta-
tions.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- A
change will do you good. Visit places
you have never been before or strike
up conversations with people doing
things that interest you. Diversify, and
you’ll feel satisfied.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)
-- Consider what motivates you, and
you’ll find a better way to spend your
time and to get ahead. A thrill only
lasts for a moment. Strive for longev-
ity.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- Distance yourself from anyone who
is unpredictable. You will maintain
control if you follow a set plan. Take
care of responsibilities early so you
can socialize or take care of personal
needs.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- Deal with personal responsibilities
first and clear the way for love, laugh-
ter and enjoying life. Step away from
anyone who makes you feel guilty or
puts demands on your time.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- Don’t take anything or anyone for
granted. Listen carefully and abide
by the rules. Disillusionment regard-
ing a personal relationship is likely.
Do your own thing and protect your
money and possessions.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- You’ll make a big impression by
offering solutions and hands-on help
to someone in need. Reconnect with
someone you have worked or dealt
with in the past. New beginnings look
promising.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- It will be difficult to think clearly
concerning work-related matters.
Put your emotions aside and look at
the big picture. Compromise will be
necessary if you don’t want to suffer a
loss.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) --
Indulge in activities that are physically
and emotionally challenging, and you
will succeed in reaching your goal.
Taking a different approach to life
and love will attract someone special.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-- Enjoy making new friends or visit-
ing places you’ve never been before.
Expand your interests and pick up
knowledge and skills that will help
you address a personal problem.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- You
need a change. Spice up your life,
participate in a fun activity or shop
for items that will update your
appearance. Make plans to enjoy
time spent with friends or loved
ones.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-- You will pick up valuable informa-
tion that will help you make a deci-
sion that can improve your personal
position or a relationship you have
with someone exciting.
Saturday, October 12, 2013
news@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier Page 15
ComiCs
16 The Saline Courier
Saturday, October 12 , 2013
GM CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED SELECT MODELS AS LOW AS 1.9% APR WAC
‘12 GMC Terrain
‘11 GMC Sierra
‘12 GMC Acadia
‘12 Cadillac Escalade
‘10 Buick Lucerne
‘07 Lexus 1S250
‘11 Ford Explorer
‘13 Toyota Sienna
‘12 Honda Fit
Sunroof, Leather, SLT, 53,326 miles
SLE Package, PW/PL, Alloy Wheels,
5.3 V8, 18,699 miles
Denali Package, Heated/Cooled Seats,
Navigation, DVD, 14,573 miles
Fully Loaded, 22” Wheels,
Navigation, Sunroof
CX6, Sunroof, Chrome Wheels
Sunrood, Heated Leather, 77,079 miles
Limited, Dual sunroof,
Chrome Wheels, 36,425 miles
XLE, Heated Leather, Sunroof,
Rear DVD, 15,891 miles
PW/PL, Tilt, Cruise Control, Automatic,
7,575 miles
STK #7417
STK #4074
STK #3735
STK #4991
STK #8217
STK #0404
STK #5722
STK #6252
STK #2644
$
19,900
$
22,900
$
54,909
$
16,900
$
18,900
$
29,900
$
30,900
Save Thousands
vs New
Save Thousands
vs New
I-30 Alcoa Exit
Next to Target
501.315.7100 BUICK • GMC
Family Owned
CUSTOMER FRIENDLY
Custom
ers Roy and Salie Jane Rainey
with Salesm
an Coach Hall
proud
member of
Customer Adam Sholes with
Service Advisor Brad James
This document is © 2013 by editor - all rights reserved.
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